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Do you think geothermal energy is a practical power source in Japan?

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not by itself- but in combination with solar power and wind, it can

BTW, the state of California is able to produce OVER 100% of its energy from solar alone.

On a mild Sunday afternoon, California set a historic milestone in the quest for clean energy. The sun was shining, the wind was blowing and on May 8th, the state produced enough renewable electricity to meet 103% of consumer demand. That broke a record set a week earlier of 99.9%.

Energy experts say the falling records are a sign of the remarkable progress that renewable energy has made.

On April 30th, solar, wind and other renewables provided enough electricity to meet the needs within California’s Independent System Operator, which supplies about 80% of the state. More power was being generated at the time than was needed, so some was sent to other states.

California is breaking renewable energy records, but fossil fuels aren't fading : NPR

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

sorry- I stand corrected.

the article says renewables- not solar alone.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

lets look around you say Iceland...dont need to invent anything new just learn from others.

sure it may be very helpful with some investment...

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I think it very helpful for Japan's low level of producing electric power as there are plenty of resources in geothermal energy into the ground around the country. Increasing the number of wind farms is also an ideal solution, however, since this country is surrounded by deep trenches, so it is difficult to build lots of them using sea wind. On the other hand, as we see on the geographical map of Japan, there countless numbers of the spots of hot spring. It is an ideal condition which means a sea of natural energy deep into the ground. Nevertheless, the reason of not having built the facilities to produce electric power from thermal energy is the cost. The ground needs to be drilled so carefully that earthquakes are not caused and natural water sources are shuttered. Therefore, building work requires lots of special knowledge and expensive equipment, making it costly.

Finding out how to produce energy is one of must-be-solved problems in our country, thus the government needs to pay more attention on how geothermal energy is build and used efficiently and to give more financial support for related companies and research institutes.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Japan has had geothermal plants for a long time. Local resident resistance was so high that construction stopped was stopped decades ago.

Everyone wants power but no one wants it generated in their backyard.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

It's a crime that they haven't developed geothermal power here. The resistance was mostly regarding onsens - they were worried that their business might be affected, though geothermal power plants are relatively unobtrusive and far less harmful than hydropower or coal plants.

The irony is that Japanese power companies build geothermal plants in other countries. They have the tech, the experience and the ability. Just not the consent.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Yes! With a proper arrangement it can become a real lifesaver!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Well here I go to a new level of down votes.

Geothermal in Japan is probably the most logical way to go.

Japan has the 3rd largest and easily accessible geothermal resources after the USA and Indonesia, a potential of 23,000 Megawatts.

This is enough to power the country.

Drawbacks are higher investment at first, and most of the best sites are located in national parks.

But if done correctly, once the main infrastructure has been done corrective measures can be taken to return the area as is was before leaving only a tiny presence.

The actual turbines can be located further away only the pipes need to remain.

Now where I am going to get the hate!

Solar the environmentalists love child, is the worst way to go, sorry facts are facts.

Poor efficiency should be the first red flag, average 20% conversion.

( Wind 60% to 90% power conversion)

Solar Only work in the day (wind works 24/7 yes needs a breeze but today's models start functioning at very low wind also you get far more wind hours compared to daylight per year.

Solar requires far far far to much space for the tiny energy return.

24 panels requires 38 m2 to produce 5kw (if the sun is out) that same surface area could hold 3 to 5.5kw wind turbines (the smallest on the market right now) but 1 or 2 much larger would be more efficient use of the space. So same space a minimum of 3 times the energy production. (Probably far more considering now night time power for solar).

The production cost, environmental cost to produce 24 solar panels compared to a 5.5 kW wind turbine are very different, with solar being far more costly environmentally, on paper the base cost in money solar is lower, if full environmental impact was taken into account it is devastating to the environment.

Newer wimd turbines are now being produced with little or no major need for rare earth metals/magnets (thank Japan as Toyota/Panasonic and Hokkaido university developed iron based magnets as strong and effective as rare earth ones).

So in conclusion wind, geothermal are the best choices for Japan, abundance of both wind and geothermal plenty of high mountains and coastline where wind nearly never stops and less land use.

For Japan to go solar would take more land than all the rest combined and produce far less energy.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Iceland does well with geothermal but has a small population. For electric, its only 25% of 300,000 people's power.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geothermal_power_in_Iceland

The thing with home heating is that a huge part of it can be avoided with insulation, which also reduces cooling need in summer. Houses that stay at a comfortable temperature also keep their occupants healthier and older people genkier, which means less money needs to be spent on healthcare.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Japan does not have any kind of special situation that would prevent it from being useful, so it can be used the same as in other places in the world.

It would not solve by itself the problem of energy production, but it would help in decreasing the dependency in fossil energy sources and apparently requires less resources to be put in order and if done correctly have a lower ecological impact. It is not easy to understand why it has not been used in Japan where it is a natural choice.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Kagoshima has many geothermal power generating plants. The Yamagawa plant has an excellent tour if you're in the area (and you should visit: the area is stunningly beautiful). https://www.kyuden.co.jp/effort_geothermal_t_yamagawa.html

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Laguna

Today 02:21 pm JST

Kagoshima has many geothermal power generating plants. The Yamagawa plant has an excellent tour if you're in the area (and you should visit: the area is stunningly beautiful). https://www.kyuden.co.jp/effort_geothermal_t_yamagawa.html

I would not call it many.

The total geothermal output in all of Japan is 600 megawatt out of a potential of 23,000 megawatts.

To give an idea of how little that is.

New Zealand and the Philippines have far less potential or available areas for geothermal energy production but produce more than the 600 megawatts all of Japan does.

So I doubt Kagoshima has what can be called "many".

0 ( +0 / -0 )

New Zealand and the Philippines have far less potential or available areas for geothermal energy production but produce more than the 600 megawatts all of Japan does.

And at least a couple of those geothermal plants in the Philippines were build by Japanese power companies. Time to put them to work at home - Japan is far too reliant on imported oil.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

No, of course not.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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