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Why are UK and EU still arguing over Brexit?

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By JILL LAWLESS

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Why are UK and EU still arguing over Brexit?

Because, ultimately, Boris cares only about Boris.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Sorry long post, however broken down in to bite size..........

"The Withdrawal Agreement creates legal certainty where Brexit created uncertainty.

It preserves the Union’s interests."

Michel Barnier, 17 October 2019

The EU-UK Withdrawal Agreement

Learn about the results of past negotiations: The Withdrawal Agreement with its chapters on Citizens’ Rights and the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland.

https://ec.europa.eu/info/european-union-and-united-kingdom-forging-new-partnership/eu-uk-withdrawal-agreement_en

Whether the EU-UK find a consensus in a future partnership, this partnership is not dependent on a Free Trade Agreement.

The current above signed withdrawal agreement, in realty, holds the key to any future relationship.

Every political, economic sector, security arrangements, safeguarding citizens’ rights, UK/EU is written sagaciously into the Treaty.

The Withdrawal Agreement defines a stringent mechanism for/of dispute resolution.

This is projected into the EU negotiating directives, setting out clear objectives for a system of dispute resolution which will need to be enshrined into the future trading relationship/agreement. 

Including a primary role for the European Court of Justice (ECJ). Only EU will institutions set or interpret EU law. In this case, a formal mechanism for resolving disputes must refer to any ruling by the ECJ for interpretation.

This principle is written into the Political Declaration agreed between the UK and the EU.

The argument over Fisheries, although important, jobs/ industry, is an irrelevance when breaking down the withdrawal agreement sentence by sentence.    

In the forward the Institute for Government has made this clear

“The UK and the EU have implemented the Withdrawal Agreement which set out the terms of the UK’s exit. Disputes arising under the agreement are to be resolved in the first place by consultations in the UK–EU joint committee. If those consultations are unsuccessful after three months, the dispute goes to an arbitration panel. The UK and EU must each nominate 10 legal experts to form the ‘pool’ of potential panellists. They must jointly nominate five legal experts to serve as potential chairs. When a dispute arises, the UK and EU each select two panellists from the pool. Those four panellists then elect a chair from that pool. The parties must comply with the panel’s ruling within a reasonable period of time. If the offending party fails to do so, it can be required to pay a financial penalty or to suffer the suspension of some other part of the agreement. The ECJ retains its exclusive jurisdiction over issues of EU law. If a dispute arises concerning an issue of EU law, the panel is required to submit it to the ECJ for interpretation.”  

It really does not matter one iota what FTA UK government signs with the current withdrawal agreement still in effect

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Because it is not in the interests of the EU to have a successful UK after Brexit.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

Because it is not in the interests of the EU to have a successful UK after Brexit.

wrong its not advantageous for the EU to make leaving the EU more advantageous than staying, otherwise why would any other member state want to stay. No the EU will make being in the EU more advantageous than leaving and rightly so.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Because the UK told its people it could have its cake and eat it too. Then they voted for politicians who don't know how to bake and have esoteric interpretations of what it means to eat.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Tangerine2000, Yes I think on the face of it, logical contends that a successful UK outside of EU regulatory framework, binding treaty obligations would encourage member state, people/government to reconsider membership, especially net contributors.

This pandemic has changed the dynamics, both economically and politically.

All 27 are effectively economically glued together.

A recovery plan for Europe.....

https://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/policies/eu-recovery-plan/#:~:text=An%20EU%20budget%20to%20fuel%20the%20recovery&text=On%2021%20July%202020%2C%20EU,Next%20Generation%20EU%20(NGEU).

Review the Capital Markets Recovery Package.

All are bound to this €672.5 billion, Recovery and Resilience Facility, welded together indefinitely.

This is one of the reasons the one trillion euro UK-EU trading relationship is so important to all 27 member states.

Outside, without any future partnership deal, the global community, some 350 countries will undercut all sectors.

A reason why Michel Barnier, is still at the negotiating table.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@itsonlyrocknroll - are you sure the world has 350 countries? Last time I checked, it was slightly over half that number.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

one of the reasons the one trillion euro UK-EU trading relationship is so important

Fog in the Channel, Continent cut off.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Trevor Peace, well WTO lists around 164, however if one counts all trading counties listed on Wikipedia, some very small and isolated, then it reaches that number.

I was highlighting UK is part of a global community and with a restructured/flexible business model could reach out to much wider global trading audience.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

‘UK is part of a global community and with a restructured/flexible business model could reach out to much wider global trading audience.’

You have obviously failed to understand the current economic and global situation. With the Covid pandemic and its economic impact things are not what they used to be a year ago. Trump’s trade deal is on hold and Japan has more interest in the EU because it has a much larger market. Perhaps China can strike a trade deal with Britain? The UK is bargaining from a weaker position and Boris Johnson should stop his nationalist rhetoric.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Trevor Peace, well WTO lists around 164, however if one counts all trading counties listed on Wikipedia, some very small and isolated, then it reaches that number.

Ah those trading powerhouses Trisan de Cuhha, St. Helena, Ascension and Falklands, lol.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The unfortunate cold reality is that, over a period of time, the russians worked to undermine public opinion and methodically create doubt so that they, the russians, could sow discord in the confidence in the EU. Very similar playbook as what the russians did, and continue to do, in the USA. Their efforts have achieved their goal both in the UK and USA.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

That's the whole point Desert Tortoise, full access to the UK market will be beneficial, economically, socially, politically, whether these Nations, large or small, you define rather disingenuously, as trading powerhouses or otherwise.

Many Nations, especially British Commonwealth, African, have been shut out of the UK market because of the huge subsidy regime associated with the Common Agriculture Policy.

The EU commission peddles a rather unique brand of hypocrisy when trading with third world country.

EU ruthlessly dumps and shut out, then slams the door on access to member states markets.

Tobia, this pandemic has changed the whole concept of global and economic trade.

Especially, supply chain management, procurement/logistics of just-in-time inventory.

Look, this whole environmentally unfriendly model that reduces UK road infrastructure networking into mobile warehousing is unsustainable before this pandemic struck.

It is time to face reality, and accept change. The UK withdrawal from the EU, is in many respects a blessing in disguise.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Four years???... Just leave! The votes in. What's Europe going to do invade the U.K? The details will sort themselves out as they come up...

0 ( +2 / -2 )

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