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Key question in Cosby appeal: Does defendant's past matter?

5 Comments
By MARYCLAIRE DALE

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His lawyers, and his wife, Camille, have called the women gold diggers and their testimony lies.

Well of course they would say that. They are hardly unbiased spectators.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

This has to be a joke, right? The champions of justice, impartiality and non-partisanship, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is going to decide what's what... I would laugh but the future of our nation is also in these criminals hands.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

It has always been the case that jurors consider a defendant's past, whether they say they do, or not. It is human nature to do so, no matter how much we object otherwise. The question becomes how much of a defendant's past should be considered by the jurors, and that is a question best answered by legal minds more keen than mine.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Cosby, a rapist seeks to be released on a technicality. This speaks ill of the legal profession and certainly determines Cosby is either a psychopath, sociopath or both. High dollar attorneys in the pay of criminals bespeak of a criminal justice system that is not just corrupt, but rigged, as always, in favor of the wealthy.

That he seeks to be released because he is elderly and may contract the covid virus is simply another indication of his once and current privileged status. The man is a serial rapist and should have been incarcerated decades ago, instead he was a beloved television character and comedian based on a popular and fabricated persona & image.

He should spend the remainder of his life atoning for his crimes and prison is the best place for him to enact such. Man is a serial rapist looking to be set free. With a bevy of lawyers seeking to do just that via a loophole in the law, regardless of the fact he is guilty.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

@Richard Gallagher

Good job!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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