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'To Kill a Mockingbird' has lessons for terror fight

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Was a good movie. I think I had to read this book in grade school.

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can never replace Gregory Peck for that. Really was the roll of a lifetime. However the issue of those who hate and justify hate comes to mind if they had ever read the book or watched films such as these to begin with.

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For truly to have seen the film and still have a heart of hate must be such a special case of humanity that society creates gossip or laws to keep them at bay if warned enough, or in jail if not.

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Later, answering questions, Holder defended President Barack Obama’s decision to ban torture in the fight against terrorists.

Aren't prisoners sent to foreign countries for interrogation?

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The DOJ, under Holder, is facing some of the most damaging accusations imaginable. A former DOJ official (and a 'liberal' one at that), ordered by superiors NOT to comment on Holder's decision to exonerate w/o trial 2 Black Panther thugs filmed intimidating voters last November, has bucked the WH and Holder and gone ahead with testimony.

But all we get here are feel-good stories about Holder commenting on one of the most over-rated novels and flicks in all of American history?

Mark Schenker of Canada's Vancouver Liberal Examiner has the story:

Liberal DOJ Attorney Chris Coates Accuses Holder’s DOJ of Racism Against Whites

September 26th, 2010 1:38 am PT
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Another memorable book and film from the 1960s was John Ball's "In the Heat of the Night", in which homicide cop Virgil Tibbs (played by Sidney Poitier) ran rings around Mississippi good old boys. Tibbs and the redneck sheriff played by Rod Steiger parted amicably. The locale used for the filming of the fictional "Sparta, Mississippi" was actually in southern Illinois.

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“It’s a book about injustice, a cautionary tale, but at the same time it’s a book about courage,” said Holder, speaking in a crowded lecture hall in the law school.

Maybe five years ago I was asked to talk to a room of university students (as part of their prep. work) and I recommended that they should read To Kill A Mockingbird to have a basic and sincere understanding of people of different background.

The room was predominantly middle-class and white, yet an almost simple idea of reading Harper Lee's somehow resonated to people inside.

That was a good five years ago but I think that's exactly what Americans need right now as the issue of race, etc becomes more politicized, and as the doctrine of multiculturalism mindlessly turns itself into an exhausting, polarizing dilemma for the west.

Lee's only novel is a good book-- perhaps sentimental-- but as the US Attorney General himself claimed it's a book about courage as well.

For the cynics of (OBAMA's) administration though Mr HOLDER needs more than recommend a book. And in an election year Americans would want to hear more of his good counsels on immigration, Fed-v-State rights and the health care debate to name a few.

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But all we get here are feel-good stories about Holder commenting on one of the most over-rated novels and flicks in all of American history?

Mark Schenker of Canada's Vancouver Liberal Examiner has the story:

Liberal DOJ Attorney Chris Coates Accuses Holder’s DOJ of Racism Against Whites

Unfortunately, dangerous cliques are everywhere, and now it seems even in liberal locker-rooms.

Check Coates’ Direct Eyewitness Testimony to Shine Light on DOJ by Hans A. von Spakovsky via Pajamas Media

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That was a good five years ago but I think that's exactly what Americans need right now as the issue of race, etc becomes more politicized,

Most of us read it in sr or even jr high. The book's reputation is much higher outside America - - in the UK and Australia in particular.And yes, it's because of a certain sentimentality with which race relations in the US are viewed. I have met many a Brit, Aussie or Kiwi who seems to think it is their special mission in life to bring the book and the movie to the awareness of Americans they meet and imagine have had it withheld from them by the evil Republican Party, or similar bogey men. I know non-Americans who have named a son after Peck's character. Recall the Britpop band of the 90s that called themselves "Boo Radley"? It's all a little embarrassing Americans like me. But we usually don't say anything.

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Most of us read it in sr or even jr high.

Unfortunately Harper Lee's was not one of those books assigned to us in h.school-- I remembered Golding and Austen, and of course Shakespeare's Hamlet. (It probably changed now-- not sure.)

The book's reputation is much higher outside America - - in the UK and Australia in particular.And yes, it's because of a certain sentimentality with which race relations in the US are viewed.

The book was ahead of its time, and basically endeared itself as part of that era in US history when the Civil Rights' movement was still uncertain. Obviously the movie with Peck burnished its reputation even more.

Judged simply by its literary merits, Lee's novel is almost the 'feel-good' equivalent of Invisible Man... but then again just imagine how much trouble the Attorney-Gen will get from right-wing cynics and detractors if he recommended the later book instead of To Kill A Mockingbird.

(Yikes!!! I can only imagine LoL)

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Yes, a great book and a superb film adaptation from Screenwriter Horton Foote, Director Robert Mulligan and the role of a lifetime for Gregory Peck.

But as good as the overall film is, if you haven't watched it in awhile, swing by Youtube and check out the opening title sequence with music by Elmer Berstein - its absolutely mesmerizing.

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One of my fav books(beats Momo, Never ending story, LOTR,etc) is "I heard the Owl she called my name"(might be different wording).

Used to read a lot of books as my grandparents had a lot of the old Readers Digest Books(4 to a volume) and we had a large book selection at home(maybe 2000+ titles).

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The very foundation of the terror myth is false. The BBC report "Politics - The power of Nightmares" shows the reality, the roots and the driver behind the scaremongering of a vision-less politicians caste.

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Sadly JT doesn't allow to post the link to Google video as the link itself is seen as "potentially offensive".

Moderator: In an attempt to block spammers, we do not allow http://www to be posted in comments.

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That was a great book and a great film.

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but then again just imagine how much trouble the Attorney-Gen will get from right-wing cynics and detractors if he recommended the later book instead of To Kill A Mockingbird.

Yeah, whatever. How much trouble is Holder in for from the animal 'rights' kooks the mainstream American left is constrained to accommodate these days? Don't forget the scene where the dog gets shot in the street...

Actually, if you know anything about US culture these days you'd know the so-called Right would be glad to see the movie being promoted - - Peck plays a strong, sensible man, a father and, although a widower, obviously a good husband. Hollywood doesn't make em anymore, it doesn't fit The Narrative. I 'd even say that given the politics of the South at the time he would have been a registered Republican - - like Condi Rice's father.

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Yeah, whatever. How much trouble is Holder in for from the animal 'rights' kooks the mainstream American left is constrained to accommodate these days? Don't forget the scene where the dog gets shot in the street...

Invisible Man would have been determined... but for various reasons Holder, the Attorney-Gen, obviously opted for the safer book. Not a bad book, and equally inspiring too =/

As for the dog-scene in To Kill The Mockingbird... good grip if the kooky PETA would actually complaint to Mr HOLDER, and castigate the man for indirectly swaying Americans to 'shoot dogs' in public. (But nowadays, you'll never know LoL)

Actually, if you know anything about US culture these days you'd know the so-called Right would be glad to see the movie being promoted - - Peck plays a strong, sensible man, a father and, although a widower, obviously a good husband. Hollywood doesn't make em anymore, it doesn't fit The Narrative.

Well, Condi's upbringing is a Christian moralist. She wasn't afraid to say Martin Luther actually influenced her life-- whilst others would nominate less touchy intellectuals like Ben Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and of course JFK.

I don't agree that the American Right have been entirely ignored by Hollywood. Probably just off-putting filmmakers adapting good conservative stories... 2003 film Luther (Terribly dull!)is your example.

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Maybe Mr. Holder should read "Animal Farm" and look in the mirror.

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