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Photo: @naagaoshi
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Breathtaking photos of one of Japan’s most beautiful hot springs have us ready to brave the snow

4 Comments
By Casey Baseel, SoraNews24

Many onsen aficionados will tell you that midwinter is the best time to visit one of Japan’s hot springs. Not only is a good long soak a great way to take the icy chill out of your bones, the streets of many hot spring towns are lined with traditional architecture, with storefronts and inn facades often sticking as close as possible to centuries-old aesthetics.

When night and snow fall at the same time, it sometimes cuts off the remaining reminders in the surrounding scenery that it’s the 21st century, and for a moment, you can feel like you’ve stepped into a bygone era of Japan’s past, which is definitely the effect of these photos from Japanese photographer and Twitter user @naagaoshi.

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Yes, the gas lamp-style streetlights mean these images couldn’t have come to us from ancient Japan, but they certainly look a few generations older than their real age of only a few weeks. They almost don’t look like they’re from our world at all, seeming like they could have just as easily sprung out of a picture book, but they were indeed taken at a real-world location, as @naagaoshi traveled to Ginzan Onsen, a hot spring resort in the northeastern Tohoku region’s Yamagata Prefecture, earlier this month.

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Photo: @naagaoshi

There’s already an undeniably romantic atmosphere to the snowy scenery bathed in soft light, but the above shot, which the kimono-clad young woman agreed to let @naagaoshi take, is many commenters’ favorite, with her turned back lending an aura of quiet mystery.

▼ Elsewhere, a couple strolls through the snow.

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If these beautifully icy photos have given you a burning desire to visit Ginzan Onsen when it looks like this, you’ll be happy to know that winters are long in Yamagata, and as of this writing, the seven-day forecast for the town lists snow on no fewer than four days, plus daytime high temperatures rarely reaching zero degrees Celsius, to make those warm baths feel all the more heavenly.

Source: @naagaoshi via IT Media

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

-- Snow falling at Ginzan Hot Spring has Twitter in awe with its otherworldly beauty 【Photos】

-- Japanese hot spring will wrap your face in gold leaf for the ultimate luxury facial

-- 7 incredible Japanese destinations that tourists haven’t discovered yet

© SoraNews24

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

4 Comments
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Its a great view but only about 100m long. On Google Street View, it looks like the photographer must be standing next to a five storey reinforced concrete building out of shot to the left.

To the right of the gaslight, and mostly out of shot, is the place that was famous for a while for having an American okami san (manageress/owner) who became one of the most visible gaijin in Japan. The couple have since split, so she's not around now.

Oh, and that's a yukata, not a kimono, but never mind.

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Oh, and that's a yukata, not a kimono

A yukata is a type of kimono:

浴衣は夏に着る最もラフな着物で、元々は湯上りに着る室内着でした

Yukata are a rough kimono worn in summer, that traditionally were worn indoors after getting out of hot water.

Source: https://kotobank.jp/word/%E6%B5%B4%E8%A1%A3-651420

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But if you are using wider definitions, a 着物 is a 身につけて着るもの。衣服。It simply means "clothing". Even when taken in a slightly narrower definition to mean Japanese clothing, it includes a jimbe, for example, which has trousers. From kotobank.

甚平(じんぺい),〈じんべ〉 男性や子ども用の夏の着物

Common usage in Japan says the thing you wear after a bath or in summer is a yukata. I think you'd throw a lot of hotel staff if you asked for a "kimono".

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I agree with what you say, but I'm just pointing out that technically, a yukata is a kimono.

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