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In Japan, when a celebrity gets arrested for illegal drug use (Pierre Taki being the latest), or some other offense, companies stop selling their music, videos, pull movies they are appearing in, cut commercial and public appearances. What do you think of this practice known as 自粛 jishuku, or "self-restraint?"

17 Comments

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17 Comments
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Depends on the offence and who's involved. If it's drug taking, that's really down to the individual. If it's sexual assault - then that's a serious crime.

Meanwhile, politicians and corporate types get an easy ride.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

The treatment of this guy is just over the top. He is a contributing member of society, created some music people love, not hurt anybody and yet he is being treated like a serial killer. It's ridiculous. I sam not in favor of drug use, but this is absurd in a country where so many real criminals go unpunished.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

If the artist is truly talented, he/she will bounce back from anything. ie: Noriyuki Makihara still cranking out hits after 3 drug arrests.

That being said, Japan loses a lot of talented artists from drug or infidelity ostracism.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It is an absolute joke! The man has worked hard and is spoken of highly by all who know him. His choice to use recreational drugs harms nobody at all.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

The man has worked hard and is spoken of highly by all who know him. His choice to use recreational drugs harms nobody at all.

He chose to intoxicate himself with an intoxicant that wasn't on the approved list of intoxicants.

Due to his choice to not adhere to the list of approved intoxicants, it has exposed him as a morally deficient, evil person who should rot in jail until the end of all time. Which, though much much worse for him than the actual intoxicant itself, is deserved due to his act of moral turpitude.

Let this be a warning to all, do NOT go off the list of approved intoxicants.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I kind of agree with it, it's a good message to people that this kind of activity is not tolerated, especially to the younger folks who may look up to them as role models. What kind of lesson does it teach like in other countries where people who get convicted of drug use get a slap on the wrist if that and get no consequences, to the point where it's almost expected that drug usage is rampant in that scene?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

I kind of agree with it, it's a good message to people that this kind of activity is not tolerated, especially to the younger folks who may look up to them as role models.

It sends a message that we're all human and occasionally, we need forms of escapism. As long as he's not harming anyone, it's not the end of the world.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

The treatment of this guy is just over the top. He is a contributing member of society, created some music people love, not hurt anybody

Drugs like cocaine kill people. They destroy people's lives. Anyone who is involved in any way with cocaine -- by purchasing it as a user, selling it as a dealer, whatever -- contributes to that death and destruction.

So in that sense, no, we cannot say he did "not hurt anybody."

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Drugs like cocaine kill people. They destroy people's lives. Anyone who is involved in any way with cocaine -- by purchasing it as a user, selling it as a dealer, whatever -- contributes to that death and destruction.

Only stuff that's been cut with inferior and dangerous products. I'm no fan of cocaine but let's be honest here. If drugs are legalized, you have an end to the pushers and cartels and you have less chance of death and destruction with quality product.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Toasted Heretic Today  02:29 pm JST

I kind of agree with it, it's a good message to people that this kind of activity is not tolerated, especially to the younger folks who may look up to them as role models.

It sends a message that we're all human and occasionally, we need forms of escapism. As long as he's not harming anyone, it's not the end of the world.

This "he wasn't harming anyone" claim is total nonsense.

By his purchase and use of cocaine, he contributed to the death and destruction that the "cocaine business" wreaks on so many young lives.

If you knowingly purchase products from a business that capitalizes on addiction, death, and the shattering of lives, then you are very much a part of the problem.

You may assuage your conscience by claiming you're "not hurting anyone" -- but at least indirectly, that is exactly what you are doing.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

Who is doing the jishuku? Pierre Taki? Surely not. It is a voluntary action and means pulling in your head and lying low for a bit till the flak is over. In this case perhaps the companies are doing Jishuku and he is getting the fallout from them, but to most people this simply looks like they are pulling the plug on him, not much jishuku about it at all! Correct me if I am wrong here.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

This "he wasn't harming anyone" claim is total nonsense.

By his purchase and use of cocaine, he contributed to the death and destruction that the "cocaine business" wreaks on so many young lives.

Which is why I always maintain drugs should be legalized.

If you knowingly purchase products from a business that capitalizes on addiction, death, and the shattering of lives, then you are very much a part of the problem.

You could say the same about alcohol, or religious cults. Both big business and both exploitative. If used incorrectly.

You may assuage your conscience by claiming you're "not hurting anyone" -- but at least indirectly, that is exactly what you are doing.

I'm not doing anything except stating my opinion, much like yourself.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Japan wants to hide the fact that drugs exist. I believe, correct me if I'm wrong, that the media is not allowed to even show images of any "white powder" as they believe it will create stress for addicts and influence people to use cocaine. Most Japanese people believe that drugs are not a problem in Japan, but they are. This is the fault of irresponsible government, stupid laws, and poor education. Its very sad.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It's essentially punishing someone who has not had the benefit of a fair hearing.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Being arrested does not mean that a person is guilty (although Japan does seem to have a hard time with that concept). If found guilty, then the company is, in my opinion right to dis-associate themselves with Celebes who should be role models.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Some celebrities think they can able to do what normal people cannot do.

People think the celebrities are so hardworking when we don't realise we ourselves are equally hardworking as those celebrities.

If a poor hard working farmer suddenly does bad, he has no other choice but to be punished by the law and even society.

But when celebrity does bad, he/she has many choices, if hatred by one media or antifan, other supports. He/she mostly dont need to be worried about much.

And a poor farmer..well nobody cares...maybe family or true friend if there is.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What was worse than how any arrested star has been treated was how that Becky chick was treated after her relationship with a married man came out.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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