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Foreign and domestic tourists in Kyoto are complaining about overcrowded tourist sites, not enough bus services, traffic jams, while local residents complain about the bad manners of some visitors. What can be done about this problem?

21 Comments

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I’ll tell you one thing...nothing can be done about the snobs in Kyoto.

They are rich from tourism, so you gotta also deal with it.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

I’ll tell you one thing...nothing can be done about the snobs in Kyoto.

They are rich from tourism, so you gotta also deal with it.

Not all Kyoto people are snobs and an awful lot of them have nothing to do with the tourism industry.

I don't expect Japan to follow other cities' lead but Venice has some intriguing ideas about how to deal with the hordes:

Venice has come up with a new plan to cope with the huge numbers of visitors that continue to strain its infrastructure: segregating locals and tourists.

Ahead of one of the biggest holiday weekends of the year, this popular city in Italy is implementing new measures that will restrict the movement of visitors and turn away some motorists.

The extraordinary move is the latest step by Venice to manage high levels of tourism that in recent years have led to calls to ban cruise ships and restrict visitor numbers ... Mayor Luigi Brugnaro says "urgent measures to guarantee public safety, security and liveability" will be implemented.

https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/venice-separates-tourists-and-locals/index.html

As someone who used to enjoy Kyoto, I hope they figure it out.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Tax kyoto visitors, pass savings to residents... tell snobs to chill and improve transport and so on...

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Charge visitors an entrance fee to Kyoto, have staff in various mascot/character costumes around town to keep people amused and help visitors out, dish out fast passes to the attractions for set times........oh

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

First, tell people there are a lot of other interesting places in Japan.

Second, promote small "Little Kyoto" towns, which can offer a great experience as well, and need more tourism to sustain themselves.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

There are times to visit Kyoto when there are less crowds. Choosing the right locations and whether you can avoid buses to get there and use subways and trains. We visited the Imperial Palace in March for the plum blossom and was surprised how few visitors there were.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

This is a global problem. The only way to deal with it is to take measures to control the number and flow of visitors in busy areas. In Amsterdam many museums now only allow admission with a pre-booked ticket, that way the numbers per hour are controlled and it's less crowded. The number of tour buses should be restricted too, only so many per day.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

'Kyoto Pass' Limited Tickets for Tourists. Only those who can obtained through proper locally authorised tourist shops can pass through (to be checked at big Kyoto Entrance Gates (East, South, West & North) surrounded by the barriers in square or circle.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

I was in Kyoto in late November to see the changing of the leaves back in 1998. It was so crowded and a taxi driver tried to drive through a street full of tourists. Someone gave a look of disdained as he honked his kurakushon and he shouted obscenities. Must be much worse now.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Bintaro nails it. Slay the myth that you have to go to Kyoto to see or experience traditional Japanese culture. It will also help the rest of the country.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

There are snobs in Kyoto? Did not know that. Never been there. Just seen Kyoto through blogs and pictures. That will do I guess.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

For gods sake, RENT a bike! Avoid using the bus. You can see more and over bigger distances without having to worry about the crowd.

First, tell people there are a lot of other interesting places in Japan.

And this!

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Tourist shuttle buses from Kyoto JR station paid for by the tourist site and the tourist passengers. Ban backpacks and suitcases.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Tourists bring money and problems. If the streets were bare you would want em back.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Kyoto tourism generates ¥1 trillion for the city. 70% of the tourists are domestic.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Ha ha!

Nothing will be done because nobody wants to throttle the Golden Goose.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Nothing can be done.  Especially about bad manners.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Cut back on school outings to the major sites. Show students videos of Kyoto's main attractions instead. Take kids from urban areas on trips to the countryside.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

More money, more problems!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Lived in Kyoto for a bit. Here is my advice for savvy tourists: If you want to visit a popular spot, do so before or at dawn (most are temples and thus never actually close); not only will they be desolate of anyone but the locals, there is a deeper spiritual feeling. Then, during the day, visit one of the plentiful locations off the tourist track - few people will be there, and many of these hidden gems are better than the more popular locations anyway. Just talk with a local.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Alex EinzJuly 10  08:24 am JST Tax kyoto visitors, pass savings to residents... tell snobs to chill and improve transport and so on...

So in addition to paying for their transportation to and around Kyoto, food and drink, souvenirs, hotels, which already include a per night tax and entrance fees to visit many tourist sites, you want them to pay an additional tax?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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