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If you have not yet retired, at what age would you like to retire (if at all)? Do you think you would get bored with retirement?

36 Comments

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36 Comments
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What age= as soon as possible/practical, but as with everything in life, it's a matter of finances.

Would I get bored= no, so many things to do, things to learn and study.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Retire? I hear retire.

The way it looks right now it will be another couple of years (despite my age).

My dream was always around 55 latest by 60.

But that's just another dream.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I doubt I will ever have enough money to enjoy a real retirement. Hopefully by then, the house will be paid off and still in decent shape. Will probably lead a more self-sufficient life up here in the countryside.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I'll retire when I win the lottery. If I could retire tomorrow I would. I'd spend the rest of my days BBQing, spending time with my family, practicing martial arts, drinking, and travelling around Japan and Canada with my family.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Seems like No Business is dreaming the same dream like me.

Pay off the house, enjoy the "inaka life" and get some side gigs.

Now that might work in 5 to 10 years. _

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I plan to retire when I have enough passive income and possibly a small business to keep me afloat. If or when that comes. I have no idea yet. I'm already doing what I plan to do when I retire, I'll just have more time and money to do it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It ain't looking good. Hopefully can just work part time from 65.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

No specific age, but once the house is paid off and the kids are grown up and self-sufficient (fingers crossed), I hope to gradually get more selective about the work I accept until I'm mainly taking on projects that I'm interested in. Ideally I'd be doing a few half days a week that I can fit around gardening, hobbies, and travel. Like several people above, I've already completed stage 1 (move to the country).

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I reckon a comfortable retirement from 65, as I have made some good investments in the financial markets and real estate over many years. I'll be splitting time between a home in Canada and another Southeast Asia. I've got some creative hobbies, the means for travel and lots of friends, which should keep away the boredom.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I work in research, so as long as the system and my health allows, I will not retire.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

If you join the military at age 18 and serve 20 years you can retire at 38.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

If you join the military at age 18 and serve 20 years you can retire at 38.

so you are not in Japan which has no military?

Worked one day in last 25 years so I guess I was sort of retired. As a painter you keep going until the end comes.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

so you are not in Japan which has no military?

Never heard of the SDF?

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Never heard of the SDF?

The SDF are not military. They are special civil servants and you don't get to retire at 38.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

Sorry, zichi, I should have said I was referring to the U.S. military. Not sure about the retirement policy of the SDF, but I can assure you they are military, as I worked with them, and I can also assure you they have plenty of firepower.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Is that why if you join the Japanese military nobody shoots at you?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The SDF are not military. They are special civil servants and you don't get to retire at 38.

They clearly are a military.

Not sure what their retirement policies are, but its not normal for military members in other countries to retire at 38 either, at least if you want to continue to feed yourself (I'm a former member of the Canadian army, while you do get a "pension" after 10 years of service, unless you stay in until quite a bit older than 38 it is not going to be enough to cover any thing).

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Speaking from beyond the pale.

Retired many years ago and despite retractions on all fronts, encouraged enthusiastically by the wife, still unable to live solely on the pension. Compulsory Health and Nursing insurance gouges the pension, and then with the rent on top there is really not much left.

It helps to have money invested elsewhere that can help pay for all the little extras, such as flights back to see the young ones.

Recently I have found a way to bring in extra income that also follows/allows several of my hobbies, (at least that is the general idea). Without a hobby, I might end up glued to the PC or TV, largely unaware of what day it is, and unable to combat declining health.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I was bored at work so retiring ended that. My hobby keeps me busy, creative, and in contact with lots of people. However, the Health insurance is a big bite out of my pension. Big bite. Unfortunately, in the future I might have to use it.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Now 51. House paid off 59. 1st kid finishes 4-yr college 59. 2nd kid 62. 3rd kid 67. So maybe 67.

I'm freelance, so I only have stress from work, not stress from working for other people or working at hours dictated by others. Retirement for freelancers isn't the line it is for people working regular jobs.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I'll be working til I'm dead, not my choice but there it is.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

SDF are not military in the usual way and only need to give a months notice to leave, like any other job. They are not enlisted.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

No chance of retirement for the foreseeable future, but if I could?

Travel all over the world. Re-establish old friendships. Read those many books I haven't got round to.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Been teaching English for 20 years plus....so I guess I’m already retired!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

SDF are not military in the usual way and only need to give a months notice to leave, like any other job. They are not enlisted.

This again doesn't distinguish them as "non military" and its also not true, SDF members are recruited for a fixed term pretty much like they are in most other militaries.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I am a university part time instructor in Tokyo. My three universities have mandatory retirement ages of 70. I am 67 and very, very healthy. What do you think I will say next? That's right. NO mandatory, arbitrary, "expiration date" of retirement! Donald Keene was a perfect example, among many others. University teachers often get better with age, like fine wine. He retired when he died only too recently in his 90s. There are others.

I wish these mandatory expirations were abolished immediately, like before I am forced off the stage. I am have a lot to offer any students. I resent, no, am completely demoralized, by this approaching kick off the state. It is not a matter of money to the universities. I am paid very little more than the freshest "wet behind the ears" recent university graduate who comes to Japan for work and female booty. That is not the point. I love my job, am committed to being a great professor, yet in the end, I am kicked off the payroll. Given the state of the Japanese economy, I would think at the very least my continued working would be encouraged as I pay taxes into the economy!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I really wish there was an "edit" function here. Reposting:

I am a university part-time instructor in Tokyo. My three universities have mandatory retirement ages of 70. I am 67 and very, very healthy. What do you think I will say next? That's right. NO mandatory, arbitrary, "expiration date" of retirement! Donald Keene was a perfect example, among many others. University teachers often get better with age, like fine wine. He retired when he died only too recently in his 90s. There are others. I wish these mandatory expirations were abolished immediately, like before I am forced off the stage. I STILL have a lot to offer any students. I resent, no, am completely demoralized, by this approaching kick off the STAGE. It is not a matter of money to the universities. I am paid very little more than the freshest "wet behind the ears" recent university graduate who comes to Japan for work and female booty. That is not the point. I love my job, am committed to being a great professor, yet in the end, I am kicked off the payroll due to an arbitrary age. Given the state of the Japanese economy, I would think at the very least my continued working would be encouraged as I pay taxes into the economy!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Retirement? Bring it on! Sod work.

First on the list is to get a dog, followed by improving my poor musicianship, reading books I didn’t get round to, swimming, traveling, improving my chess game, improving my mahjong game, teaching maths or science as a volunteer, helping out at charities, improving my cooking, watching lots of football...

Hope the health holds out.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Hope to be done by the time I'm 60 and hopefully enjoy a longish retirement.

I might be dead by 70, so best make the use of a limited lifespan.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I plan to retire when I'm 40.

But I'm 45 now. Damn, so much for that plan...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

When I was young and considering various careers/subject choices, my father took me to see (among others) a Solicitor he knew. I never forgot his advice, that no man should work beyond 50. In reality I aimed for 60, but ended up semi-retiring at 55. Now I have no idea how I found time to fit work in! Bored, you are joking! An active mind and a moderate social life, a few interests and plans for a couple more if I can fit them in.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

If one has chosen a 'career-based' life (see: head), then the curse of 'retirement' and the much reduced energy the 'retired' person will usually have at retirement age will make retirement planned at an age of full energy more of a disappointment than a blessing. But, a life chosen with the great good and relatively rare quality of being chosen for 'true interest' (see: heart) does not have the disappointment because 'retirement' is simply not an issue. One does not 'retire' from what makes their Life worth living. But it can take time and trials to find what fulfills a heart, and, if one is highly risk averse, they early on succumb to 'career' more out of fear than intelligence.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

House is paid off, kids are adults finished university, still working, and it doesn't look like I'll be able to retire for a long time. The amount of money needed for health insurance, pension, taxes, property tax etc. is a huge burden, and it just keeps going up each year.

Luckily I really enjoy what I do and don't look at it as work, and will keep going for as long as I can, just try to limit the crazy busy times.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

As a student, I haven't even started my working life, so I guess it'll depend on how I find it. My grandparents both have fulfilling jobs that they love, with my grandfather still working at the age of 80. I'd like to find something like that, but I also like the thought of a longer, chill retirement to do with what I want :)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I guess I am one of those people who live to work, not work to live. I enjoy my job. Someone (I can't remember who) once said that if you enjoy your job, you'll never work a day in your life.

I've seen some people retire at 60 or 65, then go traveling and take up hobbies, but six months later, they are restless and start working again, either part-time or they start their own business. I've seen others who retire and virtually become full-time babysitters for their grandkids. And sadly I know others who retired with nothing to do and they have already entered the early stages of dementia.

For myself, only a serious illness would probably force me into retirement. I don't know why, but somewhere deep in my subconscious mind, I associate retirement with getting old, sick and then death.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

If you love your job, odds are you won't retire until you physically can't do your job anymore.

A lot of people put too much stock in retiring by a certain age. My Father was a hardworking businessman who rarely ever missed work and put off a lot of his 'living' for when he was to retire. He passed away less than a year before he was scheduled to retire.

My husband is also an incredibly hardworking man, he owns several companies that he loves and I can't imagine him ever really retiring. If your work is your life as much as anything else than retiring doesn't seem like an option, no?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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