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What do you think of home schooling?

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Kids usually get a sub-par education and stunted social growth. Can't be that good.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Don't see the point in struggling to educate kids at home with no proper teaching qualifications, no proper teaching aids & facilities and no peer interaction for the kids, when there's a perfectly adequate school just down the road. If you live miles and miles from anywhere it might be your only option, but if I lived miles from anywhere and the kids were little I'd probably insist on moving to somewhere more normal, both for the kids' sake and for the sake of my sanity.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Just to play devil's advocate here, wasn't home schooling how most people who had education were schooled throughout history? A tutor at home? And the "miss out on social growth" is a common misconception. School socialization is groupism, trying to fit in, remaining immature in a pool of peers well beyond the age when you should stop it. To turn it around, think how many socially retarded or inept kids you saw in school and how they got bullied or ostracized for their trouble. And how few of the kids in school could relate to adults or perform real-world interactions outside their age or peer group. In schools there are also the drugs, violence, bad-kids-drag-the-level-down problem. And the volume of wasted time is staggering. I've read that successful homeschoolers finish their academics in 2-3 hours, then have the rest of the day for real-world activities and interactions with real people. As for the quality of home schooling, it depends fully on the person doing the teaching. Saying that home-school education is below par is like saying home cooking is below par.

I'd say at the American public schools I attended before we switched to private, and at the schools my siblings' kids attend, the education is sub-par and their social growth is retarded. It perpetuates a sense of immaturity and forces a kind of lazy groupism where the perceived norm becomes the lazy limit.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

That being said, I think there is a lot of crackpot, religious or half-baked homeschooling going on, with terrible results for the kids. I wonder what kind of person it is that has enough time, education and commitment to home-school a kid from elementary age through high school? I would have loved to try it with my kids, but it'd require taking 20 years off work with no income or insurance. Also, they would rebel and wouldn't want to hear it from me. It might work through elementary school, then send them to junior and high school with all the other kids?

So I wonder how it works in practice. I think it must succeed only in special or rare cases. Otherwise, the local school was probably a better choice.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Good stuff badmigraine.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I think it can be good but it totally depends on the eduation level of the parents. Do you prefer your kids to be brainwashed by the system or by yourselves? Well, I'm exaggerating a bit - it doesn't have to be that way - you can encourage your kids to develop an open mind through home schooling I believe. As I will be a father next year, I hope to do supplement my child's education at home. For example, I don't have a clue about maths or science so will leave that up to the school but when it comes to languages, history, religion/philosophy, social sciences, well I plan to educate my child as much as I can but without becoming the proverbial home slave-driver.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Forgot to add one major Japan. As long as you live in Japan and you plan and hope that they will go to University, then you don't have a choice (i.e. home schooling is not an option) and that's something I don't like. I think kids who are home-schooled should be entitled to the same opportunities of getting into university but that probably won't happen in my lifetime unfortunately...... That's another system of control that I disagree with and think should be challenged: Stage A) high school→Stage B) university→Stage C) job→Stage D) retirement/permanent retirement (i.e. death)

Of course there are some people (entrepreneurs come to mind) who don't go through the education system for whatever reason and still succeed in life and I say good on them but as a basic rule of thumb you can't bypass steps a) or b) above.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

religion/philosophy

Here we disagree let the kid chose those for him-/herself.

I was raised as a Lutherian protestant and left the church at age 14(legal age for us to chose our own faith).

I am a Buddhist now and my family includes people of Christian , Islamic and Jewish faith too. We all get along.

Religion is a personal choice and should NOT be forced onto a child.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Wish there was an edit button!

"Forgot to add one major Japan" should read "Forgot to add one major point".

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Not sure of the results but Jesus Christ, if I had to stay at home all day and night as a youth I would have gone absolutely crazy.

1 ( +1 / -1 )

Many Fortune 500 companies are actively recruiting home schooled kids because of their creativity, well roundedness and out of the box thinking.

These days most major cities have home schooled support groups where children can socialize and develop friendships and so forth.

Home schooling is one of the best options these days I think.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

We homeschool in Japan, with a view to the children eventually going onto further education in the English speaking country of their choice.

Homeschooled children can and do get qualifications - they can take SAT's, IGCSE's or whatever suits their learning style and future hopes.

No homeschooled child has to stay home day and night, three to four hours a day at elementary school level, with social and extracurricular activities in the afternoon is more than sufficient.

The choice here is between incredibly expensive international schools, Japanese public schools which can lead to children having sub par English language skills, are hotbeds of bullying, and suck all the life and spark out of kids, or homeschooling. If we had just one child, we would have probably sent them to international school, but for three, soon to be four, it just is not an option. Even with two salaries the cost is prohibitive.

I give up having my own salary, my husband gives up his weekends and evenings, our whole life is centered arounds schooling the children. There is no need to have sub-standard materials, with a wealth of information available, and some amazing resources, which though pricey are considerably cheaper than international school.

My oldest went to fee paying international school for her kindergarten year, has also been to public school for a short period outside of Japan, and has now been home educated for the last three years. My youngest children have only ever been home-ed'ed. Whereas my oldest could not read very well at seven, and is just as bright as the other two, the children who have been purely home educated have both been reading well at 4 to 5 years old. Both my husband and I have degrees, which helps, but there are good curricula out there which need little more than supervision on behalf of the parent, for instance, Calvert, Sonlight and Laurel Springs.

We do Latin, Japanese and Spanish, all of the children have music lessons, and the oldest now plays in a band. There is plenty of fun, not just locked in the house completing workbooks all day!

It is a lifestyle choice which a lot of people have an opinion on, without much knowledge of the realities and possibilities, just their own prejudices.

3 ( +3 / -1 )

Best option ?!? My kids attend an excellent public school here in Tokyo. Lots of homework, lunch is served, great facilities, class size of 28. 2 minutes from the house. I can't imagine keeping them here all day & wondering how they'd learn the culture & social dynamics.

2 ( +3 / -2 )

Children who don't want to learn to be cookie-cutter kids? To bully and be bullied? To be taught never ever to think outside of the box? Children who don't mind eating something at lunch which looks something like pet kibble, and that is sometimes radioactive? Children who don't want to follow their interests? Children who spend every spare moment after school in soul-crushing juku? Perhaps. However, I don't want that for my children, and they are very happy and successful.

-1 ( +2 / -2 )

Japanese public schools which can lead to children having sub par English language skills, are hotbeds of bullying, and suck all the life and spark out of kids

There is no need at all for a child of English-speaking parents to have 'sub par English language skills' regardless of whether they go to school or stay home.

Bullying gets a lot of attention in the news, but keeping kids away from other kids is no way to deal with it.

Both my kids went to Japanese public elementary school, daughter to public junior high and high school, and I can assure you the pair of them have plenty of life and spark and speak fluent English and Japanese.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Dont worry homeschooler-there is plenty more of us out there. It's just that those who dont homeschool get the idea that you as a homeschooler are saying that those who public school just drop their kids off, and forget about them all day, which of course, isnt the case. But I admit the public schoolers do jump to the defense quickly. Most people just arent aware of it, although if you check out the HSLDA you'll find it is quite international. It is an option for educating your children. Parents have the right to choose how they educate their children and it doesnt matter whether you agree with their ideology or not. Like homosexuality-some people think it ought to be taught to children and some dont. It really is personal, and carrying on about protecting children from their parent's ideologies only places state ideology in opposition and need I at this time mention China? Japan in fact is very facilitating of homeschooling, and has many extra-curricular activities around towns to facilitate social activities. You also dont have to call it homeschooling. Ive seen books promoting the studying for high school certificates, and how the children can accomplish this a lot earlier than if they stick to the public system, as if they are some sort of genius. Of course there is night schools, or distant schooling, or online schooling, or even jukus themselves, will get your child educated and you and your families time more flexible. Most people have extended family too where they learn culture from, which really is the norm. Unless you want to say that state decided education is culture? Some people like to demand the education go onto tertiary level and some people dont deem that necessary, but it doesnt mean it isnt possible, same as for public school education. Some people just like to push our buttons and control the situation because they wont let on that there are other issues they are dealing with, usually, or theyre just ignorant or just total control freaks. I think homeschooling is a educational choice.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

cleo-so your answer to this question is; I wouldnt think to choose homeschooling. Or do you have something demeaning you want to say about homeschoolers in general, seeing youve not chosen homeschooling and are quite vocal about giving an opinion here?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Homeschooler, good for you. Your experience is the one I would've wanted for my kids if we could've homeschooled. I looked into it seriously when our first was just an infant. I even thought about training for a Montessori certification here in Japan, somehow. And I saw so many great materials and support available online.

But I can't quit my job and my wife can't support us. Even more so now that we have 4. So we use the local country public schools here in Kurashiki. It seems fine and joyful until about 2nd grade, where our eldest is now. Then you start to see the bullying, conformism, ostracism and the heavy Japanese cultural indoctrination is in full play. It's also stunning how much study time is required to master Kokugo and the Japanese writing system. This is several times more hours and load than I spent on "English" as s student.

I would like to get her and the others out of this system and into something where they learn that learning is fun and never ends, and have the joy and spark. I'd homeschool the younger ones if I could. School shouldn't feel like a 14-hour staff meeting five and half days per week. I never had that kind of grind, and I went to Yale.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@badmigraine

we use the local country public schools here in Kurashiki. It seems fine and joyful until about 2nd grade, where our eldest is now. Then you start to see the bullying, conformism, ostracism and the heavy Japanese cultural indoctrination is in full play. It's also stunning how much study time is required to master Kokugo and the Japanese writing system. This is several times more hours and load than I spent on "English" as s student.

Wow, things sound really bad in Kurashiki. Down here in Kyushu my kids had a great time at their public primary school. Fun classes, stimulating teachers, happy classmates and a mere one class a day of koukugo...exactly the same as I had in "English" at the same age in England. Happy times for them and us parents.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Happy times for them and us parents.

I dont get this? You might want to elaborate on that, because it sure is demeaning to public schoolers imo. Are you saying that homeschooling is good? Or are you saying that parents who homeschool arent happy? Or maybe I just dont get it.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@illsayit

You might want to elaborate on that, because it sure is demeaning to public schoolers imo.

How so? I was praising Japanese public schools. I said my kids had a great time there. One of my most positive experiences in Japan was seeing my kids thrive with the help of their teachers and the loving atmosphere that existed at their primary school.

Homeschooling I guess is fine for people who have the time and the zeal, but pretty unnecessary if you live in an area with a decent local school.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

do you have something demeaning you want to say about homeschoolers in general

No, I have nothing demeaning to say about homeschooling. If it's what you want, and you have the wherewithal to do it, go ahead.

But please don't come here and tell me that because I chose not to homeschool that my kids must have sub par English language skills, were either bullied or turned into bullies, had all the life and spark sucked out of them, were turned into cookie-cutter kids unable to think out of the box, have no interests of their own to follow and must have spent every moment out of school having their sweet little souls crushed in juku. You ask me if I have something demeaning to say? Don't you think it's all been said?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I don't know why people say that home schooled kid's don't get socialized with kid's their age properly. I mean whats wrong with just letting them go outside for a bit?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Homeschooler, can I ask you a question? If you had the money, would you send your kids to the International school, and if so, why?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Homeschooling I guess is fine for people who have the time and the zeal, but pretty unnecessary if you live in an area with a decent local school

So you are saying the public schooling is better? Whether there is a public school in the vicinty or not has nothing to do with it; just like choosing private schooling or choosing to do juku, it is all a choice about education. The why you choose one over the other varys quite a lot for a lot of families.

Though your point about time(not zeal), for example, is one reason why some people choose homeschooling; some people either like the idea of a one income family, or conversely some people like the flexibility that homeschooling allows, and therefore allows both parents to work.

cleo if you would reread-I wasnt attacking you. I think what happens is when homeschoolers state some benefits they have come across once they have started homeschooling, those who use other methods for education have a little tangle with their pride and start to say things like the very first poster.

It is silly for us to quibble about it. And as it is relatively new, compared to public schooling, in view of terminology that is (public schooling roughly 200years old, hsing roughly 50years old, and before that it was termed ....well elsewise, education maybe?!) From discussions Ive had it is hard for young adults who havent been homeschooled and they find themselves competeing in the workforce with home-educated people, and they get a sort of ripped off feeling. Like as if they have worked hard at school, and then to add on top of that they have had to sacrifice an especially time-filled relationship with family-but I guess that is just where the history of homeschooling is at, and we all have to keep our minds open to differences.

Tamarama-you seem to be fishing; what! homeschoolers must all have not enough money. So I'll give you this as an option. If you had the money, would you send your child to an international school to learn about say, Europe, or would you rather spend the money on taking a trip there, add in some texts and some books, and go and learn Europe for yourself with hands on eyes on experience??? Your point has no point unless you say what you think about homeschooling. The same as for public schooling, the dynamics of each family is different, from location to size to economics and more. Homeschooling is an eductaional choice, if you dont want to do that there is public schooling too, and in fact there are many other avenues. Sometimes we just arent aware of them all. And sometimes we wish we had of been aware of certain things, it doesnt make anybody under-rated or less of a parent. The question is though how much will you allow others to make their own choice.

Personally, my parents were hesitant about our homeschooling until they visited and saw what we did and how our family operated; I am proud of my parents that they said if they had to do it over again they would choose homeschooling. I am proud that they could talk like that.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

oops 'it is hard for young adults who have been public schooled, and find themselves in the workplace competing with homeschooled adults" is the comparison I was trying to bring attention to-Young adults with no children.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

And I should add that for a long time the home-educated young adults had to struggle for a long time being accepted into society, as if they were less than their public schooled fellow adults. It has been due to the grass work that was put in by a lot of people up till now that todays homeschoolers can hold their head up high

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

So you are saying the public schooling is better?

Homeschooling, public school, private school, international school, all have their merits and disadvantages. In some aspects, one will be better than another, but will lose out in a different aspect. As someone who is not a qualified or experienced teacher (apart from a bit of eikaiwa) I would hesitate to gamble my children's education solely on my ability to teach them - though I did choose to be very hands-on in their education.

I think what happens is when homeschoolers state some benefits they have come across once they have started homeschooling, those who use other methods for education have a little tangle with their pride

What happened on this thread was that one poster justified her own choice by slagging off all other choices (though she apparently ignored the choice of private Japanese school, stating it's a choice between the extremes of international or public or home). That's what got my goat. As I stated before, I have no problems with people who choose a different method of education, if they have the wherewithal - whether that's enough money to send their kids to international school, enough time/ability/confidence to homeschool, whatever - but I won't have folk slagging off my kids because I made a different choice.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Tamarama, if you had asked me perhaps two years ago if I would have spent the money on an international school if I could have afforded it for all the children, I would have said absolutely. Mainly because at that point I didn't have the confidence I have now. I was inexperienced, and worried about providing a good education for my different aged children. It is easier to pass the responsibility for things like teaching a child to read, and organisation of social activities to a school, rather than trust yourself to do those things! Now, to be honest I really wouldn't change a thing. I can provide a more rounded education for far less money, and I really have fun doing so, and more importantly so do they.

It is the worry that you might not be doing enough that really got me in the early years. Now Ive seen the results and am far more relaxed. We spent a few million yen on international k2 year for our daughter, and she left it without them even trying to teach her to read and though she wasn't unhappy there, she is happier at home and doing social activities as and when she wants to, with whom she wants to.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

illsayit

Your point has no point unless you say what you think about homeschooling.

Actually, I didn't make a point at all. I simply asked a question - I am interested to see what Homeschooler has to say about the benefits of homeschooling over the international school seeing that she has experienced both. Sometimes we learn things from discussion.

Don't be so touchy.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Cleo, I am sick to death of people "slagging off" homeschooled children and homeschooling parents. I have my reasons why I believe its better to homeschool then send children into the Japanese school system, why should I always bite my tongue when I read ignorant and offensive things about homeschooling? I have my opinion, and I have seen the results of children who goes to Japanese speaking school, and from what Ive seen, Cleo, any bi-cultural child sent to a Japanese speaking school ends up with non-native level English.

I would be even less happy about sending them to a Japanese private school, its the same culture of bullying and conformity, but you have to pay for the privilege!

I was not "slagging off" your kids, I was saying that from what Ive seen of the Japanese school system it really does not provide the kind of environment or skill set that I would want for my children. If I shouldnt take people "slagging off" homeschooling personally, then perhaps you shouldn't take my views on Japanese schooling so personally either.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Readers, please keep the discussion civil.

Bad Migraine, I was thinking, would it be possible for you to use Saturday and Sunday as school days, and if your wife is at home, have her teach three days a week? With a ready made curriculum and outside invigilation and support from an online school such as K12 or Laurel Springs it would be perhaps be possible. It would mean you having no weekend to speak of and the children having their break days midweek, which might be a deal-breaker.

Good luck!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

any bi-cultural child sent to a Japanese speaking school ends up with non-native level English.

And one kept at home ends up with native-level Japanese? Isn't that important, for someone living in Japan? As for the native-level English, if you have the ability to teach your kids English at home, how is that any different from them going to school and you teaching them English at home? It's what I did and it works, without having to go the whole hog giving up weekends. Sending your kids to school doesn't mean you're not allowed to teach them anything yourself.

a Japanese private school, its the same culture of bullying and conformity, but you have to pay for the privilege!

You choose your school. Some of my friends sent their kids to schools I thought were horrendous. My son's private junior-senior high was/is an excellent school, dedicated teachers, good academic results and at least for the six years he was there that I can speak about from personal experience, no bullying. And since they also have a scholarship system for the brighter kids all we had to pay extra was his train fare.

I was not "slagging off" your kids

Maybe you didn't intend to, but when you make blanket statements about Japanese schools turning out cookie-cutter kids with no interests, their souls crushed and unable to think out of the box, you are slagging off every kid that goes/went to a Japanese school, just as much as hoserfeller is slagging off socially-stunted, sub-par educated homeschooled kids. But at least he said 'usually'.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Online education is becoming more and more relevant and the quality is getting higher, so it may not really be a bad idea. I'd say online education is already better than offline education in many ways.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

If you don't think that you can teach kids at home then just look at <www.khanacademy.org>. EVERYTHING is available there. Well, nearly everything.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

If you don't think that you can teach kids at home then just look at <www.khanacademy.org> . EVERYTHING is available there. Well, nearly everything.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Homeschooler

So, you mentioned you access resources online, are they course outlines or curriculum that are tailored for homeschoolers attempting to educate their kids in a certain system, like say, International Baccalaureate or SAT? And you follow along with these, planning the lessons and assesments (do you assess them?) and covering all of the coursework yourself? Do their assesments and results get examined by an officiating body? I assume they will eventually need to sit exams, so how does this happen?

I'm just genuinely curious is all. You seem to be passionate and committed, so I'm interested in how it all happens.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Tamarama.

Year 1 of homeschooling

We bought a complete curriculum with online resources like Brain Pop, technology lessons in computing and typing, which were completed online, an i-library of astronomy resources, and reference tools. This was supervised by the accredited school, and my child had to submit work for marking every month. This also included testing.

Year 2

Added one child, but instead we put the curriculum together ourselves. It meant a lot more work for me, having a lot more confidence in myself, but was really enjoyable. I added Latin, Spanish and Japanese. Changed the math program to one that suited us better, and tinkered with resources. For instance, we were not taken with Houghton Mifflin and instead put together a language arts program together which was more interesting and rigorous. We also added more sport and music. We decided to drop the constant testing for the children, simply due to us being unbearable hippies and not seeing the point for under tens.

Younger child played, fingerpainted etc while we "did school". Im considering a montessouri approach for the youngest, rather than the "well trained mind" curricula that we have been using.

Year 3 We use a mix of the above, partly so Im not up at 2am preparing work for the children, partly because it is a lot more difficult with three different ages all needing to be educated. So we buy a 1st grade, 2nd grade and for my 11 year old an 8th grade curriculum package, then add the bits missing - the Latin, Japanese, better science and more critical thinking and logic work.

As my children are under 10, we are not following a SAT or Int. Bac program just yet! However in time we will return to an accredited online school and the children will get a high school certificate from the online school with outside invigilation leading to their SATS/ACT exams. This will mean my supervising/cheerleading/teaching some of the content, but all the assesment and some teaching done by the online school via online classrooms and tutors. I am looking at exam based UK qualifications, but since that system is in overhaul, it is not worth making any decisions there yet. From what I can see it would be possible to do a non coursework IGCSE or A'level course, and just take the exams to gain the qualification. As I said Im nowhere near there yet, and will give that more thought in time.

Right now we are concentrating on children being able to think critically, be competent in math, have a global awareness, read maps and so on. Putting the basics in there first!

I don't know where we will be in 8 years or so, but if we are in Japan still, we will travel to the US and they will take the exams in a regional exam centre.

For a high school certificate/college entrance I would rather go the route of an accredited online school with help preparing transcripts, however people can and do prepare their children for IGCSE's or Int Bac. and send them to take the exams at a regional exam centre. I have heard of people being able to take the exams at international schools in Japan, without having to attend the school there, and paying the exam fees only, if you know what I mean.

I only joined Japan Today to comment on this since homeschooling is close to my heart. Tama, there are great resources and forums online if you are interested. Im not interested in a slanging match with Cleo, despite her trying her very best to engage me, and will slink off to my usual comfortable, liberal, pro-homeschooling online home now! Ive wasted far too much time on this!

By the way, I agree totally, we LOVE KHAN academy, and recently found the oldest engrossed in lectures on game theory in her spare time (stealth boast).

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Homeschooler

Thank you for taking the time to answer that question so thoroughly. I admire what you are taking on and the seriousness with which you approach your work. It's quite courageous. I am interested because I am a school teacher who has lived and worked in Japan and will likely return, worked in an International school and am currently teaching in an IB school in Australia.

By the way, you should stick around the forum. There is a bit of rough and tumble from time to time but it's mostly for the sake of a good discussion.

1 ( +1 / -1 )

Homeschooler, thanks for that suggestion--I'd never even thought of that. I'm actually thinking of asking my work if they'll let me go to 4 days per week, with a proportional salary reduction. That would be fine for us, and Fri-Sat-Sun-Mon with my (Japanese) wife doing Kokugo and other stuff on the other days might just be fine. Frankly, we could make use of the local Kumon for math and Kokugo. The kids actually love it and the local sensei is incredibly good, loving and motivational.

If you don't mind posting again, how about another question: when I was considering homeschooling after our first was born, I found plenty of resources online and had no worries about the common criticisms and misconceptions. Instead what worried me was how to teach at home? Do you put on a teacher's costume and stand up front? Do you have the same meltdowns and sassy backchat during, say, math or English, to the point where the teacher-student dynamic is supplanted by angry kid-angry parent? It's sometimes hard to get our children to even put away their toys or clean up their own mess. How does homeschooling work when they don't cooperate? Do you make rules, use timers, have a dedicated space where you clear or drop all other issues before entering?

Frankly, this was the most mysterious and worrisome part for me. I figured I should just be the same kind of teacher as I am a father, but I wonder, does that really work in practice or for all ages...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@badmigraine

You sound like a very good father and very concerned about your kids' future.

If I were you, I'd send them to the local, state-funded primary school. I reckon you'll be delighted with the results : )

0 ( +1 / -1 )

illsayit

Your point has no point unless you say what you think about homeschooling.

Actually, I didn't make a point at all. I simply asked a question - I am interested to see what Homeschooler has to say about the benefits of homeschooling over the international school seeing that she has experienced both. Sometimes we learn things from discussion.

Don't be so touchy

I wasnt being touchy, if you want to find out about homeschooling there is plenty available online, and in Australia too, why come to a Japanese news site to seek answers? Homeschooler, is obviously still new to hsing, because if you base your language in English you will find there is plenty of support available. Whether that be courses or whatnot. In Japan it is still in the grass movement stage, and I for one appreciate homeschooler voicing a positive opinion about it. In fact Tamarama if you're a teacher, it is often teachers who find that hsing is beneficial and a better type of education route, but maybe you arent like that. Maybe you are one of the teachers who are worried about a job? Just asking, yk.

And as for cleos substantiating this as not being derogative

"just as much as hoserfeller is slagging off socially-stunted, sub-par educated homeschooled kids. But at least he said 'usually'."

Maybe I should guess at what you were referring to when you say usually.

Homeschooling can be done in Japanese too.Are you worried about non native speakers being able to learn the language of the country they live in? Just check out any hsing website about why hsing is possible. Maybe if some people were willing to state exactly what they thought, Id be more willing to share what I know.

I use external courses for my high school aged, mainly because of language, but my eldest is ready to graduate next year, and seems to have handled the Japanese based language external high school programme from my homeschooling her in Japanese as the primary language up till high school level....

SO as you see like public schooling, it is a lot more varied than just one way of hsing style. Some people will, like religion, try to break hsing into different types. When all is said and done it is education, and whether people want to say, if you have the will the time, it's gambling, whatever, the same can be said for public schooling, if youre not interested, if you want your daytime to do housechores and arent capable of organizing that with the kids, or if you prefer to work etcetc etc, it is just a slinging match. What I still dont see from most posters is the judgmental attitude being dropped.

If you need more information check out any hsing website, or otherwise you will only get one view of hsing.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Im happy to answer a couple more questions here. I can only speak for what has worked for us, and how we homeschool. As Illsayit said, I'm obviously no expert, and there is no one way to home educate.

We had a decompression period where I just strew educational materials, harmonicas, guitars, music theory books and art supplies around the house before they got up in the morning, and didnt push any compliance or work from them. That lasted about 6 weeks.

During that time they started to look at the materials I had left around the house/pick up an instrument/look through the websites open to them and began to ask me questions. Im not brave enough to "unschool" like this full time, but it did provide a bridge for us between home and school.

We had a weekly family meeting where we had a chat about home school, we set up the school room together, they got to choose supplies and desks. They made "school spirit" art and crafts, chose a name for our "school" which really helped them get the idea of what we were doing. I made it clear home school did not mean no school and what was expected of them. I then took requests for things they wanted to learn outside of the things they HAD to do.

With one child it was relatively easy. We sat down on the "school-room" sofa at the start of the day, looked at what we had on the lesson plan list for the day, and had a look through the days math. I never presented myself as authoritarian teacher, and do not allow them to call me a teacher. I am their learning guide. As hippy dippy crap as that might sound, for us, it worked. We worked together. Any teaching that needed to be done, was done with all of us sitting on the floor, under a tree in a park, on the sofa in the school room, or them at their desks and my flitting from one child to another, supervising and showing them how things are to be done.

More teaching intensive subjects, such as math, meant a lot more one on one time. I have now got a white board, to put methodology and ideas on. I let them draw on windows with wipe off pen.

I have not had any resistance from the children. If they get overly excited, anxious or struggle with a concept or idea, we step away for a few moments to decompress, and then go back to it after a bit of a sing-a-long. A few choruses of "walking down the line" with lyrics adjusted for what they are doing, for instance, makes them smile again, and we can go back to the problem subject with fresh eyes and attitude (Im doin' my algebra..Im doin' my algebra..dont know when Ill get this thing..Im doing my algebra...etc)...I dont expect them to take life and learning seriously, or to go to a new or complex subject with a heavy heart. THe day is always punctuated by learning games. My youngest boy was not happy with expanding his vocabulary, so we played describing games, for instance (A good game of "mrs Miggin's cat" has saved many a day in our house).

We do have a few rules. No interrupting someone else while they are talking, wait till they are finished, THEN talk, for instance. I found it works best when I am honest about what I expect, I am open about how much I expect to be done every day and what I want from them. I also use a system of rewards. They have to buy non educational computer and video game time with credits earned for good behavior, good work and effort.

No timers. When we are done we are done. We have a room given over to school, and only used for school. I expect them dressed and present at 8.30. I have to be tough on myself too to keep to this. If I feel they are overloaded, we take a day to do a nature trail, go sketching, visit a museum or a farm.

With the oldest child I can give them far far more leeway. I know once she has understood a concept I can let her run. With math she has an answer book, which is kept on my desk, and she can ask for it once I see she has completed all the work. With younger children I really have to ease off. More fun, more hands on manipulative learning. My middle boy cannot for the life of him concentrate on a science textbook, but give him the same information on a screen and he is entranced.

Ive had to chill out a lot. Ive had to manage MY expectations, and keep us all positive.

Im glad you have found good teachers to assist you. It has to help to have a bit of assistance!

Best of luck. Three years down the line I am so glad we decided to educate the children at home. I feel like I let down the oldest child by sending them out to school for a while, when I can see such positive results from the younger ones who have never been to a traditional school.

The well trained mind forums are very good, even if you don't subscribe to their philosophy. Im sure they will help with any further questions you have!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

illsayit

Jeez, you sure are touchy.

if you want to find out about homeschooling there is plenty available online, and in Australia too, why come to a Japanese news site to seek answers?

Well, because I am a regular and it just happened to be a topic that took my interest. Do you object to Homeschooler sharing her experiences?

and I for one appreciate homeschooler voicing a positive opinion about it.

So do I. That's why I asked her to expand upon it.

In fact Tamarama if you're a teacher, it is often teachers who find that hsing is beneficial and a better type of education route, but maybe you arent like that.

Are you actually reading what I wrote, or do you have me confused for someone else in this thread?

Maybe you are one of the teachers who are worried about a job? Just asking, yk

And this completes your ill-directed rant. To answer your question; no I'm not. In fact I don't know anyone in my profession who is concerned that homeschooling is a threat to their job. In fact, I've never heard anybody even mention it. Unlike you, obviously. I'm simply interested in it, is all.

Now read this last bit carefully.....I think it's very cool that Homeschooler is homeschooling her kids.

Just so we are clear.

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Thanks Tamarama, that was nice of you to say so, and for the record, it never came across as anything other.

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And as for cleos substantiating this as not being derogative

"just as much as hoserfeller is slagging off socially-stunted, sub-par educated homeschooled kids. But at least he said 'usually'."

Maybe I should guess at what you were referring to when you say usually.

I said it was derogatory. The homeschoolers who (rightly) object to it need to consider that their comments about 'cookie cutters', 'soul-crushing' and the like are equally derogatory and equally likely to rub people up the wrong way.

Like Tamarama, I think it's very cool that Homeschooler is homeschooling her kids. She's doing something I think would be beyond me. But I don't want her or illsayit slagging my efforts (not interested? want your daytime to do housechores?), any more than I intend to slag theirs. As you say, there is no need for a slinging (?slanging?) match.

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Do homeschooled kids get together sometimes with other homeschooled kids?

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I think it is a bad idea.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

no worries about the common criticisms and misconceptions.

It's not a mere criticism. Homeschooling is illegal for shogakko and chugakko. And there are talks about enforcing the law even for kids of foreigners.

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Thanks, Homeschooler. That's great, I always wondered how the practical part of it looked. Good for you!

@Lucabrasi - Thanks for the compliment, and same to you! My eldest is in the local public school, 2nd grade, and the others coming up through public kindergarten. We have no complaints about the course content or teaching--it is fine and even very good. The problem is that around 3rd grade and later, there is a lot of groupism, bullying and more and more kids seem to go bad. The future for most people here is low-paid agricultural work or local machine shops. In the middle school right next to the elementary school, there is a lot of colored or dyed hair, violent bullying and theft. I don't want my kids' future sabotaged by that, so we are looking for options, including private schooling, moving to another part of Japan, moving abroad, and/or homeschooling.

Homeschooling is really just private tutoring. In my own experience, private tutoring has been far more effective than group lessons for almost everything, including non-academic stuff.

The only questions are: is such a private tutor qualified and available; and how do you best meld the parent/child dynamic with the tutor/student one?

What I suspected, and what Homeschooler confirmed for me, is that there must be dozens of ways to do this well. It depends on you and your kids and what you are up to right then, and it isn't static--you can change and revise it anytime, and probably should.

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It is not illegal.It has nothing to do with foreigners. Dynamics of parenting and teaching can all be answered if you look into the subject more. Qualifications about what are you interested in?

People will only understand homeschooling when you give them terminology that suits their ideas on curriculum, which when you get past how society views hsing, you may call it touchy, I think you havent a brain to search things out for yourself, and youre using this forum and question to stir up trouble-dont you remember writing that you teach, and are thinking about coming to Japan to teach? I swear I read you writing that about yourself.

Once you get past the social viewpoints there is a lot of different ways of handling curriculum and teaching. In fact too many to bother writing here-but homeschooler should be paid for the ones she advertised! For example, I never use a reward system, I find the children are inclined to want to learn, and do whatever is set for the day. I dont think it needs rewarding,I think what has been learnt is the reward. I do think then that is the coach, which is technically a better word, you do need to take note of where the child is at and what stimulation or progress is being made or needed and how to adapt to their learning styles. But as there is so much out there to tap into, the hardest part is limiting your vison. Yes homeschoolers get-together sometimes. And sometimes they get-together with public school students, which I find in Japan, most public schooled students have no problem with understanding what hsing is.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Illsayit, wouldnt you agree there could be problems homeschooling if the parent had muddled grammar, thought processes and a poor writing style? For instance, how can a parent teach punctuation if they cant use a full stop to save their lives?

I was not advertising anything, Illsayit, and I resent the implication. It was a nightmare to get a handle on what was available and what was a well put together curriculum and service, and what was religious claptrap.

As for the legalities, it is not expressively illegal, but some would argue that it is not legal in Japan. That said I don't know anybody here who has had any major problems. We had to submit paperwork to the ward office and the local school, showing that we were registered with an accredited online distance school. In years where we did not use the "school in a box" method, we registered as part of an umbrella school, took the registration letter to the ward office and there were no problems at all. If you google "education in Japan, legalities" there is an excellent website laying out the legal position.

I would be on the first plane out of here if I was not allowed to homeschool the children.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Oh, Badmigraine, I forgot! You are welcome. Best of luck sorting out a workable solution to the problem.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I find it very sad to read some of the negative comments about homeschooling. I am fifteen and have a high standard of literacy and numeracy. I am well-educated and well-informed and very curious about the world. My family are radical unschoolers. In other words, rather than follow a set curriculum or a planned schedule, my mother allowed me to completely follow my own interests at home. If I wanted, I could choose to read all day. I learned a lot from doing research on the internet. One of my interests is virtual trading on the stock market which I'd like to turn into a career some day. Human beings made progress long before schools existed. Real education is about exploration, finding things out, developing ideas. None of this requires a school. It does require an enquiring mind and curiosity about the world. I wrote a book about my own experience of learning at home. Before assuming that children who are schooled (or unschooled) in this radical way will turn out to be uneducated or moronic, please keep an open-mind and check it out:-

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Unschooling-Teenagers-Experience-Maisie-Pine-ebook/dp/B06XQMZJQQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1495288034&sr=8-1&keywords=maisie+la+pine

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Unschooling-Teenagers-Experience-Maisie-Pine-ebook/dp/B06XQMZJQQ/ref=sr_1_14?ie=UTF8&qid=1531783185&sr=8-14&keywords=unschooling

This is the story of a home-schooled teenager who speaks for herself about the merits of home-schooling.

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