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What do you think of the #metoo movement one year on?

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It did some good, then lost steam as it was misappropriated for increasingly less congruous claims. Its ‘jump the shark’ moment was the claim against Azis Ansari, in which an awkward date became ‘sexual harassment’.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

It's just too early to judge. While I'm uncomfortable with the assumption that all sexual trauma must automatically scar survivors for life, there's absolutely no denying it usually sticks with them and can affect their relationships for a very long time. I think anyone who wants to assess cultural movements within 1 year of their origin is taking such a small view of history that their opinion isn't worth considering.

SevenseasOct. 5  10:42 pm JST

Its ‘jump the shark’ moment was the claim against Azis Ansari, in which an awkward date became ‘sexual harassment’.

Have you actually read the account of her date? https://babe.net/2018/01/13/aziz-ansari-28355 "Awkward" sounds pretty generous. In any case, "jump the shark" is a pretty dubious turn of phrase to use to describe this movement. Are you trying to say that women openly discussing their experience with sexual assault is bad because it's no longer entertaining to you?

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Have you actually read the account of her date?

Of course. Otherwise I wouldn't comment on it. I have read HER account of the date. And his. And I've read the debates around the veracity of her claims. Awkward sounds about right.

Are you trying to say that women openly discussing their experience with sexual assault is bad because it's no longer entertaining to you?

No, you are inferring that. I used a relatively common turn of phrase to make a point.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

From very reasonably calling out predators like Weinstein to outright lynch mob. Thats pretty much what i think of it. They have also yet to fully articulate the causes of the pay gap and have fallen into the same simplistic and extremely dubious analysis of it that the mass media puts forward.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

It's gotten stupid. I hope it dies a quick death.

1 ( +8 / -7 )

It's a croc.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Not nearly enough, as its barely scratched the surface. Privileged, entitled males and apologists for rape are laughing at women.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

I agree with Katsu78 that it’s too early to tell.

Sadly, it has brought out the worst elements from both sides - those who make sweeping generalizations about women and those who make sweeping generalizations about men.

These people can and should be ignored on this topic.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Sadly, it has brought out the worst elements from both sides - those who make sweeping generalizations about women and those who make sweeping generalizations about men.

These people can and should be ignored on this topic.

Bet you vote libdem and all, Jimizo.

Time to get off the fence and engage - this is not going to go away, you know. Throughout history, in every culture, women have been treated despicably. I'm only surprised it's taken this long for a backlash.

Metoo is the 21st century suffragette movement - there will be setbacks and disappointments but women will prevail and justice will be served.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

@Toasted Heretic

It’s just that I find your sweeping generalizations about men part of the problem. You wouldn’t accept sweeping generalizations about women and nor should you. Is it only about men, roughly half the population of the planet, where you feel it’s acceptable to generalize in this way?

I remember certain rightwing idiots claiming this movement is fueled by ‘misandry’. When I read your outrageously general statements about men and the ‘male ego’, I get the feeling these rightwing idiots could point to your posts as perfect examples.

As I said, very unhelpful.

Oh, I’ve only ever voted Labour. I didn’t vote at all in 2005 because I was disgusted about the Iraq War.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

JimizoToday  01:13 pm JST

I agree with Katsu78 that it’s too early to tell.

Sadly, it has brought out the worst elements from both sides - those who make sweeping generalizations about women and those who make sweeping generalizations about men.

Isn't even describing this with the words "both sides" itself a form of generalizing? After all, such language conspicuously ignores the behavior of individual participants in the MeToo movement to tarnish them with the behavior of anyone in association with them who behaves in a way you disapprove of.

I agree that people shouldn't be generalized by their gender. I'm well deep into anti-rape communities on social media and I almost never see it. Honestly the only times I really come across women being generalized is, well, when I come to this site. And the only times I really come across men being generalized is when I see women on my social media feed get fed up with the hordes of harassers who attack them for speaking out, so they troll the trolls with fairly obvious jokes.

One of the more touching stories floating around Twitter right now is a thread where women comment all the times guys in their life could have raped them, but chose not to. It's sad how a simple choice to respect a woman's right to decide what goes on with her own body can seem so marvelously rare.

But you're right - it's our actions that define our participation in rape culture, not our genders. When a person attacks a movement founded on the right of women and men to name people who have sexually assaulted them, molested them, and raped them, that's an action. And that action tells us exactly where they stand with regards to their participation in rape culture.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

@Jimizo

I hardly think observing that privileged, entitled males and apologists for rape are laughing at women is a generalization. You read the comments here - and I imagine you're a keen observer as well.

The message being sent out by the likes of Trump, Moore and Kavanaugh and their supporters is very detrimental to women. I'm not going to lose any sleep if a few men find it all too upsetting that their rights to get away with it are being eroded.

I'm not here to court popularity with right-wingers. They've made their stance perfectly clear. It's up to you who you chose to identify with, of course. But tiptoeing around male privilege, in case of offence caused, has to stop.

Yes, 2005 was a difficult choice. I might have voted Respect or Green in that one.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

@Toasted Heretic

I was thinking more of what you posted yesterday:

Unfortunately, the male ego is one of privilege and extraordinary fragility

I couldn’t believe that someone who often rightly shoots down people who make sweeping and negative statements about entire group finds it acceptable to post that.

I just can’t see why you think it’s acceptable to make statements like that about billions of people. Do you think it makes supporters of this movement look like they are really interested in justice regardless of what gender they are?

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

'a thread where women comment all the times guys in their life could have raped them, but chose not to.'

What does that even mean? Like 99.99% of the time?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

SevenseasToday  05:34 pm JST

'a thread where women comment all the times guys in their life could have raped them, but chose not to.'

What does that even mean? Like 99.99% of the time?

Hardly. It's more like stories about people who wound up drunker than they intended, or in a guy's car or at his place, or making out and got undressed or something, and then when the guy realizes they aren't wholly into it, the guy stops and says "let's have tea instead then," or something to that effect.

I'd like to believe that it's normal for guys not to take advantage of women in these situations. But the authentic gratitude that comes through these stories tells me the rate is no where near 99.99%.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Those who can stand up for themselves rather than tweet about it years later, sure.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Not nearly enough, as its barely scratched the surface. Privileged, entitled males and apologists for rape are laughing at women.

Nobody is laughing at women that have genuinely been raped or sexually assaulted, we are laughing at insane leftists who presume all men are sexual predators which seems to be a solid number of leftists at this point.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

One year on it's as ridiculous as when it started

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Good riddance.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It's high that sex assault victims speak out. But we must remember - rape + assault are that, acts of VIOLENCE, OVERPOWERING and DOMINATION - not lust, romance or attraction. People who commit sexual assault get their thrills from the sense of POWER, not physical or sexual attraction.

Of course everybody's hearing about boys getting molested too, by priests. That's in every religion and in every institution. Again, it's about fear and POWER. Many if not most of those offenders are not homosexual.

And on top of that - men get raped too. It's an ongoing problem in the US military right now and attraction or lust has nothing to do with it. 

Some women commit sex assault too, in various ways. Rape and sexual battery can happen to anyone, it knows no boundaries and it's high time to stop sweeping it under the rug. 

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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