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How the Earth's tilt creates short, cold January days

11 Comments
By Deanna Hence

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I still want to know how the vast oceans of water manage to adhere to a globe earth spinning at around 1000mph and racing around the sun in a corkscrew fashion at 64,000 mph with Polaris which is the only fixed star in the skies is always visible on this fantastic journey.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

The precession cycle of Earth's elliptical orbit around the Sun takes about 23,000 years. So, where currently Earth is closest to the Sun during northern winter, in about 11,500 years, Earth will be closest to the Sun during northern summer.

That Earth is currently closest to the Sun during northern winter explains why northern winters are shorter than northern summers; because when Earth is closest to the Sun in its orbit, it travels fastest in its orbit. In 11,500 years, if humans are still around, we will want to change the calendar so that August has 28 days, and February 31.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

With luck, I will be able to get away from this winter weather in a moth or two.

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picture a stick going through the Earth, from the North Pole to the South Pole. During the 24 hours that it takes for the Earth to rotate once around its axis, every point on its surface faces toward the sun for part of the time and away from it for part of the time. 

If you actually draw the picture, I think you'll find that's not true.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

We’ve got nice warm January days down here in Australia. Sitting here with the back door open, a nice cool evening breeze wafting in after a sunny afternoon in the mid-20s…

1 ( +1 / -0 )

January and February are the coldest in the UK, but where as in my childhood in the south of the country we had snow, now we virtually never see any snow.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

vic.MJan. 17  09:18 am JST

I still want to know how the vast oceans of water manage to adhere to a globe earth spinning at around 1000mph and racing around the sun in a corkscrew fashion at 64,000 mph with Polaris which is the only fixed star in the skies is always visible on this fantastic journey.

Polaris wasn't always the North Star. The ancient Egyptians buiklt their huge pyramids to align with the 'North Star' in order to make their calendars, but the 'North Star' back then was Thuban, a star in the constellation Draco the Dragon. And gravity keeps the oceans 'together'.

englisc aspyrgendJan. 17  08:28 pm JST

January and February are the coldest in the UK, but where as in my childhood in the south of the country we had snow, now we virtually never see any snow.

Climate change. It's not a myth no matter what liars like Trump say.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Big Yen, use the balmy weather to brush up on your knowledge of how Parliaments and elsewhere are not unfettered in their pursuit of legislation.

See my explanatory comment on the Novak saga

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Explanatory comment deleted.....Hmm

Once again....Majority rules dont make for open slather law making.

Legislation constrained by Constitution, Treaties, Common Law principles etc.

High Courts often overturn legislation made by a "majority govt. "

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I still want to know how the vast oceans of water manage to adhere to a globe earth spinning at around 1000mph

Because the rate of velocity is constant. Only acceleration and deceleration create force, as you'll notice when you're flying at 600mph yet can walk easily down the airplane aisle. If Earth's orbit stopped suddenly stopped, you'd notice.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This is a top priority issue! The earth’s tilt needs to be corrected, but first it would be wise to determine mankind’s contribution to the tilt and especially who can be blamed for it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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