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The Beauty of Bonsai

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Japan's delicate, miniature bonsai are instantly recognizable and enjoyed by people the world over. Mastering the art of displaying these trees so their beauty is fully rendered and can be truly appreciated takes dedication and time.

In "The Beauty of Bonsai: A Guide to Displaying and Viewing Nature's Exquisite Sculpture," bonsai expert Junsun Yamamoto explores the captivating world of bonsai and guides the reader through the various techniques of creating displays for these trees that enhance and heighten their innate beauty. Through a combination of discussion, photos, and explanation, as well as theory on the aesthetics of bonsai, Yamamoto shows the reader the how to get the most out of their bonsai displays.

All aspects of bonsai appreciation are covered, including traditional composite arrangements as well as important tips on how to create the most exquisite displays that utilize perspective akin to that of landscape paintings. Yamamoto also explores the various themes for displaying bonsai, such as mountain or forest themes, and devotes a whole section of the book to bonsai pots, with lavish photos of works by famous creators.

The reader is also guided through the process of creating a professional bonsai display by renowned bonsai creator Masahiko Kimura. Employing an array of photographs, the artist's creative process is outlined in detail, from conceptual art to finished masterpiece, giving the reader a unique insight into how the true beauty of bonsai is most effectively manifested and portrayed. This book will be a welcome addition to the libraries of bonsai lovers everywhere.

© Japan Today

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Kodansha International seems as determined as ever to publish hard-hitting, controversial books that expose the real side of Japan!

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I'm gonna go out on a limb here, but I have a feeling not too many people on JT spend their Saturday nights trimming a bonsai tree.

At least they're cheap here; in the US they used to cost a fortune.

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I enjoy Bonsai, did an extensive course a few(many) years ago.

They trees themselves are not that expensive if you buy a sapling or grow it from the seed. Some of the tools/scissors can get pricey though.

Doing a Bonsai from a sapling is fun and they don't need all that much work/trimming/wiring as that is mostly done at certain times/seasons. :D

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Beelzebub

Kodansha International seems as determined as ever to publish hard-hitting, controversial books that expose the real side of Japan!

Your comment reflects a very plebian grasp of Japan ! Bonsai is a complex art form indigenous to ancient, oriental culture, originating in China around 200 A.D., refined by the Japanese. ( @12th century) . It - like many of the arts in Japan influenced by a combined Shinto/Zen consciousness - works with concrete material to express and open spiritual awareness .

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It - like many of the arts in Japan influenced by a combined Shinto/Zen consciousness - works with concrete material to express and open spiritual awareness .

You're pulling my leg, right? You want to 'open spiritual consciousness', try four sticks of tsukune (minced chicken breast) dipped in raw egg and sprinkled with shichimi-togarashi, washed down with three or four jumbo chuhai.

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You want to 'open spiritual consciousness', try four sticks of tsukune (minced chicken breast) dipped in raw egg and sprinkled with shichimi-togarashi, washed down with three or four jumbo chuhai

LOL . . . . don't forget the little bonsai tree for ambience !

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distorting nature to some preconceived idea of 'beauty'... japanese love the 'image' of nature - not nature itself as it is too unpredictable and must therefore be 'controlled'...

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I'm gonna go out on a limb here, but I have a feeling not too many people on JT spend their Saturday nights trimming a bonsai tree.

Obviously a young person ... but I will give the Zen view anyway. Currently and historically the best Bonsai are done by Masters who are in their last 20 year period ... as it requires not only skills but a huge sum of 'patience.'

However, the best use of time is the starting of a Bonsai in the second 20 year period, and allowing the tree to mature in your lifetime, sharing the skill and beauty with others, including your family. We learn a very exacting skill, patience, and appreciation and the beauty of man's control over nature (in this case a small delicate, tree, grass, or object) - it 'enlightens' you.

You also learn how to create miniature forests, or scenes of incredible beauty ~ although quiet delicate.

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This was a great review and I appreciate reading BlackKnight's insights.

There is a Japan festival here (Atlanta) starting tomorrow and I will keep an eye out for displays of bonsai.

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nylex4,

distorting nature to some preconceived idea of 'beauty'... japanese love the 'image' of nature - not nature itself as it is too unpredictable and must therefore be 'controlled'...

You might want to branch out from reading Alex Kerr. His view of Japan is somewhat preconceived as well.

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