Photo: Tri Phan
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Fujisato: Hiking, waterfalls and tasty lamb

6 Comments

Shrouded in the valleys of northern Akita, the town of Fujisato is a gateway to one of Japan’s first UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Shirakami Sanchi. This charming town is famous for its diverse hiking trails, fishing spots, Suffolk lamb, and enchanting waterfalls. It’s the perfect spot to mark on a Tohoku road trip.

Shirakami Sanchi

SHIRAKAMI-SANCHI-World-Heritage-Akita.jpg
An anime-inspiring forest adventure awaits.

Just near the town center, the Shirakami Sanchi World Heritage Conservation Center Fujisato Kan (Map) is a great starting point if you’re considering a day of hiking in Fujisato’s prestigious woods. You can learn more about the forest’s history and ecosystem through maps, pictures, and English descriptions. 

Shirakami Sanchi’s ancient forest partly inspired one of Studio Ghibli’s most famous films, Princess Mononoke.  

As the largest remaining beech tree forest in East Asia, Shirakami Sanchi was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1993 after locals protested a planned road that would cut through its woods. Today, much of the forest is protected and inaccessible. Luckily, a few trails in Fujisato wrap around the restricted zone, and any nature lover worth their salt would be remiss to pass them up.

For the anime fans, Shirakami Sanchi’s ancient forest partly inspired one of Studio Ghibli’s most famous films, Princess Mononoke.  

Click here to read more

© GaijinPot Travel

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6 Comments
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looks gorgeous. Never been to Akita. Went to Iwate once around 20 years ago. It was gorgeous.

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One of several places in Japan that inspired Princess Mononoke, all beautiful.

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This looks like some of the gorgeous scenary I've seen and drove thru while on vacation in Quebec Province and New England last year. Very beautiful.

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There is always the danger of concrete public works project in Japan; however one thing that makes this country interesting and unlike any other place is the tiny and atmospheric shrines and temples that dot the mountainscapes.

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registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1993 after locals protested a planned road that would cut through its woods.

Sounds lovely. The story behind how the locals saved the forest sounds like a very interesting story.

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Osaka_DougOct. 9  06:30 am JST

registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1993 after locals protested a planned road that would cut through its woods.

Sounds lovely. The story behind how the locals saved the forest sounds like a very interesting story.

And I like lamb in so many ways, but I've never had it Japanese style yet. I'd like to.

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