travel

Airline industry proposes perfect-size carry-on bag

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I go to Thailand, etc. with a single bag that small for trips up to 3 weeks. It carries everything I need, including snorkel gear and laptop.

I can't figure out why nearly all my fellow Japanese passengers have full-sized suitcases PLUS carry ons, especially since their average stay is 5 days.

Some awareness-raising is called for.

2 ( +10 / -8 )

You've got to be kidding me!!! Just replaced all our carry-on bags with the same TravelPro ones air crews use which are sized for use with most major airlines in the world and now they are going to make them smaller yet again. It seems like only yesterday that they made us go to the smaller ones we just replaced again because they keep forcing us to check them in for those crappy little puddle jumpers in North America and the gorillas they have loading/unloading the bags do their best to destroy everything they get their hands on.

Carry-on bags used to last for 80 to 110 round trips but now when they force you to check in your carry-on even though it's the correct size and within the 10kgs allowed weight, they barely make it to 20 to 25 round trips before they are so crushed and mangled that they look like a McDonald's cheese burger that Fat Albert sat on while riding the bus.

Clearly someone's getting kickbacks for this new push to smaller carry-on bags.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Clearly someone's getting kickbacks for this new push to smaller carry-on bags.

agreed, i would rather pay donation to them instead of buying a new bag every time.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

It's not a carry-on bag if it has wheels... it's a suitcase.

-12 ( +3 / -15 )

I think there should be a formula that takes into account the volume and/or weight of the passenger as well as his/her luggage. It is obvious that the plane itself would require this.

-3 ( +9 / -12 )

That looks about the right size.

I hate people with large carry-ons. It really is disrespectful and selfish. The old rule used to be that it had to fit under the seat as well. When they relaxed that rule, it created our current problems.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Scenario 1: Everyone has the same size carry on bag. 25% of them do not have name tags. Let the fight begin.

Scenario 2: Everyone has the same size carry on bag. 100% of the Japanese pick up their equivalent of three carryon bags worth of duty free. . .and shove them up above.

Figure those out Tom.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

ArtistAtLarge

That looks about the right size.

I hate people with large carry-ons. It really is disrespectful and selfish. The old rule used to be that it had to fit under the seat as well. When they relaxed that rule, it created our current problems

May look about the right size but it's smaller than what is currently accepted and only just enough so 95% will need to buy new bags because their current legal sized ones will be just a chocolate bar too big.

Current sizing for most airlines:

23 cm x 40 cm x 55 cm (9 in x 15.5 in x 21.5 in)

Proposed new 'perfect' size:

20 cm x 35 cm x 55 cm (7.5 in x 13.5 in x 21 in)

The precise size is 55 centimeters (21 inches) tall, 35 centimeters (13.5 inches) wide and 20 centimeters (7.5 inches) deep.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

This is just the airlines way of trying REDUCE carryon luggage & generate more excess baggage chgs & then dismiss the increased amount of claims!

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

MoonrakerJUN I think there should be a formula that takes into account the volume and/or weight of the passenger as well as his/her luggage.

Yes, I've been saying this for years! Weight is weight. Whether it's you or your luggage makes no difference to the strain on the plane.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

I think people should be charged for carry on bags. I know that's not going to be a popular suggestion; however,I'd willingly pay to keep my single case with me and gain the advantage of not waiting at the luggage carousel when I disembark. I can travel more than a month with a bag that size and the handbag I'm allowed.

If passengers have checked larger bags as well, they should continue to pay for those as they do now. Paying for all luggage by the pound would be fair.

Alas, like KnowBetter I purchased the same TravelPro suitcase in currently allowed sizing when the wheels of my 15 year-old one which was still in great shape. Unfortunately, the plastic wheel disintegrated and there were no replacement wheels to be had or I would have had it fixed. Surely the standard for flight crews should be adequate for the paying clients.

That said, more supervision is needed when checking in. People who take a carry on fully expanded should be directed to checked baggage.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

1 size to rule them all..... You must obey us!

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

The weight issue has very little to do with actual weight going on the plane. They still carry the over-weight bags after all. It's just a fining system that was implemented to punish people who didn't follow the guidelines; If we had no weight limit on the plane at all then far more people would be overweight and then the situation might actually arise wherein the plane is legitimately too heavy to fly. I would say that for each passenger on board a plane they cater for approximately 120kg (260lbs) that way possible overweight baggage or "overweight" passengers would be balanced out by other passengers being below that total.

Even if every passengers' total was over that amount the plane can still fly but would burn more fuel most likely.

Creating a system where we physically weighed the passengers and their combined luggage would be ridiculous and simply encourage the problematic fat shaming (and now fat punishing) mindset. I think that if a passenger can still fit in one seat then they are fine. If multiple seats are required then multiple seats should be bought. There is a difference between being around the 100kg (200lb) mark and being too big to fit in a single seat.

TL;DR Over-weight baggage charges are just a symptom of a system that seeks to penalize people for breaking the set rules and have very little to do with the actual safety of the plane. Most passenger planes likely have a buffer of about 30% of the weight limit. Which they likely fill up with other cargo to boost profits if we're honest. But they have to do that in order to ensure that the fuel load is sufficiently burnt to safe landing levels.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Yes, I know people will denounce the idea, but I'm actually surprised the standardization of carry on luggage size didn't happen at least 25-30 years ago, where the proliferation of low-coast airlines--for example Southwest Airlines in the USA and Ryanair and EasyJet in Europe--put a premium on properly-sized carry-on baggage.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

The perfect-sized bag was proposed this week by the world’s largest airline association

Marketing BS. They've dictated their new preferred size.

I bought a Rimowa "CABIN TROLLEY IATA" several years ago with the intention of having it for life. IATA now tells me it's 5cm too wide.

Then they began talking with baggage manufacturers to urge them to start making bags that fit the parameters

Surely that should read:

they began conspiring with baggage manufacturers

From IATA's website:

Environmental responsibility in aviation is IATA's promise to the 2.2 billion people who fly each year.

But let's ignore the mountains of landfill they have just "proposed"

4 ( +6 / -2 )

JeffLeeJun. 11, 2015 - 07:22AM JST I go to Thailand, etc. with a single bag that small for trips up to 3 weeks. It carries everything I need, including snorkel gear and laptop. I can't figure out why nearly all my fellow Japanese passengers have full-sized suitcases PLUS carry ons, especially since their average stay is 5 days.

I assume that would be because not everyone enjoys wearing the same clothes for their entire trip, and some might have other things on their program than bumming on the beach for three weeks.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Instead of making rules for smaller carryons, how about increasing personal space. Its 2015 ffs and we still fly around in sardinecans.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

It drives me nuts when I get to my seat to find someone has used up all the space with their duty free and over-sized bags.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Yeah, travel a lot, have gotten fairly good at keep things, especially carry on compact.

It does annoy me when people have tons of duty free, or clearly large bags which then get pushed and shoved into my backpack containing the 2 laptops I need for work.

A bit of care and consideration would go a long way in this world, sadly as so many seem incapable of thinking about anyone but themselves we need rules..

However in this case, one carry on, not carry-on, plus handbag the size of a small suitcase, plus massive jacket that couldn't fit in the checked luggage any more, plus a whole bunch of duty free, is something I could get behind.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@JeffLee: "I go to Thailand, etc. with a single bag that small for trips up to 3 weeks. It carries everything I need, including snorkel gear and laptop."

Not everyone wears a male thong, and only a male thong every day,,,

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Current sizing for most airlines:

23 cm x 40 cm x 55 cm (9 in x 15.5 in x 21.5 in)

Proposed new 'perfect' size:

20 cm x 35 cm x 55 cm (7.5 in x 13.5 in x 21 in)

So a reduction in volume from 50,600 cm3 to 38,500 cm3, or a one-quarter reduction. Perfect for the airline, maybe

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

How about this, get rid of the baggage surcharges since the price of fuel is cheaper yet they still get to charge it and people will begin to check their baggage instead of trying to beat the $50/$100 "fees" (i.e. subsidy) that the arilines can impose but pay not taxes on.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

@NZ2011 Yes, if airlines actually were strict about carry on bags there would be room in the bins for everyone. Huge wheeled suitcases, numerous duty free boxes and handbags the size of futons seem to be the norm. Some airlines are better than others, but people think the entire contents of the duty free shops after airport security don't count and it's often those purchases that are the worst culprits for taking up cabin space. I think if your cabin bag is so big or heavy that it need to be on wheels then it should be in the hold. There are supposed to be weight as well as size limits for hand luggage.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Per seat there should be one overhead locker of standard dimensions with the seat number marked on it. This would end the boarding rush and anxiety of finding space for one's carry-on(s).

4 ( +5 / -1 )

"However, this label will only be available on new bags, and not for travelers that may already have an ideally sized bag in their collection."

Ummm... yeah. Obvious cash grab, and that's all it is. Doesn't matter if you just bought the bag a while ago, they want you to buy it again so you can get a seal on it that says "Okay!" Then if you don't have the new bag, which I'm guessing isn't cheap, and they even just suggest the bag is too big, you pay a fine. Doesn't matter that they've barely lowered the costs of the fuel surcharge despite oil dropping tremendously, they want to screw you here, too.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Don't bother buying new bags, in a few years the airlines will have decreased the size to the same size as the image... if you're viewing on your iphone screen.

This is just another move by airlines to cram more people into the same space. Mooo!!!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Probably the best is to order the "IATA OK" stickers and have them sewn.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

My airline allows me my check-in luggage, my cabin bag (small backpack) and an accessory (my laptop) for long haul flights.I never have to check in my backpack and it's never been measured. I normally carry my camera, CD player and MP3 player in there ... along with nibbles and a book and/or magazine.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I just bought two carry on size backpacks that cost me USD280 in all, they just arrived yesterday. I was so happy!! Now I read this!! I wanted to save money too!!!!! So pissed!!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

papigiulioJUN. 11, 2015 - 12:00PM JST Instead of making rules for smaller carryons, how about increasing personal space. Its 2015 ffs and we still fly around in sardinecans.

Well, that wasn't the case even in coach/economy prior to about 2000.

The worst thing that happened to the airline industry was deregulation. I'd love to see the FAA in the U.S. set standards for passenger "comfort" and, actually, getting back to the days, particularly on long hauls, of minimal carry-ons. International flights are the worst for this.

Make all international carriers conform to the same cabin lay-outs in coach and then let the airlines compete on service and price. I'd willingly pay a hundred bucks more for a West Coast to Tokyo flight for one less seat across and three fewer rows.

None of this matter much for flights of three hours or less.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Duty Free are all placed in the ramp before entering the plane. Why not put those in with baggage and hand them out at the carousel after landing? It is not like they are going to break out the Johnny Walker Blue in the cabin.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I never carry a hard case suitcase on the plane and just put everything in a larger suitcase. It's much nicer to travel hands free with just a small softbag you can set under the set with snacks etc.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Must suck to be one of those luggage shops. All their stock will now be obsolete and worthless.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Bottom line: a 24% reduction in size + cost for customer. Good for airline, costly and not so good for passenger.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

When I first arrived in Japan, I notice the backpacks worn by the elementary kids. I found out more about these packs call Ransel. 3 years ago I final purchased a black leather Ransel with longer shoulder straps. I use it all the time. I use it for work and short flights and trips. It is the best bag I have ever owned. It is so versatile and a great talking point.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I found out more about these packs call Ransel

They are called randoseru - the word comes from ransel, but randoseru are their own thing.

3 years ago I final purchased a black leather Ransel with longer shoulder straps. I use it all the time.

I'd say you're probably the only adult in this entire country that is wearing one.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

What a scam. If airlines cared they would designate apprtoved space for each seat and label it so. Then up to passenger to find space for their stuff. If they can't into the hold it goes. i travel a lot and manage with just cabin baggage. but am amzed at the size of some of the folks cabin stuff. Add duty free and it is clear why not everyone can fit.

For those who hate arriving and finding all locker space taken, answer is to arrive earlier......

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Please increase the size of overhead luggage compartment. Please don't ask for cabin baggage replacement. Please respect the passengers cabin luggage.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Gaijin: Please increase the size of overhead luggage compartment. Please don't ask for cabin baggage replacement. Please respect the passengers cabin luggage.

I don't think saying "please" to airlines works, unless you're talking directly to phone or counter agents. Who'd have no affect on the size of the compartments.

Now, flash mobs, set to reward good airlines by purchasing tickets from them, and punish bad airlines by boycotting them, those might work.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Please increase the size of overhead luggage compartment. Please don't ask for cabin baggage replacement. Please respect the passengers cabin luggage.

Airbus are increasing the size of their overhead compartments. From the BBC yesterday:

IATA is only a trade body and can't enforce its regulations, he adds. But a smaller per-passenger capacity could save airlines time in dealing with excess cabin luggage, "and time is money", Learmount says.

Some operators use planes with a smaller capacity than the 120 passengers mentioned in IATA's guidelines. But standard Boeing 737s and Airbus A320s are bigger than this, meaning they would be covered.

Airbus is increasing the width of overhead lockers on A320s from next year, to accommodate more bags which are the US Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) "standard" size - 55.8cm x 36.8cm x 22.9cm - or even slightly larger. Up to eight could fit in a single section if laid next to each other on their sides, it says, meaning 60% more total cabin luggage could be stored.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Wow! Windmuller is up for a major bonus. Airlines are just going to rake it in. Think. How many people can get by with such a small case? Anything else is freebies for the airlines.. You know the CEOs, etc need their bonuses, too.

BTW, how much is WiFi on a flight? Years ago I read a guy figured out how to enable WiFi on flights for a $1,000 contraption on each airplane. If airlines can't make ends meet now, with all their windfall earnings, then we'll never find economic stability on airlines.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Pointless to have this one "ideal" carry on when every plane I take has masses of people stuffing all manner of huge duty free bags & cardboard boxes with appliances up in the stowage area. A little more policing by ground staff at the gate & this change wouldn't be required.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"the sizing bins many airlines place near the gates are “ridiculous.”

No, but the amount of carry-on luggage many passengers take onto planes IS ridiculous.

I remember one United Airlines flight attendant who couldn't get an overstuffed overhead bin to close berating passengers, saying, "If you people had listened to my instructions, this wouldn't happen!" lol

1 ( +1 / -0 )

People with oversized and overweight luggage are endangered the lives of all other passengers they travel with. Having a standard size bag is not such a bad idea. Also weight limitation is really important because although airlines do accommodate adequate weights for every passenger we never know what might happen up in the air. We all need to respect air travel and abide by the rules and regulations for safe and comfortable travel...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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