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With Trump gone, NATO wages war on climate threat

7 Comments
By Robin Emmott and Sabine Siebold

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© Thomson Reuters 2021.

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

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As a taxpayer, I would rather pay for weapons than for ways to use renewable energy for the US mili8tary, unless it proves the effectiveness of those weapons.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Electric tanks, however, are not an option.

"It will prove difficult to install charging stations on the battlefield in time before the fighting starts," said a German defencse source who declined to be named.

Someone please tell me this is a joke. “… in time …” (Roaring with laughter.) You mean an enemy would be so inconsiderate as to not allow time for charging?

It’s a good thing Uncle Joe and Prince Vlad are such good buddies now.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

With Trump gone, the whole world breathes a sigh of relief.

Good riddance.

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If the temperatures in battle tanks are too high, equip the crew with insulated cooling suits.

How did Rommel's Afrika Korps manage tank warfare in the desert?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

With Trump gone, the entire world tackles Climate Change.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Someone please tell me this is a joke. “… in time …” (Roaring with laughter.) You mean an enemy would be so inconsiderate as to not allow time for charging?

It’s a good thing Uncle Joe and Prince Vlad are such good buddies now.

The article didn't mention how much difficulty NATO forces operating in Afghanistan have had securing the fleets of tankers hauling fuel for their aircraft and ground vehicles. Protecting tanker convoys consumes a great deal of combat air and ground power that cannot be employed against enemy forces. Battery electric vehicles and solar powered charging stations at combat outposts can greatly reduce the amount of fuel that has to be hauled by trucks, and guarded by military forces, freeing those forces to fight the enemy.

There is a parallel effort to develop very small nuclear power plants that can be air and truck transported to bases and used as their energy source. This again is a result of the huge problems NATO has had securing their fuel shipments.

Not all of their fuel problems are due to enemy action either. There have been accidents that have resulted in as many as 400 tankers burning at one time. Faulty equipment, sloppy habits by the drivers, whatever the original cause there have been situations such as one recently at a major border crossing where hundreds of tanker loads of fuel went up in flames. Battery electric vehicles do not need these fuels and they eliminate that weakness in the logistics chain.

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If the temperatures in battle tanks are too high, equip the crew with insulated cooling suits.

How did Rommel's Afrika Korps manage tank warfare in the desert?

Not finding anything called an Ozelot in German service today. Main battle tanks like the German Leopard II and American M-1A2 are air conditioned and have serious filtration systems to protect the crew from nuclear, biological and chemical warfare. Same for their armored fighting vehicles Puma, Boxer, TPz Fuchs and ATF Dingo. There is a really small tank used by the Germans called the Wiesel II designed for use by airborn forces that might be a real hot box in some situations.

A German analysis of their experience with WWII desert warfare showed internal temps of their tanks rose as high as 45 degrees and called these "unendurable for the crews". The analysis mentions that both sides observed a cease fire for three hours mid day to allow men to shelter from the worst of the heat. What is different now is that we seem to have heat in Poland approaching the heat found in North Africa 70 years ago.

If the temperatures in battle tanks are too high, equip the crew with insulated cooling suits. Pay particular attention to Chapter 3: Special Factors in the link below.

https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USA/CSI/CSI-Desert/toppe.asp.html

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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