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Political compromises – like the debt-limit deal – have never been substitutes for lasting solutions

6 Comments
By Maurizio Valsania

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It's the best we can do until our electoral systems are fixed from top to bottom by removing First Past the Post winner take all, and the Electoral College.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

‘Doing what good we can’

More like "doing what little we can". The current US political system is unfortunately heavily biased against reaching long lasting solutions, because the personal interest of the people taking the decisions come first, the party interests come second and the interests of the population in general come at last.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

 because the personal interest of the people taking the decisions come first, the party interests come second and the interests of the population in general come at last

True. And the corporate MSM is the Pied Piper of this debt limit deal lie.

Bread and circuses

invalid CSRF

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The debt limit circus keeps the proles occupied. It has some value in forcing two increasingly extreme parties who might not otherwise talk to each other, to compromise. It works equally well regardless of who is in power, limiting the excesses of the party of government. So although it is a sign of a flawed system, it has value.

The 'interests of the population in general' always come last. That's inherent in the nature of politics. People go into politics to implement their grand plan on society, not to tweak things to make life better for people.

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@GBR48June 9 11:55 pm JST

The debt limit circus keeps the proles occupied. It has some value in forcing two increasingly extreme parties who might not otherwise talk to each other, to compromise.

The problem is it is nuclear device just sitting there all primed and ready. The regular gridlock should be enough to force compromise, not adding in the risk of total destruction.

It works equally well regardless of who is in power, limiting the excesses of the party of government.

It actually only works for the party that controls the house. 1/2 of 1/3 of government.

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I reckon I disagree with the premise of the article. The ability of opposing parties to a political matter to come come to a compromise agreement is the foundation of good government. I would argue that rigidity, all or nothing demands and expectations that yesterday's compromise is sacred and writ in stone are the problem.

Traditional societies locked into never changing laws and customs are almost without exception impoverished and poorly educated. Technology, business and living standards change too rapidly for such societies to adjust and keep up. People need to be realistic and understand that change will happen with or without them and that there is a high price for being left behind. The ability to compromise for the good of your community or nation are essential to keep up in a fast changing world.

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