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Hyatt will remove small bottles from hotel bathrooms by 2021

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Of course the water bottles is a no brainer, but they could switch to small waxed paper packages for the bathrooms. People aren’t gonna like this when they charge premium prices for their rooms.

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When we were in Japan in May there were no small bottles of shampoo, etc. in any of the hotels we stayed in. Just huge containers of something cheap - but then we don't stay in Hyatts. Budget hotels are more our style.

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When we were in Japan in May there were no small bottles of shampoo, etc. in any of the hotels we stayed in. Just huge containers of something cheap - but then we don't stay in Hyatts. Budget hotels are more our style.

My wife and I have stayed in budget hotels throughout Japan roughly 70 times this year. There are no small bottles. The large push-bottle type containers of shampoo, rinse and face/body soap in the majority of cases were manufactured by Pola, an upper market brand.

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There's no reason to place such toiletries in every room in hotels. If upscale places don't want to install the large, wall-mounted options (which is easily done with luxury brands as well), they could offer the customer a toiletries package at check-in for a low fee.

I don't know about other people, but I always carry my own preferred brands in the 100ml size allowed by airlines. Those easily last 2 to 3 weeks which covers most travel itineraries.

If guests have forgotten toiletries, Japan which has a combini within a short distance and sometimes within the hotel complex itself; therefore this perk isn't strictly necessary. Recognizing that it is not environmentally friendly and working to change the disposable culture which has been allowed for decades is a good thing.

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