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Is this the end of civilization as we know it?

13 Comments
By Stéphane ORJOLLET

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interesting article. I guess only time will tell. What I would like to see from this pandemic is a prioritizing of working from home, AND the importance of space at home such as more spacious houses and gardens.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I hope if anything, it will change people's hearts + attitudes toward each other and maybe lead to the downfall of authoritarian leaders, corruption and dictatorships around the world. I remember the downfall of Communism in Eastern  Europe in 1989 - 91.

It can happen.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The virus had also shown, he wrote in a piece for the AOC online daily, "that it is possible in a few weeks to suspend a global economic system that until now everyone said was impossible to slow or adjust."

Patently false. Already people are going hungry in India. In more developed countries, paychecks normally are delayed. As are bills. The bills will still arrive on time, but the paychecks will not be there.

The system we have been using is not working, and corruption is rampant. Evolving to a new way of living always sounds good until those revolutionary new ideas are put into practice - often ending in genocides. And I suspect we will go through a few of those before finding a way that works.

Ponder this... how much better would people's lives be if they were not spending 50% of their incomes in various taxes and regulatory fees? And how much further would their money go if prices were not jacked up thanks to those same taxes and regulations?

The solution is people working together, and that is inhibited by overly large government bureaucracies that insert themselves between every human transaction.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

An opportunity to change how we live and work. In the west rich countries we could have that choose but the poorer countries will struggle just as before.

People need to receive a living wage which can be topped up with working. Healthcare and education for all. End the homeless problem by giving them homes.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Ummm... No. #DBITP (Don't Buy Into The Panic)

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

In my opinion, this is the best opportunity for humanity. Humans are the only species of this planet that can really cultivate it to be a natural paradise or we can destroy it. Because of this virus humanity has chance to take a step back, rebuild our skill sets from a dependency based to more of a system we can rely on our selves to survive and use the dependency base as something to fall back on for emergencies. We need to learn to survive on our own, use technology not for pleasure for science and medicine, and we need to learn to cultivate the earth for generations and generations to come because this earth is all we have and so far the only place we know of as of yet in the universe to support life that can sustain humanity.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@Zichi, I think this is the other way around. Western countries people have lost basic life skills and as demonstrated by the current crisis, are left helpless and totally dependent on the omnipresent government. Poor countries are used to hardship and take charge of basic life necessities, their governments are not as intrusive as the Western ones so people are free to do what it takes to survive. If anything, we will see people getting back to simpler life.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The worst scenario and trigger for the end will be when governments are so worn out, stretched thin with the population hungry desperate and dying that the nuke plant workers just stop or can’t show up to work.

what if this is worse than we think and it’s actually more like an HIV/AIDS virus?

One doctor I saw said it’s not pneumonia but more like high altitude sickness and we’re going about treatment all wrong.

Geesh I hope I’m wrong, but you asked.

invalid CSRF

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Hoping those countries that have exported their jobs and supply chain to China realise the mistake and return to being more self reliant by bringing these processes home.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The most important reference on this topic would be Prof. Nick Bostrom on Oxford, head of the rarely studied "existential threats" department. Any other scolar's statement you bring up here is haphazard commenting in comparison.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

No, it is not the end. It is just a warning from god.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Poor countries are used to hardship and take charge of basic life necessities, their governments are not as intrusive as the Western ones so people are free to do what it takes to survive.

C'mon. People in poor countries have lower life expectancies, they have to hardscrabble every day of their lives to get enough food to avoid starvation, to keep themselves and their families from disease, to find clean water, to avoid frequent outbreaks of civil war and violence, they frequently don't have enough money to get their kids educated, etcetera, etcetera. Their governments are more often than not corrupt, self-serving, and really don't give a damn about their people as long as they remain a docile labour force to be exploited by the wealthy as necessary.

If anything, we will see people getting back to simpler life.

That may be - but they wouldn't want to use the lives of the average person in Africa or the poorer parts of Asia or Central and South America as any kind of example.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In answer to the question posed, no.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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