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Where do you like to buy furniture in Japan?

31 Comments

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31 Comments
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We were given expensive furniture items others did not want. Some we inherited. Others from big garbage days. The rest are from online sites.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

When I was younger and full of energy, I built my furniture. That way, I could ensure that it would fit snuggly with the available space, both vertically and horizontally.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

When we moved into our Tokyo town house all those years ago, my father said to buy the best furniture you can afford.

As result we avoid hand-me-downs and garbage (bad vibes) and have mostly 松本家具. It is a type of Japanese traditional furniture made in the city of Matsumoto produced since the Edo period. It is appreciated for mixing tradition with modernity and becoming comfortably warm with continuous use. 

Also, I got some nice things from the Oriental Bazzar on Omotesando back in the day before the internet destroyed the antique market. For example, a very nice Chinese altar table from the late Qing dynasty and a Meiji sword case for my small sword collection. Unfortunately those days of getting such quality antique furniture with a good eye are over.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Never “Nittori” and rarely “Ikea”. There’s a very nice used shop in Kasama in Ibaraki where my wife and I get our “retro” fix.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

We don't have any particular favourites, but did buy a Japanese-made Laura Ashley dining table set and a couple of chests of drawers. We also got a couple of recliners from the American company Ashley, as the ones from Japanese retailers were much too small.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

I love furniture shopping. It makes life totally worthwhile. I like to pile up as much furniture in my 1LDK as I can. Mostly from Nitori and Ikea. I find these places really know my taste in furniture.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

I love furniture shopping.

I know people who collect furniture. Good stuff is easy to sell.

https://www.antique-yamamoto.co.jp/

0 ( +2 / -2 )

no furniture needed at all here.

so answer is-none.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

All the furniture we were given and inherited were valuable traditional antiques that would have been very expensive to buy. Some required cleaning but the results were well worth the effort. Previously good furniture was found in the big garbage. Nothing wrong with recycling another's junk.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Previously good furniture was found in the big garbage. Nothing wrong with recycling another's junk.

Ones junk is another man's treasure.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

My father was a renowned cabinet and furniture maker. His training gave me a good eye to spot a worthwhile piece of furniture even below all the dirt and grim.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

There needs to be more recycling of old furniture. Many items like cupboards can be painted with decorative painting like "sponging" for instance to turn them into interesting items.

https://i.pinimg.com/736x/87/dc/70/87dc700feef0b295c0ca53e992b6d005.jpg

2 ( +4 / -2 )

The Japanese and Chinese furniture aesthetic really suits our house.

Another place we shopped a lot at was called Mori furniture gallery near 調布. It has since moved. It specialised in Chinese and Japanese reproduction furniture. I got a nice Tibetan cabinet there before the move.

My father was a renowned cabinet and furniture maker.

Is that your American father? The Great Depression era was a hard time for artisans. We might have some of his work somewhere. But the cats like to scratch it so we keep it on the shed.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Is that your American father? The Great Depression era was a hard time for artisans. We might have some of his work somewhere. But the cats like to scratch it so we keep it on the shed.

No, my British father. I had two fathers. My British father's family were renowned furniture makers. My father didn't make furniture in the 1920's since that was the decade of his birth. You don't even know his name.

I guess you just can't help posting personal insults. You can never just keep it civil.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

We bought our bed in Muji, the only item from a "flat pack" furniture company. We like it because It is a simple sturdy minimalist structure. The Zen aesthetic helps us sleep well.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

recycle shops

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Recycle shops are quite rare but can be good places for buying items.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

When it comes to antique furniture which is highly priced there are the rogues turning out fakes and reproductions.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Not from my experience. No easy profit in it.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

There are many fake antique and reproduction companies.

Company list.

https://companylist.org/Japan/Furniture_Furnishings/Antique_Reproduction_Furniture/?sort=n

Many fake dealers had been hoping for big sales during the Olympics but it didn't happen.

There are counterfeit items for contemporary goods.

Japan consumer watchdog warns of fake furniture, interior websites touting huge bargains

https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20230427/p2a/00m/0na/014000c

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Plenty of money in fakes and reproductions.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I bought the most expensive items used on Yahoo Auctions. Shipping can be a killer for furniture, so anything I buy has to be really good, in great condition, and at a big discount, but its out there if you look for it. Japanese people generally look after stuff, so its a good country to buy stuff used, not just cars.

We have the odd cheaper thing from Muji, Noce, and even Nitori. Sometimes for chairs and beds, cheap furniture can be surprisingly comfortable. For a bed, you can always just change the mattress or add a topper.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

When it comes to furniture remember the principles of wabi-sabi, (侘寂).

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Remember the antique furniture paradox:

when you are buying, the dealer says it's 侘寂; when you are selling, they say its ぼろぼろ...

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

The most important furniture item we buy is the bed. For decades we used futons but for the past decade, we have used a Western bed with a high-grade sprung mattress. Having a good bed is important for sleep and well-being.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Nittori and second hand shops. Ikea for some stuff.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Hayama Garden. Don't know about now but they used to have stuff you won't find in most others' homes.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I collect woods, sometimes given by neighbors and I make it by myself on my day off. All without nails.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

We bought our dining table set from Nitori, a bench seat from Tama living, and I have made some of my own furniture. Most expensive piece was our sofa which we bought from Ishizuka kagu. We had been looking at several places for a sofa… were just about going to go with leather reclining but I’m so glad we didn’t.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I just use zabuton,futon and low table ,and a rusty old sun lounger for the beach outside.

More room for my bikes and surfing accoutrements.

Keep my legs and back flexible at least!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Muji. Good quality. Lasts forever. Pricey but worth it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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