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What do you think of the custom of tipping waiters, taxi drivers, etc?

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When I get tipped for doing my job, then I'll tip 'service' workers.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

'When I get tipped for doing my job, then I'll tip 'service' workers.'

I take it you're not earning the kind of disgraceful hourly rate paid to some 'service' workers?

3 ( +8 / -5 )

I think it a terrible custom. Pay these people a living wage!

9 ( +11 / -2 )

If someone has given me service over and beyond their job description, I'm happy to tip: if I'm expected to tip as a matter of course because the employer is too mean to pay a decent living wage, I find it insulting and demeaning to both the service worker and to me.

Pay people a decent wage in the first place. If that involves raising the price of items on the menu, or upping the meter rate, then fine. Don't expect me to insult working people by offering them charity.

13 ( +16 / -3 )

I hate it. I agree with Cleo - pay the workers a decent salary in the first place. There is a price on the menu, it should be the price we pay. Not some vague amount above that.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

One of the wonderful things about Japan is NOT having to tip. Stress free. Pay people a decent wage and give them free health care and free education. Do that, and their basic wages will get them by.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I personally love tipping, makes you work harder. I worked as a bartender for a few years and it helped me a lot to get through school. You pay for the service. I don't want to have to look for a waiter if I need more drinks or more of anything extra or even having to deal with someone that has a bad attitude because they woke up on the wrong side the bed. Most of the time when you get an hourly salary, there is often a lack of incentive to go the extra stretch. I made a lot of money as a bartender because I worked my butt off, made fantastic drinks and gave the best service to my customers. I feel like this, if some restaurants want to do aways with tipping, that's their choice, but when a restaurant has to increase their prices to 15-20% people shouldn't moan about the prices if the drinks cost more or the steak or even if they add in a table charge. They will never get rid of the tipping system in the US and if there are people that don't like the tipping service which is OUR system traditionally, then go somewhere else. But I believe you should be rewarded for your handwork in the food industry and not get paid just for showing up and if people don't like it, seek another profession that pays better, but if you want to work in the food industry in the US and you want to make a good living, tipping is the way to go.

-11 ( +2 / -13 )

They will never get rid of the tipping system in the US and if there are people that don't like the tipping service which is OUR system traditionally, then go somewhere else

lol Seems bass has been in Japan too long...It's our culture, you can't make us stop!!!

when you get an hourly salary, there is often a lack of incentive to go the extra stretch

Then again, maybe he hasn't noticed that serving staff in Japan tend to give superlative service even knowing they are not going to get any tips. Definitely a difference in culture there.

I believe you should be rewarded for your handwork in the food industry and not get paid just for showing up

So, maybe restaurant menus should display only the wholesale cost of the ingredients and rely on tips from the customer to pay the kitchen staff? Get the chef working his buff off turning them ingredients into a palatable meal. Maybe give a tip to the dish-washing boy, to encourage him to make sure you have a clean plate? How about the bloke who fetched the ingredients from the delivery van to the kitchen? A tip for not dropping your steak on the floor? If you really believe people cannot be expected to do their job properly unless you pay them peanuts and make them virtually beg for the rest (an assumption I find insulting), you may as well stay home and cook for yourself, at least then you know no one has spit in your soup because you didn't tip last time.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

lol Seems bass has been in Japan too long...It's our culture, you can't make us stop!!!

No, you got it just right.

Then again, maybe he hasn't noticed that serving staff in Japan tend to give superlative service even knowing they are not going to get any tips. Definitely a difference in culture there.

That depends on what you consider superlative. Japan is Japan and I understand and accept that, but in the States, there are a few (thankfully small) groups of people that want to try and give in a go ahead and experiment what service would be like without tipping and I will submit to you that the service will be just as bad as a lot of places in Europe, meaning the service (not the food....mostly)

So, maybe restaurant menus should display only the wholesale cost of the ingredients and rely on tips from the customer to pay the kitchen staff? Get the chef working his buff off turning them ingredients into a palatable meal. Maybe give a tip to the dish-washing boy, to encourage him to make sure you have a clean plate? How about the bloke who fetched the ingredients from the delivery van to the kitchen? A tip for not dropping your steak on the floor? If you really believe people cannot be expected to do their job properly unless you pay them peanuts and make them virtually beg for the rest (an assumption I find insulting), you may as well stay home and cook for yourself, at least then you know no one has spit in your soup because you didn't tip last time.

Here we go with the old, "you didn't build that" line again. Like I said, I travel weekly and have been to 47 countries and there is definitely a huge difference when you tip a person. I like good service and I don't settle for mediocracy. I work for my money and if I can't get the best, then I just won't go back, in the states, I have always had the best service for the most part wherever I would dine out. I prefer the tipping system, worked for me and I do believe working hard will get you ahead and also, if you don't want to pay through the roof every time you eat out, you would want to eat at an establishment that has good and decent prices, but if you get rid of the tipping system, you would pay more, which is the case in Seattle and that's why so many restaurants are going under.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

depends on what you consider superlative

Pleasant, friendly service. No need to 'look for a waiter', no 'bad attitude', no 'lack of incentive'. People doing the job they were hired to do.

Here we go with the old, "you didn't build that" line again.

No idea what you're talking about. I haven't said 'you didn't build that' even once, never mind again.....

there is definitely a huge difference when you tip a person

No, there is definitely a huge difference when you don't tip a person who thinks they're entitled to a tip.

if you get rid of the tipping system, you would pay more

I don't see how that's a problem. Higher fixed menu prices so that the staff can be paid a decent wage, or lower menu prices plus tips which would come to about the same. Higher menu prices with no tips means less hassle, more dignity, less bad attitude and no excuse for poor service.

As an aside, why do you single out the food industry as needing tips to get people doing their jobs? Do you think people should tip university professors for a particularly interesting lecture (or, by your standards, for a not-totally-boring lecture)? Tip bus drivers/airline pilots for getting you to your destination without crashing? Ground crew for not losing/destroying your luggage? Doctors for giving you the right medication/treatment? Newspaper reporters for producing interesting, accurate, unbiased coverage of the news, with extra if they manage to avoid typos and blatant opinion-mongering? Why limit it to restaurants and taxis?

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Pleasant, friendly service. No need to 'look for a waiter', no 'bad attitude', no 'lack of incentive'. People doing the job they were hired to do

Maybe if I go to my local cheap family restaurants, I wouldn't expect much....like....uhh, Burger King.

No idea what you're talking about. I haven't said 'you didn't build that' even once, never mind again.....

No, you didn't, but the rant smells so much of having a tad socialism embedded in them.

No, there is definitely a huge difference when you don't tip a person who thinks they're entitled to a tip.

Even in that situation, I give them something, but definitely NOT what they expect and way below the 15% line.

As an aside, why do you single out the food industry as needing tips to get people doing their jobs?

I had a strong feeling you were going to bring that up.

Do you think people should tip university professors for a particularly interesting lecture (or, by your standards, for a not-totally-boring lecture)? Tip bus drivers/airline pilots for getting you to your destination without crashing?

Their salaries are exceptionally higher than that of a food server, come on now...

Ground crew for not losing/destroying your luggage? Doctors for giving you the right medication/treatment? Newspaper reporters for producing interesting, accurate, unbiased coverage of the news, with extra if they manage to avoid typos and blatant opinion-mongering? Why limit it to restaurants and taxis.

Doctors make a very, very and in the news media even higher, but well that's something that we just won't discuss what the salary can be it varies, but it is definitely higher then any food server can get or doctor for that matter. You're making an apples to watermelon argument once again. We are talking about an job entry level industry where you flexible working schedule and you can start at an early age with no experience. You are working to gain knowledge about what it is like to work and these jobs are designed as a temporary stepping stone before you move on to something else that will make that transition to making more money into having more experience as a worker in the society combining that with skills knowledge of your educational background. That transition to making more money into having more experience as a worker in the society combining that with skills knowledge of your educational background.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

As a former waiter who often made great money in tips, I think the tipping system is demeaning and sometimes just inane.

For the first, the tipping system implies that the worker is a beggar. It also implies (as bass, in fact, said) that they won't do their job unless enticed with the promise of a tip. Why not make all service work tip based, then? Dentists, lawyers, massage therapists, sales clerks, landscapers, nannies, etc. can all grovel for tips. And, hey, that means if you don't tip them, they don't get paid! How wonderful is that?

For the inane part, I paid my rent in less than 2 hours of pouring Dom Perignon for a small party one afternoon. If they had been buying Spanish wine, I would have worked just as hard, but for a fraction of that. If they ordered food instead, I would have worked 5 times as hard for a fraction as well. Why should a lunch waiter make a fraction of what a dinner waiter makes, simply because the prices go up?

Which leads to part 3: Waiters are incentivized to make your meal as expensive as possible, and to get you out the door as soon as possible so they can turn the tables. That's why I love Japan, no guilt trip if my table isn't ravenously hungry and ready to order wine. Waiters are also incentivized to become your "friend" and entertain you. American waiters just won't bring the food and leave you alone. They hover and come up with lame jokes and whatever else they think will work to make you like them. Except go away and let you enjoy dinner.

Charge proper prices, and pay proper wages. Use proper management to ensure good service, like every other business does.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Thank you commanteer. From the horse's mouth, as it were.

the rant smells so much of having a tad socialism embedded

And not paying people a proper wage is capitalism?

Their salaries are exceptionally higher than that of a food server, come on now...

You've just admitted that food industry workers would do a better job if they got paid better.

We are talking about an job entry level industry where you flexible working schedule and you can start at an early age with no experience

OK. So are you going to tip the person who works the till in your local convenience store? The person who sweeps out your office and cleans the toilet before you come into work each day? The boy who delivers your newspaper every morning? The people who empty your dustbin? The girl who checks your ticket and shows you to your seat in the theatre/cinema? The teenager handing out tissues/flyers on the street corner? The lifeguard at the beach/pool where your kids swim? The bloke who guides your car round the road works so that you don't drive into the big hole they're digging? How about a tip for the people digging the hole? You'll tip the bloke who brings you your meal, but not the guy in the back who cooked it, and not the person who washes your used plate?

You are working to gain knowledge about what it is like to work

No. People in low-paid jobs are working because they need the money.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

It's a crazy and illogical system. Whey would you pay twice for the same service? And as the customer you often end up either feeling cheated because you paid too much, or feeling stingy because you didn't pay enough. You never know until you see the reaction of the tippee.

The tip system also encourages the tip-targeted non-service whereby the server engages the customer in unnecessary chitchat, ostensibly of a personal, friendly nature but actually exactly the same every time and not enhancing the customer experience any.

Japan definitely has this one right!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

As to the argument that people need incentive to work hard - they already have that incentive. It's called 'a paycheck'.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

And not paying people a proper wage is capitalism

The beauty of capitalism is, if you don't like the job or career that you are in, you can better yourself, create something, get a higher education, make yourself more competitive, that way you can demand a higher salary, what you make of yourself depends on you, how motivated you are, what you want to do, what you want to be, your choice. There is no ceiling.

You've just admitted that food industry workers would do a better job if they got paid better.

Yes and if they don't want to hustle, then they shouldn't expect a good tip. I was a hustler when I was working as a bartender and I did very well. You get out what you put in.

OK. So are you going to tip the person who works the till in your local convenience store? The person who sweeps out your office and cleans the toilet before you come into work each day? The boy who delivers your newspaper every morning? The people who empty your dustbin? The girl who checks your ticket and shows you to your seat in the theatre/cinema? The teenager handing out tissues/flyers on the street corner? The lifeguard at the beach/pool where your kids swim? The bloke who guides your car round the road works so that you don't drive into the big hole they're digging? How about a tip for the people digging the hole? You'll tip the bloke who brings you your meal, but not the guy in the back who cooked it, and not the person who washes your used plate.

These are all temporary jobs, not to mention, that's our system, "tipping" and it's always been like that and the reason why especially in the finest restaurants we have the best service is because of the tipping system. If other countries don't have it, I have no problem with that and I don't expect great service, but in the states, I do and I usually always get it.

No. People in low-paid jobs are working because they need the money

As well as the experience or as a temporary stepping stone to advance and get something better.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Yes and if they don't want to hustle, then they shouldn't expect a good tip.

sigh You know you just contradict yourself and go around in circles? If people are paid a decent wage they don't need to 'expect a good tip', they're already getting paid for doing their job, just like you and me. I for one don't want over-keen staff 'hustling' me when all I want is to enjoy a nice leisurely meal. (That word hustle isn't one that's in my everyday vocabulary, and from the way you use it I thought maybe it had some different meaning in American English. So I looked it up in my American dictionary and, no, it does not seem to have any good meaning even on your side of the pond. Why would anyone out for a good time, nice food, friendly drinks, want to be hustled? If the prospect of a tip makes waiters hustle, that sounds to me like one more argument against tipping.)

These are all temporary jobs, not to mention, that's our system, "tipping" and it's always been like that

You mean you do tip all these low-paid, entry-level jobs? You must walk around haemorrhaging money all day. Does it make you feel good?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

sigh You know you just contradict yourself and go around in circles? If people are paid a decent wage they don't need to 'expect a good tip', they're already getting paid for doing their job, just like you and me.

Actually, I didn't, but if you think about it, if you are a good server and you hustle, you WILL make more than the minimum wage, which equates to a very good salary in total. Again, I expect good service, I'm paying for that and if the food server takes good care of me, there is a huge incentive for that. I like, depending on what I am eating my food prepared a certain way (I'm paying for it, so I have the right to have it the way I want it) and the waiter that listens and takes care of me, they get paid very well for it, that's why I never have a problem in the states.

I for one don't want over-keen staff 'hustling' me when all I want is to enjoy a nice leisurely meal. (That word hustle isn't one that's in my everyday vocabulary, and from the way you use it I thought maybe it had some different meaning in American English. So I looked it up in my American dictionary and, no, it does not seem to have any good meaning even on your side of the pond.

Jeez! But it does in a colloquial sense of the meaning and please don't try to educate me on how we are supposed to speak in the states. It was never a problem EVER where I'm from until you felt to you that it has some kind of negative connotation to it, which is totally absurd.

Why would anyone out for a good time, nice food, friendly drinks, want to be hustled?

I think you mean, hassled. I just want them to put some stank on it. Google that.

If the prospect of a tip makes waiters hustle, that sounds to me like one more argument against tipping.)

What? Hey, if you don't like it that's on you, but I support tipping and will continue to do so, it helped to pay my way through University and I'm grateful for it.

You mean you do tip all these low-paid, entry-level jobs? You must walk around haemorrhaging money all day. Does it make you feel good?

What on Earth are you talking about, Cleo???

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Worked in a restaurant in my mid-teens as a bus-boy. The waitresses and us pooled all the tips and at the end of the evening, divided them as even as we could by the number of the people who had worked the shift.. Also, we did not get them at the end of that shift. They were added to our checks!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I for one don't want over-keen staff 'hustling' me

I agree with this and all Cleo's other comments on this thread. I absolutely hate tipping.

One of the wonderful things about Japan is NOT having to tip.

I agree, but there are odd behaviors. After living in Japan for 15 years, it was only after returning to Scotland that I discovered it was normal (for a certain generation anyway) to tip doctors. I know some Japanese 80+ year olds here who give their Scottish doctors a bottle of whisky every now and then, and who chide me for not following such a "common courtesy".

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I hate tipping. It is an evil practice that exploits workers and cheats the taxman. It is also quite recent. 100 years ago, tips were given to cover unforeseen costs, such as retrieving and delivering a customer's forgotten umbrella.

It spread from that based on greed and exploitation, not from any business rationale.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Again, I expect good service, I'm paying for that ...... that's why I never have a problem in the states.

And here in Japan we also get good service, without the indignity of tipping. You're basically saying that people in the states who don't tip, do have a problem - they get bad service. I don't see how that's a recommendation for tipping.

Jeez! But it does in a colloquial sense of the meaning and please don't try to educate me on how we are supposed to speak in the states....I think you mean, hassled.

Actually I was trying to educate myself as to what it was you were trying to say. Regardless of how you're 'supposed' to speak in the states, this is a board in Japan not the states and we're writing not speaking. If you want to get your opinion across, it's helpful to use expressions people can understand, and to take note when something you used with one meaning is taken up in another meaning - it means you are failing to communicate. The word hustle as I understand it, and as the dictionary defines it, when used without an object, is to engage in prostitution. Now do you see my problem?

I just want them to put some stank on it. Google that.

Thank you, I did. Apart from the smelly meaning, it seems to mean you want people to fall over themselves in their efforts to gratify you. Again, not dignified for either party. I don't want no stank from waiters, taxi drivers or shop assistants. Just nice, friendly, efficient service from people who have pride in their employment, thank you.

What on Earth are you talking about, Cleo???

You said tipping waiters was good because their's was a low-paid, temporary, entry-level job. I asked you if you tipped all the other low-paid, temporary, entry-level jobs that help make your day run smoothly. I take it you don't; you only tip the guy in the restaurant (because it makes you feel good playing the master?)

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Dislike it with a passion.

If it's "expected" then make it part of the price and in turn pay the people a decent wage, with decent support and benefits, especially in countries without public health care etc.

Something extra for exception service is something completely different.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I'm with Cleo on this one; I don't mind tipping if it is deserved. What I DON'T like is the inclusion of 'gratuities' in the bill and the general expectation of tips otherwise that has evolved since tipping began. Now even if you get crappy service you can sometimes be yelled at if you don't tip, or if at a bar and you don't tip for the bar staff simply passing you a drink then you get ignored. Tipping USED to have a purpose, but for the most part the system is broken.

Now some nations are adopting the tipping system. When I went to Thailand a few weeks back our ticket agent explained to my wife that you need to tip for most services these days. It's only 2% or something like that, but you could see a difference in service from when I went there last and there was none of this tipping at all. It no longer seems like they are doing their jobs for the sake of their jobs anymore, but also waiting for tips.

It's like key-money in Japan. You used to give that over to a land-lady in exchange for that person taking care of the renter and constantly watching out for them. Now you sign at a real-estate company with a bill that just includes key-money, period. So now you still have to tip in certain cultures, but they don't necessarily give you the good service to warrant it. And I've been on both ends, having worked in the restaurant industry in Canada for more than 10 years, including waiting on tables.

I think the system should be stopped, and retooled, and any waiter or waitress who is receiving less than minimum wage so that they can get tips should get a wage increase and that's that. If people don't like doing their jobs anymore because they don't get tips, let them quit. At some point reintroduce tipping ONLY for exceptional service. In any case it should NEVER be mandatory or included in the bill.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Please please please watch this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_vivC7c_1k

Tipping is a stupid custom that we have been brainwashed into believing is normal and good.

For those who don't want to watch, here's the gist:

In America, at one point, tipping was considered bribery. During prohibition, when money was a lot tighter and businesses (mainly restaurants) were making MUCH less money because of lack of alcohol...they began encouraging staff to accept tips because they couldn't pay. Now, it has become an obligation.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Tipping is basically businesses shifting risks/costs to employees and customers. Any reasonable society should ban it.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

And here in Japan we also get good service, without the indignity of tipping.

That's Japan's system, they give great service for the most part, but if I have any problems, I can't get the specialized and attentive service I want, I just get what I get, even if the staff are in a bad mood, I just have to deal with it and again, that's ok, I'm in a different country and I respect the system, even if I don't always agree with it, but in the US, we have a different system and I can get what I want and how I want it and I like that.

You're basically saying that people in the states who don't tip, do have a problem - they get bad service.

Yes, because that's our system. We have a tipping system and if people don't like it, they can always go and find a place that doesn't tip, there are options, but I don't frequent those establishments usually.

I don't see how that's a recommendation for tipping.

For some, they might feel like you and there are people that prefer the system we have in place currently, which is the group I belong to.

Actually I was trying to educate myself as to what it was you were trying to say. Regardless of how you're 'supposed' to speak in the states, this is a board in Japan not the states and we're writing not speaking. If you want to get your opinion across, it's helpful to use expressions people can understand, and to take note when something you used with one meaning is taken up in another meaning - it means you are failing to communicate. The word hustle as I understand it, and as the dictionary defines it, when used without an object, is to engage in prostitution. Now do you see my problem?

Not really. I think you're cherry picking and micromanaging colloquialism way too much. It's really not that serious.

Thank you, I did. Apart from the smelly meaning, it seems to mean you want people to fall over themselves in their efforts to gratify you.

No, I just want good service. If I'm paying $70 or more for a meal, I expect very good service. I have that right in the states, it's my money, I worked hard for it, so I don't want to settle for less.

Again, not dignified for either party. I don't want no stank from waiters, taxi drivers or shop assistants. Just nice, friendly, efficient service from people who have pride in their employment, thank you.

I expect that as well and if these people do an exceptional job, I'll reward them as well.

You said tipping waiters was good because their's was a low-paid, temporary, entry-level job. I asked you if you tipped all the other low-paid, temporary, entry-level jobs that help make your day run smoothly. I take it you don't; you only tip the guy in the restaurant (because it makes you feel good playing the master.

I got what you said, but I was talking exclusively about the food industry and in the US we have a tipping system. So NO, I don't feel like anything and when I was on the other end, I never looked at a customer like they are my masters, just strictly as a patron wants exceptional service, which I'm glad to provide, but if I felt that in anyway, I would feel like I was a slave, I would not have chosen that profession in the first place.

I support it and I don't wish it to go away. I don't care what other countries do, but I like that, I can generate a lot of money in this system.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

@Bass

I used to be a bartender too. I'm just wondering what kind of fantastic service you used to give or expect from others. I used to smile and say 'Yes.....( fill in the name if known)' or something like 'What can I get you?'. I'd give them what they asked for ( I'm a drinker and I know how to mix a drink ) and I'd always say thank you when giving change.

Can I just ask what I should have been doing? Maybe I'm a cynical Brit but I tend to find staff buzzing around my ear asking 'Is everything to your satisfaction, sir?' extremely irritating. Were you flipping bottles over your shoulder and dancing like a tit behind the counter?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I used to be a bartender too. I'm just wondering what kind of fantastic service you used to give or expect from others.

A big fat tip.

Can I just ask what I should have been doing? Maybe I'm a cynical Brit but I tend to find staff buzzing around my ear asking 'Is everything to your satisfaction, sir?' extremely irritating.

I personally don't. Because I know (1) when I need a waiter, they make eye contact and I don't have to look for them. (2) if my order is not to my liking, I can change it, add to it, customize it, they take care of me. I really like that.

Were you flipping bottles over your shoulder and dancing like a tit behind the counter?

No. Didn't have that ability, but I am good looking and that helped out a lot with getting great tips.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

If I'm paying $70 or more for a meal, I expect very good service. I have that right in the states, it's my money, I worked hard for it

If I'm paying $70 (or the equivalent - upwards of ¥8,000, not likely I would ever be paying in dollars) I also expect very good service. I have that right here in Japan, it's my money, I worked for it (can't say I work all that hard, there's plenty of time for play) and if the bill says ¥8,000 I want to pay ¥8,000, not an arbitrary ¥10,000 or whatever the going rate for tips is. I don't want to agonise over whether the speed at which my meal appeared, or the perfect temperature the wine was served at, deserves an extra how-many percent. If the service is good, I'll go again. If it isn't, I won't. Having a tipping system is bad service.

Mind, if I'm paying a lot less for my meal, I still expect (and in Japan, get) very good service. So I do not get this 'tips get you better service' thing at all.

if these people do an exceptional job, I'll reward them as well.

But you said higher up the thread that you reward them even if they don't do an exceptional job. In your own words, Even in that situation, I give them something. So it seems your tipping is not all about getting good service?

I was talking exclusively about the food industry

Which is why I asked you to clarify your position with regard to other industries. Why don't you tip every low-paid entry-level worker you come across? What's special about waiters?

I think you're cherry picking and micromanaging colloquialism way too much.

Nah, just pointing out that your communication skills have room for improvement.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

'No. Didn't have that ability, but I am good looking and that helped out a lot with getting great tips.'

I see. Not a dry seat in the house when you were pouring a glass of lager, eh?

It's just that I thought tips rewarded professional service and motivated the staff to go that extra mile according to your ideas. I fully agree about the looks thing from experience. I worked with a bone idle stunner who could have the locals salivating like dogs and had you worried about losing an eye if a blouse button pinged off. She did more than okay for tips. I can't say she went that extra mile.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Maybe I'm a cynical Brit but I tend to find staff buzzing around my ear asking 'Is everything to your satisfaction, sir?' extremely irritating.

One restaurant owner in New York where I worked really hated that as well. He told us never to ask "how is everything", or even worse, "how is your meal?" His reasoning was that the customers were paying premium prices for a great meal. And that's what we delivered. Asking how the meal was made it sound like we didn't know what we were doing, very unprofessional.

Not to mention many customers aren't crazy about having their meal interrupted so they can be coerced into saying "Great food, thanks!" If the meal is great, I compliment the chef, but I don't want to be forced to comment on unexceptional food.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

If the waiter barman or whoever has gone out of their way, to provide a service that exceeds their basic job description Absolutely I always tip.The diference is between,. A good waiter and a great waiter, can certainly enhance your dining experience, you see most of the time service isn't included in your dining experience , so anything in anticipating the customers needs ,from getting a toothpick to topping up the wine,is conducive to the outcome of the dining experience..

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Tipping is wrong. Pay a decent wage and get a good job.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

So I notice a lot of Americans on here but just wanted to speak up for the Canadians... Unless things have recently changed, most if not all the jobs that require tips are actually paying minimum wage. As a waitress in high school and university, I would make minimum wage plus tips. The tips would be way over my actual wage since I could "hustle" as Bass put it. It was nice, but the more I think about it, it is a system that should really be done away with. I was always happy to get 10% but now it seems that 20% is the going rate. I really don't see why I should have to feel obligated to pay that much more for a service that is a necessity of the job (wait staff brings the food, taxi driver drives, hair dresser does hair...)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If I'm paying $70 (or the equivalent - upwards of ¥8,000, not likely I would ever be paying in dollars) I also expect very good service. I have that right here in Japan, it's my money, I worked for it (can't say I work all that hard, there's plenty of time for play) and if the bill says ¥8,000 I want to pay ¥8,000, not an arbitrary ¥10,000 or whatever the going rate for tips is.

And I respect that. It's your choice, but I also have the right to eat and dine the way I want.

I don't want to agonise over whether the speed at which my meal appeared, or the perfect temperature the wine was served at, deserves an extra how-many percent. If the service is good, I'll go again. If it isn't, I won't. Having a tipping system is bad service.

Again, I respect your opinion, I don't agree with it, but I respect it. I love to tip and I want it to stay in the states.

Mind, if I'm paying a lot less for my meal, I still expect (and in Japan, get) very good service. So I do not get this 'tips get you better service' thing at all.

I understand. But I grew up with it, so I feel the exact opposite from you.

you said higher up the thread that you reward them even if they don't do an exceptional job. In your own words, Even in that situation, I give them something. So it seems your tipping is not all about getting good service?

No, it is about good service and even if the service was bad, I give them something, but nothing compared what they could have received had they given a bit more effort.

Which is why I asked you to clarify your position with regard to other industries. Why don't you tip every low-paid entry-level worker you come across? What's special about waiters.

I did clarify my position and we were talking about food servers. That is the industry that depends heavily on tips, great tips provided the customer gets great service.

Nah, just pointing out that your communication skills have room for improvement.

I just was about to say the same about you as well.

I see. Not a dry seat in the house when you were pouring a glass of lager, eh?

Ale and Stouts were more in demand for us.

It's just that I thought tips rewarded professional service and motivated the staff to go that extra mile according to your ideas. I fully agree about the looks thing from experience. I worked with a bone idle stunner who could have the locals salivating like dogs and had you worried about losing an eye if a blouse button pinged off. She did more than okay for tips. I can't say she went that extra mile.

I wasn't insinuating anything like a sexual innuendo if that is what you are eluding to. I meant, whatever the customer wanted as far as drinks or concerned. That is what I was talking about .

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I did clarify my position and we were talking about food servers.

Actually you side-stepped and didn't answer, but never mind. The question as asked is about tipping, not tipping specifically confined to the food industry. Do you tip taxi drivers for driving you from A to B as required? I'd tip for extra work and effort, such as helping with heavy bags or driving round looking for a place I wasn't too sure of or getting out of heavy congestion, but not for just driving.

I just was about to say the same about you as well.

In what way, exactly? What did I write that you didn't understand, or that caused you confusion? Did my British accent cause you problems?

I meant, whatever the customer wanted as far as drinks or concerned.

What have your good looks to do with the drinks?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Actually you side-stepped and didn't answer, but never mind. The question as asked is about tipping, not tipping specifically confined to the food industry.

Not side stepping the issue, because I already explained in detail why I support it.

Do you tip taxi drivers for driving you from A to B as required?

In the states, of course.

I'd tip for extra work and effort, such as helping with heavy bags or driving round looking for a place I wasn't too sure of or getting out of heavy congestion, but not for just driving.

If you want, I might do the same depending how n the circumstances, but as far as the States is concerned, food industry the hotels and Taxi drivers, that's pretty much it for the most part.

In what way, exactly? What did I write that you didn't understand, or that caused you confusion? Did my British accent cause you problems.

Something along that line.

What have your good looks to do with the drinks?

A lot, my dear. A lot.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I tip taxi drivers in the UK, but when I tried it in Japan I got a confused look - it was after that I realised they didn't expect to get a tip. On the day I check out of my hotel I normally buy the staff a nice box of chocs, though.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Bass I wasn't 'eluding' to anything ( I hope you tip your proofreader at work - the poor sod must be absolutely exhausted ). I'm just wondering how people without your ability to make men or women weak at the knees fared with tips at your bar. As you said, your good looks went a long way to seeing you make money. It's just that it doesn't seem in keeping with your idea of tips being a reward for professionalism or motivation to work harder. I've seen it myself with the head-turning young woman I worked with behind the bar.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I wasn't 'eluding' to anything ( I hope you tip your proofreader at work - the poor sod must be absolutely exhausted ).

Poor what?

I'm just wondering how people without your ability to make men or women weak at the knees fared with tips at your bar.

We all did well, but as far as the men wer concerned I always came on top with more tips.

As you said, your good looks went a long way to seeing you make money.

This is very true.

It's just that it doesn't seem in keeping with your idea of tips being a reward for professionalism or motivation to work harder. I've seen it myself with the head-turning young woman I worked with behind the bar.

I don't agree, but that's just my opinion.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I wasn't 'eluding' to anything ( I hope you tip your proofreader at work - the poor sod must be absolutely exhausted ).

Poor what?

It's a British English term... ;)

Were you flipping bottles over your shoulder and dancing like a tit behind the counter?

No. Didn't have that ability, but I am good looking and that helped out a lot with getting great tips.

My jaw actually hit the floor at that statement... how vain are you? Carry a mirror with you?

Back on topic and I find it's not even tips that Japanese staff don't expect, it's a 'thank you'. I was on a bus on one of my first trips to Japan and I thanked the driver when I got off, as I do with any bus I take wherever... he seemed genuinely surprised. I don't believe in tipping waiters and other serving staff though... nine times out of ten they practically fawn over you, ingratiating themselves in the hope that they'll be graced with a small gratuity. That's what I like about Japanese waiters, they don't expect a tip but they still give you good customer service.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I hate it.If you do something outside of your job description in going the extra mile,then sure.But with Americans it’s expected just because they served you.Going to Guam in December.Uggghhh!!!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I agree with Cleo, especially the point about employers paying their staff a decent wage in the first place. However, most part time restaurant jobs here fail to do that and yet the staff are still more attentive than in some countries where tipping is the norm. Haven't been able to get my head around that one.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I used to date a table games dealer at a casino yrs back. She only made about $9 per hour, but she would sometimes make up to $500 per day on tips alone.

So tipping can be a good thing in that environment. As for me, I don't mind tipping at all. If you're not satisfied with the quality of the service- then don't tip.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

My jaw actually hit the floor at that statement... how vain are you? Carry a mirror with you?

Don't need to, I have confidence.

Back on topic and I find it's not even tips that Japanese staff don't expect, it's a 'thank you'. I was on a bus on one of my first trips to Japan and I thanked the driver when I got off, as I do with any bus I take wherever... he seemed genuinely surprised.

I do the same wherever I go, as pretty much everyone should, so what is your point?

I don't believe in tipping waiters and other serving staff though... nine times out of ten they practically fawn over you, ingratiating themselves in the hope that they'll be graced with a small gratuity.

I almost never get that, even at my local diner. Maybe you have been frequenting the wrong restaurants.

That's what I like about Japanese waiters, they don't expect a tip but they still give you good customer service.

Often, but not all of the time.

So tipping can be a good thing in that environment. As for me, I don't mind tipping at all. If you're not satisfied with the quality of the service- then don't tip.

Exactly.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I once won about ¥120,000 playing Lupin the 3rd. I would've loved to tip some of the kind and hospitable staff and drink servers. Everyone can use a little extra harmless earned cash from tippers.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@kaynide

Thanks for the youtube link, it's informative and funny:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_vivC7c_1k

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The worst service in the world is in tipping cultures, particularly the U.S.

US: Customers have to say thank you to the staff. Customers are a nuance. SIlverware and plates are dirty and the customer should be thankful they're getting served at all.

Japan: Staff say thank you to customers, and customers are gods.

I'm going through culture shock being back in the US right now and seeing how disgraceful the service is. Everyone is completely incompetent, and they don't care. Even Starbucks have a damn tip jar on the counter. Are you frikking kidding me?

Oh, not everyone is bad, just most of them... :)

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The worst service in the world is in tipping cultures, particularly the U.S

So don't tip.

SIlverware and plates are dirty and the customer should be thankful they're getting served at all.

And likewise, Japan has its fair share of "hole-in-the-wall" Ramen Shops and dirty-dusty Izakayas.

Everyone is completely incompetent, and they don't care

Not everyone. Try staying away from the cheap 99 cents Fast Food Menu.

They care, they just don't think you are a "GOD", just a customer. You've been pampered and brainwashed to think service in japan should be such anywhere you go. Japanese are too demanding like this when they go abroad.

Even Starbucks have a damn tip jar on the counter. Are you frikking kidding me?

Ahh . . . now here is a point in which I agree. Just do like me- Don't friggn' tipp em' then!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

US, worst customer service period.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Hahahaha..... back at school, I earned more just from tips alone than some of my friends, who did similar work but had a set hourly wage. If customers like how you did, they're more than happy to give ya more than what the establishment charges.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Its good and a nice reward for their service and helps these people who are already doing a very difficult job on a very low wage. I did both jobs when I was at university and even a small tip made my day or night actually. Its great to feel appreciated.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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