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Do you think laughing loudly during a movie at a theater is rude, bearing in mind that in Japan, for example, the subtitles may not be able to convey the meaning of a joke from English into Japanese?

22 Comments

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22 Comments
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Yes. It always is.

-10 ( +4 / -14 )

It would depend I think, on how overbearing and distracting the laugh but not on whether the subtitles are able to convey the nuance of the humor from another language. One should probably understand walking in that something as culturally-based and nuanced as comedy is not likely 100% transferable to those who do not understand it at a native level. Furthermore, understanding a culture at a native-level does not guarantee one will understand all expressions of it either.

I would be interested in hearing why someone shouldn't laugh (defining "loudly" is a bit difficult here) simply because someone else doesn't understand or does not appreciate a joke.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

I'm with J-Dake. If it's funny I'm laughing. And especially b/c we're talking about subtitled films--can you not read your own language while a few people are laughing? If I went to a funny Hong Kong flick in NY and Cantonese speakers were guffawing in the back I wouldn't have a problem with it.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Not at all. In comedies in particular, the directors and actors have worked hard at trying to make us laugh. Purposely suppressing laughter in this case would be disrespectful.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Always laughing loudly? No. inferiority complex.

Busting out laughing once in awhile no problem.

I had to check myself once while on an international flight while watching “Curb Your Enthusiasm”, head phones can be deceiving

3 ( +3 / -0 )

if it's funny you laugh. What is the point of going to see a film if you have to suppress your emotions while watching.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

There were many laugh-aloud scenes in the most recent Avengers movie. I laughed, but nobody else did. Do I need to take cultural sensitivity that far?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Honestly, people show off their loudy laughs on purpose. Much annoying than the sound of the popcorns.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Some things are funny enough to make you laugh out loud.

Laughter can be infectious and there are also types who want to show off how good their English is by pretending to get the joke.

Moderation in all things.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I don't think it is... if I think something is funny I will usually laugh involuntarily. If it's a deliberate action then it's fake laughter. Fake laughter is rude.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

What is the point of going to see a film if you have to suppress your emotions while watching.

Welcome to Japan.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I always laugh in the movie theatre. I paid for a ticket to see a funny movie, couldn't care less if someone takes offensive at my laughter

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Why would you go to a comedy movie if you're offended by laughter? It's like going to the beach when you're offended by sand.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Well as long as you're laughing naturally,what's the big deal? Japanese would just wish they could understand English better.But it's more like the subtitles are there for people to follow what they're watching,more than to understand the nuance behind the laughter.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Heck no! But really, it was impossible not to laugh out loud during virtually all of The Big Lebowski, I nearly had to be taken to the hospital after that, my stomach and sides were hurting so bad.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If you do something naturally (laughing) it isn’t rude. If you feel it is, or others do, then say excuse me. What kinda question is this?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

No. Not for something comic.

I remember the Japanese audience’s response to a scene in “Barry Lyndon” when it premiered in Sapporo in 1979 (?). The redcoats were marching across a field and had just received volley fire from the French with a number of men falling. The audience roared with laughter.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Actually, years ago, lots of Japanese were laughing at a scene in the pretty miserable Irish film, The Magdalene Sisters (the scene when the priest has an itch!). But, to be honest, I think a loud gaijin woman initiated the laugh, and everyone felt relieved they could laugh too.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Not at all a problem here. Do you not hear the high school, uni aged kids purposely laughing way too loud in restaurants, cafes, stations etc? Such an affectation. I'd laugh out loud just to exact revenge in a theater.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Some people have a loud know-it-all obnoxious laugh, which they use to establish their understanding and presence. When they let fly at the first corny joke, it sends cringes all around.

How did they manage to live so long with no-one informing them?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

People are criticizing the idea that laughing at comedy movies is rude - who actually said it is? This article asks if it is, but doesn't make that claim. So whom exactly are people criticizing?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If something is funny, I'm laughing. I'm not paying 1800 yen to sit in earnest silence. I can do that at work.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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