Voices
in
Japan

have your say

Are you proud of your nationality, whatever it is?

73 Comments

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

73 Comments
Login to comment

Not proud, not ashamed. I happened to have been born in England to an English father and an Irish mother.

I had no choice in the matter. I don't see how I should be proud of that.

15 ( +18 / -3 )

I'm proud of my nationality but not always proud of what my government does. At those times, I am embarrassed or even ashamed to be my nationality.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Absolutely! But I agree with Brainiac - not at all proud with my government...

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I agree with Jimizo - it's an accident of birth, nothing to be particularly proud of. I did nothing to 'earn' it except be born. I appreciate though that it gets me a lot of advantages people born to other nationalities might not have, and for that I'm very grateful. I suppose that gratefulness might sometimes be seen as pride in the eyes of others.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

As Jimizo and cleo have both already said, neither proud nor ashamed of my nationality. It just is what it is, really, and I'd much prefer to take pride in my own achievements.

Not, er, sure what those are just yet, but I'm hoping there's something!

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Not a bit. Nationality is just the fact of which arbitrarily-defined plot of land of my mother happened to be in when she plopped me out. It doesn't say anything about who I am, my experiences and decisions define that. I might look back to the inspirational heroes and moments in my country's history for inspiration as to what choices I should make, but I don't get to claim some kind of ownership of that history just because I come from a plot of land fairly close by.

I always feel sorry for people who have the need to feel "proud" of their country. It always makes me think they don't value the achievements and social relationships they've built in life, so they have to find some other way to define themselves as good people.

12 ( +14 / -2 )

(random tiny event hidden amongst all the events in the universe)

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I love my home country and culture, it's people. I'm not necessarily proud (or ashamed) of it but I am glad to be a part of it.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I think I'm more grateful (rather than proud) to have been born & raised in southern California in a middle class environment. Been to dozens of other countries and wasn't too impressed with their overall quality of life and their everyday freedoms.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

You should be proud of what you do, not of what you are (in this case, nationality).

While obviously you can be thankful/grateful.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I am proud of both my nationalities... though to say the truth there are also a lot of shameful stuff my fellow countrymen does that I cannot be proud (on both sides).

For those who say that they don't feel pride regarding their nationality, I think you are confusing the meaning of pride and also the meaning of country.

I am not here to teach you the meaning, all here (I assume) are grown people that are able to research and reconsider... but, pride is because of the heritage, because of the beauty that country has (physically as well as emotionally), pride to what the country means to you, like your family and your friends.

The occidental (European??) way of understanding "pride", I think, is reverted to religion.. that puts it as a sin.. which is for me at leas, wrong.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

I'm very proud to be an American. Born in the States. My father American and my mother European half of my life raised in Europe and the other half in States, sunny beautiful California, wouldn't change what I am in the world for nothing, but as far as my race is concerned I'm Very proud of what I am as everyone should be. Lucky to be in the profession that I'm in. I feel extremely fortunate about what have accomplished in my life and where I've been.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

Yes and no. Proud, but not nationalist. I don't take credit or swell up with pride and brag to my friends or feel good about myself if my countrymen and women do something that I had absolutely no part in; nor do I feel ashamed about scandals or bad behaviour that I had no part in.

More than pride or anything of the sort, though, I feel blessed and thankful, to have been born where I was and to have been able to choose where I am. Most people in the world don't have such luck, and for those people we should do our best to allow them to choose a better life if they so desire and are willing to try and make it better for them and others. THAT, I believe, would be something to be proud of.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Daniel, the meaning of 'pride' in the context of this question is the same all over the world. No-one here is talking about sins or any other religious interpretation of 'pride'. Very simply, pride is (was) usually used in reference to something that you've had some meaningful level of involvement in. e.g. A parent being 'proud' of their child.

However, the modern usage of the term allows people to be 'proud' of anything, regardless of their personal involvement. Being proud of your nationality is a common example of this usage, but you also hear of people being 'proud' of athletes, sports stars (when they win), award-winning actors, etc., even though they have no personal connection with them. I, and others in this comment thread, prefer the 'personal achievement' interpretation, meaning nationality cannot be a source of pride (unless you found your own country).

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I am very proud to be a human being. I am a human nationalist who thinks the rights of all humans should be respected.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Nationality (of which I have 3) or heritage/provenance/racial origin (or whatever else you might call where your ancestors hailed from etc) are 2 different things. not sure I am proud of either, but certainly aware of my roots and socialization.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yes and no.

It gets me angry when I hear about the horrible stories of our soldiers and what they did and are doing in other countries. Throw in the drones and the government in there as well.

Then I watched a movie "Machine Gun Preacher" recently and am very proud of my fellow Americans and all their generosity. And this goes for all people and all nations who try to make this world a better place.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I was born in Italy, to an Italian father and a Japanese mother, but barely lived there.. And I was raised all over the place.. so I feel like I don`t even have a nationality..lol

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I think I was extremely lucky to have been born where I was, but I can't take any pride in what was a stroke of luck. If I'd passed a test to allow me to be what I am, I'd feel proud. But I didn't, so I'm happy with my luck.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Just don't expect your national governments to do anything for ya just because of your nationalities, e.g. if ya join ISIS, then don't expect to be treated as your old nationals.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

No. Nationality is an artificial shackle used to divide us. Sometimes in a philosophical way, sometimes in a very annoying way at airports where you have to go in one line and your spouse/kids have to go in another. And sometimes, depending on which passport you choose to use, it dictates how long you get to stay in a country.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Why the hell not?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

@katsu78

Total "dehumanization of your enemy" on your part buddy, and simply for the convenience it brings in "tickling your sense of moral superiority". Low stuff.

Ghandi, Mandela, Lincoln, Rizal, etc were all proud nationalist, and I'm sure they were just as proud of their own achievements.

Its obvious that you think lowly of nationalists, and you express that by giving them pity (further establishing your "being the bigger person"), lol. haters gon hate

Go Canada

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

Franco-Scandinavian born in England with Eurasian kids I wouldn't know which one to be proud of...!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Prouder of my Catholic faith most of all and then my nationality and ancestral nations in that order.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

I am grateful for my nationality, not proud of it.

I pride myself in my Jewish ethics, and that is good to be proud of.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

F4HA604OCT. 27, 2015 - 03:38PM JST Total "dehumanization of your enemy" on your part buddy,

Pretty sure I didn't say people who are proud of their country are my enemies, just that I get a certain impression of them because of the fact that they're proud of a description that they (usually) didn't earn and which literally conveys almost no information about them. I hope this opinion hasn't threatened you somehow.

It's sort of like a sports team. I don't see anything wrong with people cheering for a sports team and enjoying them play. But when a fan who has never actually played on the team or met them in person or had anything to do with their success claims to feel "proud" of the team, or when someone says that the team they cheer for defines who they are, that's sort of odd and a little bit pitiful, isn't it?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Proud to be Scots AND British... but not proud of what successive governments have done to the country (UK as a whole).

Do I drape myself in a flag and sing the anthem? No. You can have pride in your country and your nationality without descending into jingoism or going the bovver boot route and becoming an ultra right wing nationalist nutjob with tattoos and a Staffy.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

'I think I was extremely lucky to have been born where I was, but I can't take any pride in what was a stroke of luck. If I'd passed a test to allow me to be what I am, I'd feel proud. But I didn't, so I'm happy with my luck.'

I fully agree. I'd add many born and bred 'proud' citizens of a country would fail a citizenship test given to newcomers.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I'd like to see a world where nationality is not even part of our life anymore, just causing division and judgements. We are all one with all our differences of course, but that's the beauty of diversity. I am born German and I like and dislike aspects of this culture, that's it.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Born and live in the UK....there are easily worse places to be born...Have a Japanese wife...haven't met a Japanese person yet who is not proud of their country.............

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I fully agree. I'd add many born and bred 'proud' citizens of a country would fail a citizenship test given to newcomers.

Want to bet on that? We're not all ignorant yokels you know.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

'I fully agree. I'd add many born and bred 'proud' citizens of a country would fail a citizenship test given to newcomers.'

'Want to bet on that? We're not all ignorant yokels you know.'

I didn't say you were. Do I want to bet on many proud citizens of a country failing a citizenship test? Oh, yes. I'll put my house on it. Readers of The Sun?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I agree with Jimizo - it's an accident of birth, nothing to be particularly proud of. I did nothing to 'earn' it except be born.

Garbage -- and dishonors the generations of your family that built whatever country you happen to be from. In my case, my father's family immigrated from Ireland, while my mom's came from French-Canada, and they did so to find a better life for their future generations. And they worked hard and invested in that country. So, yes, I am very proud of my "nationality", which as others have pointed out, is different than being proud of everything that nation does. But I am more proud of the two aging people who fly the U.S. flag everday, because of what that represents.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Happy to be American and I am not going to blame the American nationality by the acts of a few individuals. Same goes for not calling out all Japanese because of some fools.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Like most of the others, I am neither proud nor ashamed. It is what it is, and I am me because of my country. I can feel grateful when learning about the hardships of other countries, and also sad because I got this 'gift' by pure chance of who I was born to. I will say, for my character, it would have been a lot harder to be me living in a more disciplined country, such as Japan, as a youth, But as an adult, it suits me just fine. go figure

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Are you proud of your nationality, whatever it is?

Pride before a fall? How long will the sovereign nation state survive?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Nope -- completely ashamed of it. Society does not need nations anymore. They have become obsolete. "Earthling" is the only classification I need.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Like so many of you have commented, accident of birth. Take it for what it gives you the opportunity to become, what it gives you the opportunity to give, what it gives you the opportunity to share. Besides, pride is egomaniacal, and not worthy of attention from those of us who prefer to think on a higher level.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

You get nationality by chance of birth. It can have nothing to do with your pride. Your pride is from what you have achieved.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

pride is egomaniacal, and not worthy of attention from those of us who prefer to think on a higher level.

Perhaps, but sometimes I don't think we can help it. The rational part of me tells me it is an accident of birth. But that doesn't stop me feeling embarrassed when a fellow countryman does something stupid such as start a hotel fire in Tokyo, or feel something that might be described as pride when another does something good such as save a child. I'm not sure if that is a form of nationalism or not, but I think we feel an association of sorts with those who share our language and background.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sure I am.

But I got to tell you: all those "Proud to be an American" or "Another proud Italian" bumper stickers are just sad.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I am Australian with Scottish ancestry and a half Japanese son. They are very good countries but to be honest I dont feel like I belong anywhere. Germany is the country I felt most comfortable in, maybe Holland too but I guess everyone want to live there and there is no room left for me. I cant complain though.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

As an observation - it seems more Americans are proud of having their nationality than non-Americans. Is this pride misplaced? No idea...

Im of almost identical heritage as Jimizo. Im thankful because of the opportunities it has given me (especially regarding traveling and living in other countries) but am most proud of what I have achieved in my adult life, especially my kids. Ive been away from my home countries for over 10 years. I now identify closer with NZ, where I live, which seems a fresher and a more responsible society. I volunteer in the NZ Fire service and believe I have contributed enough to my adopted home to warrant citizenship in a couple of years when Im finally eligible. Then I will be proud of my nationality as I will be able to describe the blood and tears Ive put into it.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

After so many years as an expat, it's a legal thing that I don't think about often. Truthfully, I identify more with ,y home state than I do with my country.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm proud of my nationality. My country, though small, has made efforts to do good things on the world stage. I was raised with this mindset, and the people in my country live with this mindset - to do the right thing to people, and just as importantly, to not do the wrong thing (for example we didn't participate in the Iraq invasion). That's something I'm proud of.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

As an observation - it seems more Americans are proud of having their nationality than non-Americans. Is this pride misplaced? No idea...

Yeah, it is. People are naturally proud of where they are from. Its human nature.

I DO find many previous posters who seem to have nothing but contempt to be born in a western country with human rights, labour rights, healthcare, the highest standard of living in history, etc. to be extremely annoying and hypocritical. I'd like to see them live a week in Somalia, Afghanistan, North Korea, Haiti or any number of similar countries and have the same ungrateful attitude.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

'I DO find many previous posters who seem to have nothing but contempt to be born in a western country with human rights, labour rights, healthcare, the highest standard of living in history, etc'

I haven't read a single post displaying contempt or ingratitude towards their nationality. I've read some making perfectly reasonable statements that it's difficult to feel proud of something they didn't earn. Where is the contempt or the ingratitude?

The question was about pride, not gratitude.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Jimizo - You go to great pains to avoid a basic question; "Are you proud of your nation"?

I'm going to guess you are not.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Jimizo - You go to great pains to avoid a basic question; "Are you proud of your nation"?

That's not the question that has been asked though.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

it is if you aren't totally anal

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Not really, a nationality is something that is applied to a person. It's not really something to be proud of or not. A nation is a collection of people and laws etc, and does things that one can be proud of or not.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

speak of the devil....

Stranger, little hint....just between you and me....to be proud of your nationality implies you are proud of your.....nation.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

to be proud of your nationality implies you are proud of your.....nation.

I'm proud of my nation, but I can't really say I'm proud of my nationality. It's something I was born into, I didn't achieve it, and it didn't achieve me.

So you know, they are the same other than that they are different.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I have to agree, the question would have been more relevant if they had said 'nation' instead of 'nationality'.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

'Jimizo - You go to great pains to avoid a basic question; "Are you proud of your nation"?'

I think my first post which said 'Not proud, not ashamed' dealt with the question about being proud of your nationality pretty clearly. I don't think Strangerland is being pedantic by pointing out the difference between being proud of your nation or proud of your nationality here.

I'll also answer your question about being proud of your nation if you like. It's the same answer - not proud, not ashamed.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@Clamenza Getting back on point, can you point out the ingratitude or contempt shown by myself or other posters? I honestly can't see it.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Jimizo - I do. What is wrong in saying your country is a pretty great place that has done some pretty great things and stands for some pretty great ideals? No need to overthink it and assume you personally had to free the slaves to feel any pride.

I feel a lot of pride in the fact that my forefathers fought for a lot of the freedoms and lifestyle I was raised in. I'm not saying its perfect, but my country stands for something that so many people in those aforementioned countries can only dream about

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Well, it's pretty clear from this statement:

I DO find many previous posters who seem to have nothing but contempt to be born in a western country with human rights, labour rights, healthcare, the highest standard of living in history, etc. to be extremely annoying and hypocritical.

That either you don't know what contempt means, or that you were just plainly wrong with the statement altogether.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@Clamenza You said I was avoiding the question of my feelings here when it was actually the first thing I posted. You are taking this to an extreme here by not pointing out the contempt and ingratitude. Where is it? By saying 'I'm not proud' does not imply contempt. Are you honestly saying it does?

'What is wrong in saying your country is a pretty great place that has done some pretty great things and stands for some pretty great ideals? No need to overthink it and assume you personally had to free the slaves to feel any pride.'

It isn't how I feel for a kick-off. I get the sense you are American ( please forgive me if I'm wrong here ). I lived in the States and have a lot of time for the place and I don't want to be offensive but I found the flag-waving, pledge-reciting, foam number one finger-waving a bit sinister in all honesty. You seem to be advocating patriotism here and I dislike it intensely and find it dangerous. The US media coverage of the Iraq War played on these sentiments and the sight was utterly repulsive. Not all followed like sheep, but that dangerous current was easy to use.

My country of birth has made great contributions to humanity and has also been guilty of appalling offences to humanity. I take no credit nor blame. I mentioned my mother was Irish and she doesn't blame the UK for allowing signs like 'no dogs, no Irish' on accommodation which greeted her family when they arrived. She blamed particular people. She was also grateful for the people who treated her decently.

I also have the perspective to know I could have been born in worse places and think the UK is a decent place to live. I repeat, my lack of pride does not imply contempt.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

There were a few posts that stated there is no need for nations anymore. These claims are remarkably naive. I do not want to suggest that there will always be a need for nations, but our social structures have not developed to a point where nations have become irrelevant.

So if every government in the world today collapsed but one which then was given authority over the whole of the earth it would not govern well. Massive areas (I would say full continents) would fall into anarchy as the one government is trying to establish its ability to enforce law and order as well as provide aid. All humans are equal however, we are dramatically different. To think that one form of government could successfully govern us today shows a lack of understanding of the diversity of human culture and thought. It could happen one day, but I am sure it would be decades or probably more likely a few centuries away.

Like most of the other respondents I do not look at my nation in terms of pride or shame.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Couldn't care less about my nationality. Totally ashamed of having one. I mean in 21st century, we still discriminate people on things like that.

posters who seem to have nothing but contempt to be born in a western country

I know my luck. Even the luck of being born is a higher middle class steady family (and not in a squat of druggies a,d weirdos inside the same country).

no need for nations anymore. These claims are remarkably naive.

No, it's seeing further. Nations as we define them now are a concept of 19th century, even late 19th century. That seemed a good idea back then. They tried something... and that didn't work. And it should already have been abolished because it is one of the causes of the biggest wars since the beginning of humanity. EU is the best thing that has occurred in my life-time . I grew up in the '3 border area' which also known for being a past battle-field and that bloody past was when my parents were kids. The union has forced the nations to lose strength and that brought peace and exchanges.

So if every government

You don't need nations to 'govern' and organize society. Probably a combination of urban communities (that could deal with local lifestyles) inside continent sized structures (to manage big infrastructures like highways, airports and environment preservation) would be more efficient.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Jimizo, this Canuck-born adopted Japanophile wholeheartedly agrees. Keep thinking straight, don't get tied up with semantics.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@Jimizo - Nope not American, although I'm constantly perplexed at why Brits have such a blind hatred of your cousins. Yet in the same breath they tell you why they hate Britain so much. Just don't get it. Being proud of your country does't always have to equate to being a rabid flag-waving crazy. But the terms with which you and a few others here dismiss being so blessed do strike me as short-sighted and ungrateful. But thats one of the side effects of having grown up the most pampered, rich and coddled generation ever. We are also the most entitled.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Sure I would like to feel proud. Proud that my country had eradicated poverty, lived environmentally sustainably, was edifying for humanity as a whole, tried hard to solve world conflicts in a mature manner, was a beacon for the whole world in its kindness and maturity and all-round sophistication and many more. But it hasn't done much of any of these things. It is mostly nasty, thuggish and beholden to a small privileged elite, like every other country. Yes, it has managed to convince its population that it is "good" but they have been fooled. Just like most people with such pride.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

'Nope not American, although I'm constantly perplexed at why Brits have such a blind hatred of your cousins. Yet in the same breath they tell you why they hate Britain so much. Just don't get it.'

I hope you're not including me in that. I said I have a lot of time for the US. I just don't like its patriotism or that of any country. It's possible to like and respect a country but still criticise aspects of it which you find dangerous. One of the aspects of the UK I like is the fact that patriotism has been tamed but I'm very concerned at its recent recrudescence with headcases like UKIP stirring the pot. In recent history, I'd say the Iraq War did a lot to turn UK opinion against the US but any Brit with common sense should have turned their fury on toadying UK politicians led by the foul Tony Blair. It didn't change my opinion of the UK or the US - it changed my opinion of Blair ( a man I voted for twice ).

I don't want to sound condescending but I find the kind of patriotism you seem to be in favour of a bit childish. I find the UK's general attitude with its self-deprecation, cynicism and willingness to criticise its most 'sacred' values very mature and balanced. I'll tell you what's good or bad about my country of birth in equal measures.

My country of birth also has a great tradition of political agitators and thinkers - Tyler, Ball, Pankhurst, Milton, Stuart Mill and Russell to name just a few and I doubt people of that stature would be saying "Sing Rule Britannia' and be thankful for your blessings you spoiled, mollycoddled buggers" if they were around today. I can imagine they'd be hauling the government of this day over the coals. That's a Britsh tradition I respect more than most. I'd hate to see the day when those using food banks in one of the world's richest countries are told to be grateful and proud they are not gnawing at a mouldy potato, drinking filthy water or or sending their kids up chimneys. I can't imagine Bertrand Russell saying the number of people sent to die in Iraq was piddling compared to the outrageous numbers sent into the bloodbaths at Flanders. Thankfully, some of the traditions of the people I mentioned are still alive for many in UK. Great people who contributed much.

Honestly, I don't hate this country. I'd like to see it improve.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Jimizo - Wow, look what happened! When pressed about how you really feel about your country, you actually came across as proud! Even, dare I say, patriotic. (I guess theres a little childishness in all of us) No more or no less than most of the many Americans I've met in my many years here in Japan.

I think a sobering reminder to all of us of how lucky we are is Moonraker's painful exposé of the horrible conditions he grew up in. Im sure not many of us can match the terrible hardships and hardscrabble upbringing he surely endured at the hands of an unelected, tyrannical oligarchy ( Im guessing N. Korea or possibly a former Soviet republic) I can only hope that Moonraker's refugee status here in Japan will be respected and a much better life led. God Bless you sir, for sharing your brave story of survival.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

@Clamenza Not proud nor patriotic. Just pointing out the good and bad. Great contributions ( great people ) and vile offences ( vile people ). As I said, no hatred nor contempt.

It's called balance.

Is it worth asking you where the hatred is or is it hiding with the extremely elusive contempt and ingratitude?

By the way, I didn't thumb your comment down. I'm not childish in that sense.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Jimizo - Sorry, but the amount of scorn aimed at Americans or anything American from Brits on this site is palpable.

As far as contempt or ingratitude at your great fortune. Well, agree to disagree, but its how I see it.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Yes and no, I am aware of where I am from and proud of some of the countries achievements and until fairly recently the manner in which it looked after people, but not so blindly so to think its above criticism and am not particularly fond of the current government.

I know I feel very fortunate to have had the opportunities I have had, and that a family with the lack of resources mine had would have meant a very different outcome had I been in some other countries in a similar situation.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@katsu78

Not a bit. Nationality is just the fact of which arbitrarily-defined plot of land of my mother happened to be in when she plopped me out. It doesn't say anything about who I am, my experiences and decisions define that. I might look back to the inspirational heroes and moments in my country's history for inspiration as to what choices I should make, but I don't get to claim some kind of ownership of that history just because I come from a plot of land fairly close by.

Sorry? There's nothing 'arbitrary' about your place of birth. You're a severely misguided individual if you believe that your place of birth isn't an important part of who you are. You've been through your country's education system, inherited its cultural values, enjoyed it's many layers of sub-culture & I'd be sincerely disappointed if you didn't feel a sense of kinship with your fellow countrymen / women.

I always feel sorry for people who have the need to feel "proud" of their country. It always makes me think they don't value the achievements and social relationships they've built in life, so they have to find some other way to define themselves as good people.

What's wrong with being proud of your country? How is that in any way connected with achievements or social relationships? You could travel the world, work in various fields & make an international network of friends / acquaintances, yet still be proud of 'who you are' & where you come from. As they say, 'home is where the heart is'.

I'm sorry but your argument makes absolutely no sense to me whatsoever.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Yes and no, I am aware of where I am from and proud of some of the countries achievements and until fairly recently the manner in which it looked after people, but not so blindly so to think its above criticism and am not particularly fond of the current government.

NZ2011 - No one asked you if your country was perfect. The question is a straightforward yes or no. Go with your gut feeling, if you like.

My god, is it a generational thing or do people nowadays not have the cojones to make a decision?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

I don't think Pride is the right word to use here.

Specially when the world is shrinking very fast after internet boom.

To me my nationality is just my identity, nothing less, nothing more.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites