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Remakes are a staple in Hollywood. Which of your all-time favorite movies would you absolutely not like to see remade?

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I'll add Casablanca, mostly because of the cast, including those members who were actual refugees and immigrants fleeing Nazi horrors. Many of them participated in the scene where 'La Marseillaise' was sung showing their contempt for the Nazis, to me one of the most stirring scenes in any movie.

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Big Lebowski - The movie is apparently entirely scripted with no ad-libs, but the delivery is perfect.

2001 - Let's face it, any remake will dumb it down.

Any great mafia movie/Spaghetti Western - too iconic, so any rehash will just be actors doing impressions of di Nero etc.

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As longs as it's done well, or at least has a different take on the source material, I don't mind.

Pirates of the Caribbean, Star Wars and Lord of the Rings. They're already masterpieces as they are

I guess it's subjective, really & a matter of personal taste. I love all the above (well, maybe not all the Pirates franchise, but certainly the first in the series) but all of them are remakes, or from books or borrowed from other films.

PoC is a remake of a theme park ride. And I'll admit, I was snooty about it until I was dragged along to see it. Turned out to be great fun.

The original Star Wars has so many influences; Flash Gordon, Frank Herbert's Dune, Valerian et Laureline and of course, Kurosawa's Hidden Fortress.

LotR originally was released in cinemas in the late 70s. Unfortunately, Ralph Bashki's animated attempt wasn't as thrilling as Peter Jackson's later efforts.

And of course, we now have a series coming to one of the streaming services. I don't know too much about it, but I think it will be drawing from The Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales.

Books are usually the best but maybe the above two require patience and concentration, so am happy to sit through the series. Don't know what Tolkien would have made of it all, but I'm sure he'd acknowledge that his books were inspired by Beowulf and all those Icelandic sagas...

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I've got no problem at all with remakes. The bad ones, of which there are a multitude, can be ignored. And for some people, they serve as a gateway to the original that they wouldn't otherwise have seen.

The same goes for rehashing storylines. A Fistful of Dollars was such a mongrelized concept that it created its own genre, with the fittingly mongrel label "spaghetti western". It borrowed heavily from Yojimbo, a samurai movie by a Japanese director who idolized John Ford, and which has strong parallels with the Dashiell Hammett novel Red Harvest (though Kurosawa himself said he drew from another Hammett novel, The Glass Key).

So, keep up here, A Fistful of Dollars is an Italian-made Western shot in, where else, Spain, with an American TV star in the lead role, a smattering of Italians and Germans thrown in, based on a samurai movie by a Hollywood influenced Japanese director who pulled large amounts of the plot from an American author of pulp detective fiction.

Spaghetti westerns were trash raised to the level of art, and a masterclass in borrowing, copying, and stealing.

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Lawrence of Arabia.

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Spaghetti westerns were trash raised to the level of art, and a masterclass in borrowing, copying, and stealing.

Aye. And when they were scored by Morricone, they became immortal. His collaboration with Leone for Once Upon a Time in the West is probably the greatest example of all. Henry Fonda as the villain was inspired casting and arguably, one of his finest roles.

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To answer the question, all. Remakes are just lazy film making from those without an original Idea. I would rather see original work of decent if mediocre quality than rehashes of others originality.

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Agree with englisc aspyrgend. Remakes are Hollywood's way of making a quick buck. I've already seen the original; I don't need to see it another version of the movie. Instead, make something else that's new.

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A Clockwork Orange, Chinatown, Singing in the Rain, On the Waterfront

Because I think the casts for each were perfect

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Top Gun.

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Any Stanley Kubrick film.

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I'm going the other way. There are a few sci-fi movies I would like to see remade with modern technologies. The first ones would be, the China Syndrome and Soylent Green.

I quite like a lot of the remakes. The Time Machine, The Day the Earth Stood Still, War of the Worlds area few good remakes. There are also quite a few crappy remakes. One that stands out is, Total Recall. The remake is terrible.

As for not wanting them remade. The reasons are subjective. Do you not want them remade because they are terrible or because they are classics? How about Mel Brooks' Space Balls or Elizabeth Taylor's Cleopatra. I would not like to see either of these movies remade because the former is garbage and the latter is a classic.

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It won't be the first one that comes to mind, but my vote goes to "Airplane!" as the greatest remake of all time. It lifts huge chunks of "Zero Hour", which goes from simply corny to hilarious if you watch it knowing the same scenes and the same lines from "Airplane!". "You ever been in a cockpit before, Joey?" "I chose the wrong week to quit smoking" etc., it's all in there!

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Any great mafia movie/Spaghetti Western - too iconic, so any rehash will just be actors doing impressions of di Nero etc.

Do you mean De Niro in the mob movies and Franco Nero in the the Westerns?

Thing is, mob movies and spaghetti Westerns have been remade and themselves borrowed off, so many times.

A Fistful of Dollars being an obvious one, having basically remade Kurosawa's Yojimbo. Nero's Django was the template for Tarantino's recent re-imagining.

The Korean Western (Eastern?) from around ten years back, The Good, the bad, the Weird is another that springs to mind. No need to say which film inspired this comedic take on the genre!

And there's been two classic versions of Scarface, one from Howard Hawks and one from Brian De Palma.

Anyway, as has been pointed out, it's all subjective and depends on just what later generations of movie goers and cinema fans can tolerate. I personally don't believe that remakes destroy the legacy of the originals. Some of them build on it or present a radically different take on the source material. Or are more faithful to the source material.

The Big Lebowski, itself is an hommage to yesteryear's screwball comedies, musicals and film noir - the latter most obvious influence being Chandler (Raymond, not Bing). And it's a wonderful hommage at that.

The Coen Brothers aren't adverse to remakes - True Grit being one of their finest and closer to the novel than the John Wayne version. Both of which I love.

I can't say much about their remake of the Ealing classic, The Ladykillers, though. I haven't seen it yet and I do love the orginal. But I'd still like to eventually get round to it, out of curiosity.

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And when they were scored by Morricone, they became immortal.

Just my opinion, but no one does it better.

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Princess Bride.

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Pirates of the Caribbean, Star Wars and Lord of the Rings. They're already masterpieces as they are

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