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Many global charities reported a drop in private, corporate and governmental donations in 2010 due to the ongoing recession and "donor fatigue" over the numerous requests for help in the aftermath of

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It's not just donor fatigue. Many people have suffered pay cuts. My salary was cut by 15% last April, so I had to cut back on my charitable giving.

Another factor, I think, is that nowadays I can't be sure of where the money is going, and which charities are reliable and which ones aren't. It seems like every time I go to Roppongi, I get accosted on the corner by a group collecting money for earthquake relief in Niigata...and I can't even remember when that earthquake was.

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Donor fatigue has alot to do with it along with the biting recession. I also think more and more people are realising that alot of these so called charities are not so good, as very little if any of the money donated actually makes it to the people who need it.

Most of the funds get swallowed up in administration and other creative ways long before there is any chance of the needy getting it.

Some of the so called charities are very well organised scams and that is a fact!!!

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On top of what smartacus and EE said, some of the top executives of these so call non-profit charities have huge salaries into six or seven figures U.S. dollars. It's a real disgrace. I am not contributing to their big salaries.

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Agree with above posters, seen many charities that offer a prize draw for a 4day/3night trip to Guam for people that donate during a certain period, etc.

Highly doubt that donations will offset the cost of the trip, draw, etc for the charity.

Too many charities work for their own coffers and too little gets actually given to the needy.

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I have witnessed what happened to that donated money in Nicaragua, I guess more people have too.

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Go to the rusky maf. They can help, I think.

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Randoseru anonymous donations is getting more interesting. May be this can serve as a precedent to future donations. People what they can and when they can and give what they want. No propaganda and no organisation needed. Each one decides what should be given.

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JT there was yet another randoseru donation today?

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I follow the Lord Jesus's advice that the poor will always be with us. I should know - I am poor myself.

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KansaiTruth you what???

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I have witnessed what happened to that donated money in Nicaragua, I guess more people have too.

Well Foxie relate, was it good or bad?

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More transparency as to the fate of the money donated to those organisations would help. But when you see the president of the US Red Cross earning US$600,000 each year, you do wonder where the money goes. Japanese charities in particular seem to have very high overheads, and very little ending up at the 'front line.'

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Agree on transparency for NPO's.

Had a friend working at one decent salary, bonuses, latest PC, etc. He said that the way they ran stuff there was always money left over and at the end of the financial year they had to use the money as they couldn't show a profit on the books(so new PC"s, etc were bought).

He left them as he got fed up with how little money went to the needy.

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I think a lot of people are tired of sending money to places, that eventually winds up in the hands of corrupt government officials. Also, in some cases, people in places like the US are weary of sending money to a place after a natural disaster, and once things get back to normal, those same countries that have gotten relief start their usual "Death to the USA."

People are more willing to give locally, or to help out on a local level that may not get reported to large NGO relief organizations.

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jkanda, there have been about 7 cases of "tiger mask" donations so far. Hopefully more people will follow suit.

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It is true that there is corruption, and that for every $1 you donate probably half of it ends up being used for "administrative fees", but until someone comes up with a better system, which is the more favorable?

Cheerily give to charity hoping that at least some, if not most of it will be used for a good cause, or sit back drinking cafe lattes at Starbucks while complaining that you want to help the poor, but there is no charity you can trust to give your money to?

Donor fatigue is understandable, and no one will condemn you for cutting back on what you can give due to economical constraints, but giving nothing to start with and then complain about effectiveness of charities is just wrong. Go to World Vision or something and sponsor a child. It takes 5 minutes. Then go and visit your child in a year, see how your contributions are helping; after that I'd love to hear your thoughts and whether it is a waste of time/money.

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I get confused about why it can be a tax exemption. I would think charities would do better if this was not the case. Someone, who says to themself, Im so busy pulling in the bucks, and have some that I could use. I mean how many homes can one person buy, right! Is there is somebody who can help me get it to X. Ill cover your costs as well. The X is important because it is all such a personal opinion on what or who needs charity. Need being operative. The receiver also needs to be able to get back to living their own life after the charities need has been covered. And this is where I think people become aware of how that can, but not always stem to business. Sometimes that's good and sometimes it isnt-so better keep it personal and not associated with tax. Well that's what I reckon, and is there a donor fatigue? Where??

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