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If you currently live in Japan, do you think you will, or would like to spend the rest of your life here?

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Of course

-5 ( +6 / -11 )

No way.

1 ( +12 / -11 )

If you currently live in Japan, do you think you will,

yes

or would like to spend the rest of your life here?

no

1 ( +15 / -14 )

Undecided. I come from one of the least affordable places on Earth, Canada, so Japan with its low cost of living is very appealing financially.

However, Japan's worseningly mind-numbing rules and regulations and the prospect of higher taxes and healthcare costs may soon offset that advantage.

Also, most Japanese are socially inhibited (strangers rarely talk casually with each other, etc ) so alienation and loneliness are other factors to consider.

1 ( +26 / -25 )

Yes to both. Not that much time left. 10-20 maybe.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

If you currently live in Japan, do you think you will,

yes

or would like to spend the rest of your life here?

no

this explains so much...

11 ( +20 / -9 )

JeffLee

Also, most Japanese are socially inhibited (strangers rarely talk casually with each other, etc ) so alienation and loneliness are other factors to consider.

That is not true in all locations. Not at our last and not in our current one. Find the right location to retire.

9 ( +15 / -6 )

I could see myself living in Japan until I'm old and grey but I will return to my homeland from time to time. Japan is a good home, but there's nothing like where you were born.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Will keep a vacation place here and live several other places same as pre COVID.

-9 ( +6 / -15 )

Yes of course, it’s home.

I don’t understand the folk saying it’s hard to make friends here.

15 ( +25 / -10 )

Also, most Japanese are socially inhibited (strangers rarely talk casually with each other, etc ) so alienation and loneliness are other factors to consider.

Japanese aren't so different to many European countries including the UK, yet people don't seem to complain about the British or Germans etc... In these countries the locals don't consider small talk to be a sign of friendliness. Loneliness is more likely to be a sign of you personally than of the Japanese.

11 ( +23 / -12 )

I agree with cleo.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

However, Japan's worseningly mind-numbing rules and regulations and the prospect of higher taxes and healthcare costs may soon offset that advantage.

I would say it already has. Don't get me wrong. Canada has its issues, BUT all in all, I would say it is a far better pick than Japan. Just from where I'm standing. To each his own.

Also, most Japanese are socially inhibited (strangers rarely talk casually with each other, etc ) so alienation and loneliness are other factors to consider.

Very true, and I would say the pandemic exacerbated that particular trait among them.

 But the frustration of living in such an unfriendly uptight country, along with the terrible loneliness, is becoming truly debilitating, and I have to do something before I go nuts.

I hear you loud and clear.

-16 ( +13 / -29 )

Long story short: I am staying here both out of choice (happy about that) but and at the same time out of a lack of a choice (feel pretty strange about that part, "sho ga nai" may be the best way to describe the feeling...).

While I am trying to make the best out of things at my own level, those actually running the show, whether out of ineptitude, malice or otherwise, aren't, hence never-ending frustration and anxiety are piling up.

Now, a side-question may actually be: would you recommend coming to Japan?

My answer would be a resounding "NO". At best, things are the same as abroad (albeit in a different way). At worse, many more (and different) problems are piling up. Hence, at best a zero-sum game, at worst a losing game.

blue- as usual. Excellent post. I agree with you 100%.

-18 ( +12 / -30 )

Our kids are probably going to be here, so why not?

The UK has gone down the toilet. Why would I go back to a country where it takes two weeks to see a doctor unless you bother the A&E people? I hurt my back a couple of weeks ago and got X rayed twice at two hospitals, first a general clinic and then an orthopedics specialist, both times within an hour of turning up as a walk in. In the UK, I would be necking huge amounts of OTC painkillers waiting for my first turn to see someone.

9 ( +14 / -5 )

Yes, I live in Japan. Retiring here? I'm not sure. There are lots of great things about retiring here. However, at the same time, I have to think of my family, too. I have 3 kids, one of whom is studying and likes it in the US. I think my other 2 will follow in her footsteps. It's true that I have to live my life for myself, but they come first. I'm sure that I might be back in the US, in my hometown during my last days. I really do love my hometown.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Speaking from someone who is semi-retired. Get out of the big city and next to the sea/countryside. Costs are cheaper. People are more friendly. The property is bigger and cheaper.

Medical expenses are less and limited for all retired. The cost of a stay in the hospital is limited to ¥35,000/month unless you have a large pension. Medical expenses are only 20%. Find an area which takes care of its old people. We have community taxis and buses. Welfare workers who home visit. Free health checks. Free tickets for the community bus. Lots of positives.

Last week I went to my local dentist, a great guy. Charged me ¥700 for one hour of work.

You will need upwards of ¥20-¥30 million in savings.

11 ( +15 / -4 )

I might stay but it would only be because all the other things I have planned didn't go right or due to some kind of incapacitation. I certainly DON'T want to stay.

-2 ( +8 / -10 )

Will not spend the rest of my life here and currently do not spend all my time here.

For anyone elderly though, I suggest staying in the big cities because the healthcare in the more rural areas in Japan just do not compete to what is offered in big city hospitals and even clinics.

Just got back from Thailand, Singapore and Malaysia. Cannot think of much that Japan has that those other countries do not.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Japanese aren't so different to many European countries including the UK, yet people don't seem to complain about the British or Germans etc... In these countries the locals don't consider small talk to be a sign of friendliness

I don’t think so. The Brits don’t generally have the warmness and openness of say, the Spanish, Italians or Americans but small talk among Brits is common - particularly in the northern part of England where I’m from.

Many Japanese themselves admit they are socially awkward, particularly with foreigners - often calling themselves ‘shy’. In my experience, the Japanese people most open and less awkward around foreigners were living in an area of Tokyo with a large foreign population. Maybe just more used to them.

But the frustration of living in such an unfriendly uptight country

I remember my wife and I returned to Japan after a trip to Spain and Portugal - the comedown was so heavy. I chatted to more people in a week in English/broken English/crap Spanish in a week there than in an average year in Japan despite me having pretty high Japanese proficiency. Totally different vibe.

Still, there are many decent people in Japan and it has its good points, but if you are looking for friendly, easygoing people, it isn’t the best.

Many Japanese will tell you that.

8 ( +20 / -12 )

There are no problems with the hospitals in our seaside location. Well staffed and well equipped. Last year a brand new 800-bed hospital opened. You can go anywhere for healthcare.

I had my cancer op in a hospital 100 km from where we live. Booked a suit and my spouse stayed for the week too.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

You will need upwards of ¥20-¥30 million in savings.

Is that estimate for people with no pension?

>

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Elvis

no that is my estimate for people who will only have a national pension plus limited company pension. You really need to have a company pension for more than 25 years. If the total pensions will be less than ¥200,000 per month, then those figures are in the ballpark.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Speaking from someone who is semi-retired. Get out of the big city and next to the sea/countryside. Costs are cheaper. People are more friendly. The property is bigger and cheaper.

Medical expenses are less and limited for all retired. The cost of a stay in the hospital is limited to ¥35,000/month unless you have a large pension. Medical expenses are only 20%. Find an area which takes care of its old people. We have community taxis and buses. Welfare workers who home visit. Free health checks. Free tickets for the community bus. Lots of positives.

Last week I went to my local dentist, a great guy. Charged me ¥700 for one hour of work.

You will need upwards of ¥20-¥30 million in savings.

To hell with retirement. That sounds like somewhere I'd love to live now!

2 ( +7 / -5 )

wallaceToday  01:42 pm JST

Speaking from someone who is semi-retired. Get out of the big city and next to the sea/countryside. Costs are cheaper. People are more friendly. The property is bigger and cheaper.

Medical expenses are less and limited for all retired. The cost of a stay in the hospital is limited to ¥35,000/month unless you have a large pension.

If someone were relegated to long term hospital care in Japan, godspeed to them.

If the elderly want a nursing-type home, with rehabilitation, and weekly medical visits, expect to pay US3000 and up per month.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

In hospital the charge for long term care for old people is limited. Private care homes are more expensive.

The quote of $3,000 is the very high end and can be much less.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Both my parents went through private US care homes towards the end of their lives. My dad was in the home first - the cost was upwards of $6k monthly, with bland food and barebones interaction with staff. We took our mom to a different home in the same city, similar specs, but with similar results. These two locations were supposed to be the better ones in the state.

I then compare this to my wife's parents who are now in a care home in Japan - night and day different. We went for a visit recently, and the food, the staff interaction, the variety of activities, etc. were so different. I really wish I knew about this difference in care and quality of life so my parents could have gone to a facility in Japan. The price was quite a bit lower in Japan too.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

I will retire here and make Japan my base. 3 month on/off, but that not living here that taking advanage of a great situation, at the moment I am doing 3 months here and 9 months back home. I live here from 2009 to 2019 only went home on a feeling of a bad fire season and was correct then borders close. I came back to Japan January stay for 2 months back home now do family commitments, Caring for my ex wife and caring for our grand children 3 days a week until they are both settled in at school until then it will be 3 month in Japan 9 months back home.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

JeffLee...

Also, most Japanese are socially inhibited.

This is the only reason leading me to leave. The cultural lack of "real" social interaction. No community, at least in Tokyo.

5 ( +15 / -10 )

“ If you currently live in Japan, do you think you will, or would like to spend the rest of your life here? “

Probably yes and yes/it depends…;

the amount of lies, dishonesty and violence that exists around the world is unbelievable… there’s always some level of disorganization and dirtiness… plus eighty seven percent of the time you’ll have to deal with something called human stupidity…; from that perspective, Japan is definitely the best/second best/third best place to live. ( For ‘some reason’, it’s not easy to move to/live in Japan… )

Now the bad stuff: microaggressions, bullying, ignorance, mentalities, politicians, weather, salary/rent, Japanese tv… you can accept/ignore/avoid/learn how to live with most of these things.

note:

Also, most Japanese are socially inhibited (strangers rarely talk casually with each other, etc ) so alienation and loneliness are other factors to consider.

I disagree with this; that’s called minding your own business…; most Japanese can be extremely friendly.

6 ( +11 / -5 )

I'm Japanese, of course I will.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

I’ve done well in Japan, I came here with two suitcases 17 years ago, and moved into a 13 square meter apartment in Chiba. Today I have a business, a family and a dog, a large home with a view of Tokyo Tower, and two vacation homes. Will I return to America? The pleasant city I left in America is now overrun with homeless, crime has forced half the local businesses to move or close, 911 calls go unanswered, the public schools are public dumpster fires which are seeing so many kids pulled out by their parents that teachers are being laid off. I think I’ll stay if Japan will continue to have me

12 ( +17 / -5 )

No.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

San, running away from a problems, meaning,you never developed the backbone of being an American,I would not live any else but America

-13 ( +1 / -14 )

Roy: I said I will tired here and Japan will be my base 3/ months on 3 off but that only taking advantage of a great situation. From 2019 I had family commitments so at present I am caring for family until they settle into school. Then I be able to live here on. Tourist visa which mean flying back home and return

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Yrral

San, running away from a problems, meaning,you never developed the backbone of being an American,I would not live any else but America

That's pretty harsh.

OK, back at ya, you've never developed the understanding, or just don't care, that the current US government (since 1980's; minus Trump) is on a mission of hegemony and endless war, and never developed the backbone or conscience to reject that fact, and refuse to be a party to it. Unless you don't pay any taxes, then I could see why.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

No, my Japanese wife and I will not because the standard of living and safety and position of women in Japan is still in a developing stage, as is the freedom of the press, a fair judicial system and a modern education system that doesn't;t force shocked into a box.

Japan is the least happy place in the developed world

it can't compete in most other areas of life.

a) half of what you’re saying is **false**…; b) the other half hardly affects our daily lives.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

I'll probably retire here and move out of the city to a nearby coastal area with a bit land. Japan has its share of problems like anywhere else, but on the balance of it is an OK place to grow old IF you have a bit of money. If you're scraping by, it'd be pretty awful in old age.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

I love Japan and after 17 years here, I'm on my way out. I just can't do it anymore. 2021 and 2022 were awful years for me and made me take a decision.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Personally I don’t even have any alternative. With all the imported knife wielding migrants having taken over my former home country and a hemophilia disease, any other place would nowadays practically mean a death sentence for me.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

Sexual crimes are much higher in New Zealand than in Japan especially when comparing the sizes of the populations. I checked the figures. You are safer here.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Back on topic please.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I enjoy life in Kochi, surrounded with my J family, I have business interests in both Kochi and Nagoya.

I also appreciate being accepted into the local community.

Japan is home, there are times I miss London and face to face contact with my relatives in the UK.

This pandemic, in many respects added to the dilemma.

Would I like to spend the rest of my life here?

In all honesty I would like to, however who knows what the future holds?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I regard Japan as a base and although my business is growing, there are niggles here which force me to never think of Japan as my home.

Looking forward, there will be massive tax hikes causing lack of investment and there is a rapidly developing underclass forming which will lead to more crime.

I don’t see a bright future

-9 ( +6 / -15 )

I left. Most stifling country I've ever lived in - unnecessary, hinderous rules abound wrapped up in endless paperwork. Technologically backwards, especially when it comes to banking. People are polite and kind but in that distant superficial manner that comes across as insincere sometimes. I like Japan as a tourist and holiday destination but not as a candidate for living there long term.

-6 ( +14 / -20 )

I like Japan as a tourist and holiday destination but not as a candidate for living there long term

To be brutally honest, I think deep down most Japanese would like more non-Japanese to think this way although many would hesitate to say it, at least in front of non-Japanese.

People are polite and kind but in that distant superficial manner that comes across as insincere sometimes

I have heard Japanese people say the kind of immediate openness and friendliness you find in more welcoming cultures is insincere.

A sad way to look at human interaction.

-8 ( +6 / -14 )

Jimizo

I do not agree with your comments. I have been here 30 years and live in a place where there are no other foreigners. I have so many great relationships. I go to their homes for dinner parties and they come to ours. We make many activities together. I have visitors every week. Some for a chat others to bring me something like vegetables.

If I need a lift somewhere they are very happy to provide it. They took me to the hospitals numerous times during my cancer period. One even drove me 100 km to the hospital for my op. And then came and collected me to take me back home.

Even with local people who I wouldn't consider to be friends just great neighbors. We stop and chat on the street or in the stores.

There are a few grumpy people, but they are like that with all people. We have many students, children, and adults who come for English lessons.

I have run my own business for the entire time I have been here and have many great clients.

There are many great people here.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

@wallace

I fully agree that there are great people in Japan. I posted that earlier on in the thread.

Japanese people themselves admit they are socially awkward ( they prefer the word ‘shy’ ) and particularly around foreigners. I worked for a large Japanese company and this issue came up frequently. I had a Japanese manager who lived in Hong Kong and Singapore and saw this social unease as a real problem. My coworkers who had lived abroad saw it. People transferred to Japan saw it. I saw it at work and around me outside work.

I have a lot of time for Japan, but this is a weak point. I don’t think I’ve ever come across a Japanese person who’s spent time abroad who has said Japanese people in general are good with people, warm or welcoming.

This isn’t Japan-bashing. I’m a Brit. typically we aren’t great at it either.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

Jimizo

@wallace

I fully agree that there are great people in Japan. I posted that earlier on in the thread.

> Japanese people themselves admit they are socially awkward ( they prefer the word ‘shy’ ) and particularly around foreigners. I worked for a large Japanese company and this issue came up frequently. I had a Japanese manager who lived in Hong Kong and Singapore and saw this social unease as a real problem. My coworkers who had lived abroad saw it. People transferred to Japan saw it. I saw it at work and around me outside work.

That is just a generalization. I don't find that in my own circles of relationships. So it does not apply to an entire nation. I have had a very different experience. I also exchange Line messages with many Japanese friends on a daily basis on all sorts of topics.

I have a lot of time for Japan, but this is a weak point. I don’t think I’ve ever come across a Japanese person who’s spent time abroad who has said Japanese people in general are good with people, warm or welcoming.

My spouse lived in the UK. Some of my closest friends studied in the UK.

This isn’t Japan-bashing. I’m a Brit. typically we aren’t great at it either.

I didn't say it was. You are now living in the UK again, is that correct? Anyway, I think you left the country.

My own experience has been very different from the one you have described.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Jimizo

It was just an observation. I don’t see an appetite for increased immigration to Japan among the public. The polls I’ve seen seem to bear this out. I’d be happy to be corrected here.

How do you explain 30 years ago the foreign community was about 1 million? Now it is nearly 3 million.

I think you can't answer the question because you have already left or am I mistaken about that? Not sure where you are getting your info from.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

@wallace

From a 2018 Pew survey:

While the public tends to view emigration as a problem, most are comfortable with recent immigration trends. When asked whether Japan should accept more, fewer or about the same number of immigrants, only 23% believe the Japanese government should allow more immigrants to move to their country. A majority (58%) voices the opinion that immigration numbers should stay about the same as they are now, while 13% think fewer immigrants should be allowed to move to their country

There is always the problem that the public doesn’t know the exact figures, and that these numbers are a few years old, but they do indicate a sentiment.

As I said, I’ll be happy to be corrected with more up to date figures or discuss alternative interpretations.

I honestly don’t want this to turn confrontational. I have a lot of respect for your posts but I don’t post things like this without something to back it up.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@Jimzo Sorry for the late reply but I'll add a couple of points to the conversation:

1) Japan also has a great deal of variation in terms of social culture. Most Japanese cities are bigger than British cities, and I view the social environment in these places as being similar to London. You get a wide variety of social groups in these cities as well. If you go to rural areas than it becomes much more relaxed. Furthermore you do get a lot of pockets of uptightness in the UK as well outside the South (for example Scotland in many parts is quite uptight, especially the lowlands and the north-east).

2) Japanese people say that they are socially awkward because they are pessimistic like British people. Comparing them with a Singaporean or Korean can lead to false understandings because those people are more likely to be optimisitc. A typical drama in the UK is about being gritty and realistic, whereas Korean dramas or American dramas are about fantasy and glossiness.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

I regard Japan as a base and although my business is growing, there are niggles here which force me to never think of Japan as my home.

Same.

Looking forward, there will be massive tax hikes causing lack of investment and there is a rapidly developing underclass forming which will lead to more crime.

Absolutely.

I don’t see a bright future

That's what keeps me up at night. I worry about the future of my kids.

I left. Most stifling country I've ever lived in - unnecessary, hinderous rules abound wrapped up in endless paperwork. Technologically backwards, especially when it comes to banking. People are polite and kind but in that distant superficial manner that comes across as insincere sometimes. I like Japan as a tourist and holiday destination but not as a candidate for living there long term.

Agree 100%. Excellent post!

-12 ( +7 / -19 )

JimizoMar. 21  10:36 pm JST

I like Japan as a tourist and holiday destination but not as a candidate for living there long term

To be brutally honest, I think deep down most Japanese would like more non-Japanese to think this way although many would hesitate to say it, at least in front of non-Japanese.

Absolutely 100% true.

wallaceMar. 21  11:03 pm JST

I have been here 30 years and live in a place where there are no other foreigners. I have so many great relationships. I go to their homes for dinner parties and they come to ours. We make many activities together. I have visitors every week. Some for a chat others to bring me something like vegetables.*

Japanese are great at putting their best faces forward. I learned this after 3 months here.

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

@Jimzo

Yawn. This is getting boring.

Again, cut and paste it if you can’t spell it. The walls should close in on that mistake.

Thanks in advance.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I like Japan as a tourist and holiday destination but not as a candidate for living there long term

To be brutally honest, I think deep down most Japanese would like more non-Japanese to think this way although many would hesitate to say it, at least in front of non-Japanese.

Absolutely 100% true.

I'll second that.

People are polite and kind but in that distant superficial manner that comes across as insincere sometimes

I don't know if I would call people here in general polite nor kind. In the decades I've lived here, things have changed ALOT. Just my personal observation. Although, I am taken aback at how welcoming Japanese people can genuinely be in the Inaka. Kanto people, in my own personal experience, have been some of the coldest people I've ever met.

I have heard Japanese people say the kind of immediate openness and friendliness you find in more welcoming cultures is insincere.

A sad way to look at human interaction.

Agree

-6 ( +7 / -13 )

There's no problem living out your days here.

The only thing that I think people should worry about is being in a retirement home.

Those old guys are going to be sitting around playing Shogi and talking about former Yokozuna's.

I can't imagine it being fun or relaxing. Don't expect any cheeseburgers.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

No. I think a lot of people like living in Japan long term but to live here forever is a big step. There's a lot more to like about my home country over Japan as far as retirement is concerned. In Japan retiring in the countryside is very affordable. In the cities it's very expensive and the other issue is the rising costs due the growing elderly population. The pension system in place is a big worry too.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Same as Sangetsu03. Came with a packback 23 years ago.

Could luckily find a teaching job the next month, and now work in my field, making a could living, having many opportunities.

I was thinking to go back in the past, but now I am thinking to end my career here. As for retirement, I hope to go back to my country or jungle between both countries

Getting older, I need to construct more relationships with local people, which is not easy

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I already stayed here for 10 years, and thinking getting out of here soon. I guess, Japan is one of the boring country in the world.

-2 ( +9 / -11 )

If people intend to leave Japan, sooner than later is better, and put a time limit on it.

We married in London and lived there for some years before moving to Japan, mostly for the sake of my spouse.

Since we have left all sorts of new restrictions have been put in place requiring her to have a spouse visa. We probably can no longer meet that requirement so her visa would be denied. We simply cannot return like so many others.

There is a small possible loophole in using my Irish citizenship to enter the UK via Ireland which would require living in Ireland for six months.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

I've lived most of my adult life here now - came here at 19 and never looked back. With that said, the want to leave has, in recent years, crept into the back of my mind. I left my original hometown (which I sorely miss) because of a lack of opportunities. I think that is the very same reason why a part of me thinks, even after living here for a decade and a half, that it might be time to move on from Japan, too. There's a severe lack of opportunities, and not just in the career sphere. It markedly impacts one's quality of life.

As for retirement, assuming I ever have enough saved to do so (unlikely), I've had a dream retirement spot in mind since I was a teenager, and unfortunately it is not here in Japan.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

God forbid.

I have been frustrated enough.

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

I likely will, but also spending maybe 1/3 of my time in my other "home" country every year. My real home country has been destroyed by thugs. All things considered, Japan is a very good country, and people have been nice to me, helped a lot. Difficult to make friends, but if you do make one, it is likely to be a true friend. Yes, bureaucratic rules are often maddening, but i don't have to deal with them a lot. I am very grateful to be able to live and retire here long-term, even though I have only worked 11 years.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

There should be a click on yes no, who will count this. If this is a survey, it should be only one Yes/ no question if there can only be one answer.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

There is no one answer to this.

It pretty much Depends upon many factors....

Death through overwork would pretty much settle that one, though, and we do often tend to work long hours here, even in our "Senior" years.

And nowadays we have the Global Government Pension "Ponzi" Scheme rearing its ugly head, forcing Governments around the World to extend the age of retirement beyond the average Life expectancy of most.

So, retirement in Japan... is debatable. Should I survive long enough to claim my State Pension here, I'd consider relocating to somewhere, where the money will go further, and the quality of life would be better... which may still be somewhere in Japan - I really don't know right now. Heck, if the Wife dies, then I may look for a younger version and reboot my sex life again and swing into Kid production... and be forced once again to work for a living..

Times are changing rapidly - who really know what the future will be ? Just be flexible, and adapt.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

@sangetsu Home is where you were born, where you are is where you landed as a guest whether you like it or not. Even if you speak the native language or practice the customs you are still an outsider with certain privileges that are always judged based on whom you are interacting with for acceptance. You can say "what you came to Japan with and what you gained while there". With that you can "bash the pleasant city you left in America that you said is now overrun with homeless, where crime has forced half the local businesses to move or close, 911 calls go unanswered, the public schools are public dumpster fires which are seeing so many kids pulled out by their parents that teachers are being laid off". That's but those same people with can live with out of fear from an erroneous missile that the little fat guy launches when he has one of his fits, they may not have all those things you boast about, and the grass isn't always greener on the other side who is to say you might not have to go back to where you came from, if you are as successful as you CLAIM you are you don't have to go back to those problems. That is your choice because you would have the means to better yourself. If you could have done those same things you did in the states that you are doing in Japan there wouldn't have been a reason for leaving. Perhaps an easy way out and to boast about where you are now and where you came from. Its ok to enjoy the life you life but don't trash where you come from because one day you might have to go back for your own safety and family security! Enjoy for now!

I’ve done well in Japan, I came here with two suitcases 17 years ago, and moved into a 13 square meter apartment in Chiba. Today I have a business, a family and a dog, a large home with a view of Tokyo Tower, and two vacation homes. Will I return to America? The pleasant city I left in America is now overrun with homeless, crime has forced half the local businesses to move or close, 911 calls go unanswered, the public schools are public dumpster fires which are seeing so many kids pulled out by their parents that teachers are being laid off. I think I’ll stay if Japan will continue to have me

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Tough One, can NEVER decide !!!!!!!!!!!!?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

No... it's a very sad country for old people.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

No. It comes down to which country is best for you in your retirement years. If you are set on retiring in Japan make sure you have a retirement plan. There’s a lot of people just floating around in life with no savings and investments going on and Japan is not the place to be if you’re just scraping by when your old and gray!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

As a long-term resident here, I can say that I would not want to live here forever, but would like the freedom to come back anytime I wanted.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Been here for over 30 years... made the decision to stay a long time ago and have not had second thoughts.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I'm going to try to, but being divorced, and never having had "Permanent Residency", I think the money makers at the Immigration office will have something to say about it...I have no family of my own anywhere else.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The UK has become a conformist society where freedom of speech is under serious threat. The educated middle class were all hysterically left-wing, pro-lockdown and anti-Brexit and conservatives like me are often cancelled or at least regarded as dangerous/stupid/malicious, or all three.

So I will return and with a certain amount of trepidation after several decades, but it's my country and it's where I will die.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I look at the oldsters in Japan and they don’t look happy at all.

Is that going to be me in a few more decades?

I quake at the thought

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

I will add another point that I used to live in Singapore and have Singaporean friends. In these cities it is harder to make good friends because they are small cities where everyone lives within a short public transport ride away from their school friends for life. People rarely move to a far away location so they never bother to socialise and make new friends. Usually foreigners in the city states of Hong Kong and Singapore tend to make friends with other foreigners. Japan is easer in this regard.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

First part ‘Yes’ and second part ‘No’

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Yes!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Kniknaknokkaer, I don't regard the Conservative Party as conservative in any way. People only vote for them these days for fear of something even worse: the Labour Party. The Conservative Party was opposed to Brexit and gave us 'gay marriage', while importing vast numbers of immigrants. It doesn't stand for any conservative principle whatsoever.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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