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Quake response showcases Japan's resilient spirit

26 Comments
By Jay Alabaster

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26 Comments
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Japanese are a role model in humanity. We need to learn from them.

They are the most resilient, courageous, humble and unselfish people I have ever known.

God is always with them in time of crisis.

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I see everyone is an expert now. Too much information is a dangerous thing.

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NuckinFutz, that is why I'm not worried about Japan coming back.

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I spent the day helping many clean up the seaport of Misawa in the Aomori Prefecture and I am amazed at the efforts of those who lost everything to get on with life and start over. The area was completely devestated but everyone worked together and worked hard! An amazing spirit!

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The sky is falling! It is the end of the world! Help Help!!!!

Well, back to work.

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and how do they tell you radiation will float down the pacific to Osaka? think a little before you type.

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there are no such thing of experts anymore. there are only scientific equipment or sophisticated read and measuring equipment. and/or computer modeling.

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ihomeijapan4009 that is rubbish, there is absolutely NO scienctific or logical reason to support that nonsense. Leading experts from Japan, UK and US would tell you the same. calm down

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are you mad, no danger to Tokyo if completely false. radiation will enter the ocean waters and travel down as far as Osaka. you have to remember, that there are a few mountain ranges north of Tokyo. down wind currents will reach any city or town south of the reactor.

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@Fadamor Physics and weather both agree that a radiation plume would be broken up by winds and not much more strong than background radiation by the time it reaches Tokyo.

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Tokyo could still be in danger of fallout after a total meltdown of a core, but only when the winds are coming from the plant. The prevailing winds in that area normally don't do that.

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Also, every expert on nuclear energy has said that Tokyo is in no danger even if the reactors melt down. The physics just isn't there. But we all know experts are stupid, right?

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So foreigners are not afraid of social disorder? I welcome you to Shinjuku, where not only are the Gucci and Eves Saint Laurant and other luxury brand goods shops locked and shuttered, but all the shelves are empty! Wouldn't want those looted by marauding gangs of angry Japanese as society crumbles, right? After all, two of the broken down reactors are made by General Electric, a US company, which, by the way, knew they were structurally defective. So let's all hope that doesn't get broad play in the press.

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@tamanegi: The article didn't say there was "no looting or profiteering." It said there was "little if any" Please read things correctly before you going around misquoting them.

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I agree with the observations of this writer to a point however there isn't much for the survivors of this tragedy and ongoing crisis to do when they have lost everything and/or are traumatised by events.

The Japanese people in hindsight should have been more pro-active in the nuclear energy debate in their country.

And as for: "Amid the chaos, foreign journalists have remarked on the polite demeanor, the lack of anger, the little if any looting or profiteering that seems to characterize disasters elsewhere" This is a falsehood. After the Kobe earthquake it was reported that there were looters and conmen preying on the survivors and those affected.

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haiku to the elderly in japan from america~

you are amazing~

your spirit is respected

all around the world... j.stone

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Calm, patient and persevere, these Japanese virtue is well known in our Asian society. However, there is some comment that the younger generation may not inherit all these virtue.

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IFeelMust: You hit the essence of life. The key to true living and so has the people that have helped you. Religion does not matter but it is the hand that reaches out in time of need. God bless you and watch over all.

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I have no intention of leaving this country...in fact, I'll do whatever possible to stay here as long as I can....this country is more home to me than my country of birth. Thank you, Japan for giving me a home.

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Well, if you take a look back at history, the place where the reactors were built was actually a deserted place with no village, towns, or cities around it. When the plant was built, people started building houses, around the plant then a village was formed..after 40 years the town grew into such a huge community, all depending on the PowerPlant. Those who live nearby gets around 2 to 3 Million Yens subsidy per year coming from the plant..because it created a sense of normalcy and peace having houses built just around the plant.

The PowerPlant gave, the powerplant takes it away. People in Iwate also learned the lesson hard...That particular place is known to have powerful tsunamis and almost in the last century they got 4 monstrous tsunamis that wiped out their villages and took thousands of lives but because it it a very rich fishing ground they kept on returning and building their villages around that place.

Build your house on a rock it will stay. Build your house on a sand, it will sink.

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Shinjuku boy, that's not what I've heard. Everybody who leaves is scared of radiation.

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Kazuyoshi Chiba is a rock star. Awesome.

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No fleeing here I'm doing what I can to help in the village, while I'm not Japanese, people that need help don't care where I'm from they need help and I'm here to do what I can! I'm seeing this through with my Japanese friends that welcomed me to their country and their village! I have found it hard to get food for my kids, the people here have given us theirs shared their water shared their.. I just can't go on, we are a community in trouble and holding each other up regardless of where we are from.

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shinjukuboy, I know some people who have temporarily left Tokyo and it is not because they think that social order will breakdown. Sad that you feel the need to make such comments at a time like this.

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This is in contrast to all the foreign residents who are fleeing the country in a panic. Well, I guess we know the real reason they are fleeing. They think the social order will break down and then they will become targets of angry mobs of Japanese. Images of post-Katrina New Orleans come to mind, I guess.

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“shikata ga nai”

A very fitting phrase for the current situation. Nothing anyone can really do but take things as they come.

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