travel

How 9/11 changed air travel: more security, less privacy

14 Comments
By DAVID KOENIG

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“The point about taking shoes off because of one incident on a plane seems somewhat on the extreme side,"

This ridiculousness is mainly a US thing.

In non-US airports for non-US flights its not done, except if a passenger is on a flight bound for the US.

Many times I've had to take off my shoes in Narita on flights to the US, but the guy behind me bound for Thailand, does not. As if a would-be terrorist does not realize this, and simply devise a plan to change shoes with someone else after the security check.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Post 9/11 measures, Post Covid measures, … International Flights are still a great convenience people no longer regard as really something remarkable. Will play by ‘your rules’ as long as travel internationally remains an option for ALL people and not just the elites.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Point followed until

*- “simply devise a plan to change shoes with someone else after the security check.” *

Don’t those going through the US bound flights go directly to specific gates and remain separate from others traveling to other destinations abroad? It not, then it’s just pointless ‘theatrics’ to make people feel better.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Don’t those going through the US bound flights go directly to specific gates and remain separate from others traveling to other destinations abroad?

Nope. All passengers go through the same security together, and then go to the same duty-free shops, the same McDonalds, and the same toilets in the same departure lounge. There is no hint of segregation for US bound passengers.

Actually, if coming simply through Japan on a connecting flight that originated elsewhere (say China) with a final destination elsewhere (say the US), all passengers must first go through a security check upon landing in Japan after exiting the plane to get into the departure lounge. And again, if your final destination is the US (the "guards" check your ticket) you gotta take off your shoes, but if your destination is for elsewhere in the world, you do not.

Yes, it’s just pointless ‘theatrics’.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

They forgot to mention the intrusiveness of fingerprinting. That came in mostly after 9/11. Still don't get how fingerprinting someone will prevent a suicide bombing attempt. That part is pure security theater

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 It not, then it’s just pointless ‘theatrics’ to make people feel better.

Yes this, mostly.

While I am sure the security measures do catch people here or there, any concentrated effort to bypass them would probably work. There has been several times I accidentally left prohibited materials in my bag, and only realized later on the flight that they should have been found and confiscated.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Roll forward 5 years and I'll bet you might be able to write a similar article about Covid related requirements and intrusiveness being a part of "normal" life.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Roll forward 5 years and I'll bet you might be able to write a similar article about Covid related requirements and intrusiveness being a part of "normal" life.

You won't. A virus is not politically motivated. You can't check the shoes of a virus or ask how much liquid it has on its person. Its response will be: I am a virus and I will try to kill you.

So you're barking up the wrong tree. When you learn what a virus is, and what germs are, things will go more easily for you.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Post 9/11 measures, Post Covid measures, … International Flights are still a great convenience people no longer regard as really something remarkable.

Guess we’ll ALL have to play by ‘their rules’ as long as travelling internationally remains an option for ALL people and NOT just the elites.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

snowy, I have to say, I don't understand the emphasis, whether bold or italic, that you put on some of the posts that you write.

And who are "they"? Those rules are we following? The governments of sovereign nations? I mean, yeah. You have to. That's how laws work.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I remember when I first started travelling to the US from the UK when flights were still considered to be something with big seats and great service. On arrival flash my British passport, stamped and waved straight through.

All now confined to the history books of air travel.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Acknowledged @Exsister 2:58p.

No bold statements there, just emphasizing “as long as international travel remains an option for everyone”.

They” being those who permit our travel: the airlines, the laws & governments of the nations we may choose to visit.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

As @zichi 3:07p posts, the casualness and ‘freedoms’ we felt in the past traveling abroad may have now been changed forever.

Agreed @zichi. Macau & Hong Kong no longer “stamped” the passport I upgraded with additional pages in 2019. They give a loose, thermal-paper type ‘receipt’ that as all but faded.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

They” being those who permit our travel: the airlines, the laws & governments of the nations we may choose to visit.

Well, yeah. Airlines are private businesses, and can set their own rules. Governments are sovereign, and can set their own laws.

I hate to tell you, friend, but this is how the world works.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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