Voices
in
Japan

have your say

Where do you shop for high-quality French bread in Japan?

53 Comments

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

53 Comments
Login to comment

Basement of any Department Store (?)

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I like Maison Kayser at Tokyo Midtown and Breadworks in Omotesando. Department stores are good, too. I often drop by Johann in Mitsukoshi in Ginza.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Paul in Kagurazaka

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Bake your own.

It isn't that difficult.

-10 ( +5 / -15 )

Bertie, seeing how this is Japan, how many households do you know have an oven big enough to fit dough, steaming water vessels and cloth necessary to back french bread? I would say that makes it mighty difficult.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

The bakery at the entrance to Yokohama station is very good and not just for French bread but many varieties.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Bake your own. It isn't that difficult.

Yeah, but the question isn't asking that, is it?

Paul, or Andersen because they have shops near where I live.

I also like Aux Bacchanales. Their Bierschinken sandwich is the best in Tokyo.

Bigot is good too.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Is french bread the really hard one? I buy my bread from Yamazaki :D Its not french, but its good!

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Viron at Tokyo station, Paul has decent pain au chocolat. As for baking baguette home good luck! But the prices are so high for a baguette, it costs 110Y in France and around 300Y in Japan ouch...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

how many households do you know have an oven big enough to fit dough, steaming water vessels and cloth necessary to back french bread? I would say that makes it mighty difficult.

Oven size and steam are not issues. Make two short loves instead of one and toss in water every now and then. The problem is that most ovens don't get hot enough. I make bakery-quality boules, but it's not possible to match a top bakery baguette in a standard home oven.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

any of the Paul chain,Viron and a great little place in Yoyogi Uehara called 'pour vous' @Bertie; Lucky you to have the time.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Tokiyo-san,

We have this Toshiba oven:

http://global.rakuten.com/en/store/nakaden/item/10008138/

The temperature goes up to 350C and it has a steam function.

Doesn't take up much space and provided you have the right ingredients and know what to do, it gets the job done. It makes beautiful bread.

If you shop around, you should be able to pick one up for about 50,000 yen.

Moderator: This isn't what the question asks you.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Ansen in Nishi Ogikubo. A small family run bakery and their french bread is lovely, their apple pies are the nuts too!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Why can't I get a fresh baked Italian loaf, is my question.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It would be great to find some nice, freshly baked ciabatta as well!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Easy answer any store that sells fresh brreeeeeaaaadddddddd

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

ah, and I forgot Dominique Saibron, but their prices are a little on the steep side! 90292 - Probably NOT convenient for you, but there is a bakery at Komaba-Todaimae that does great Ciabatta, fresh out of the oven, plenty of oil - nice big squares .

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

You guys supporting Paul... Paul is OK, but Maison Kayser has them beaten. If you're in Kagurazaka for the bread, go off the main road and head over to the Kayser. It's some of the best-tasting bread I've ever had.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Why people think French bread is so wonderful? Too hard, I think. I don't like a French food.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

warearenihonjin

because dipping shokupan in oil and vinegar would = inedible soggy mess. Dipping french bread in oil and vinegar however... <3

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Vie de France. I think they have the best. Not only the price is reasonable.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

come on seesaw1....Vie de France not even at the races.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

warewarenihonjin,

Why people think French bread is so wonderful? Too hard, I think. I don't like a French food.

Don't judge French food too harshly. There is very little real French food in Japan, so it's highly likely that you have only come across "Japanese-style" French food. Real French food in France can be wonderful.

The sauces are very important in French cooking and French bread (the baguette) is perfectly designed for it. Inside it's light, like a sponge, to soak up the sauces and the outside is crisp and "hard" so that your fingers don't get covered in sauce.

For "warewaregaijin," Japanese shokupan is too wet and soft.

That's why this topic is about where to buy good French bread.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Dean and Deluca has a great bakery range, but steep.

http://www.deandeluca.co.jp/ourproducts/bakery/

@Wareware: far too bataa kusai to not know what side your baguette's Nutella'd on.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

DONQ

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Does anyone know of any good French bread places around Roppongi / Akasaka?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Paul in Azamino

2 ( +2 / -0 )

in nagoya its got to be Blanc pain absolutment delicieux...

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

dcog - Paul at Roppongi Itchome Station ( Namboku Line ).

3 ( +3 / -0 )

PAul. His bread is great. I like his sammiches, kinda overpriced but welcome to Japan. =^_^=

0 ( +1 / -1 )

French bread is a little more than baguette. Andersen, based in Hiroshima in a beautifully reconstructed building that was partially destroyed by the A-bomb, has a great variety of French breads. Pain au Levain, Pain de Campagne, and a lot more. They have a lot of artisan bread to offer. But there are also more and more shops springing up in Hiroshima offering sublime baguettes, like Baeckerei Ein http://www.backerei-ein.jp/

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Forget about baguettes. I can't even find any decent brown bread. Most of the bread here is marshmallow designed to give a sugar-boost. Hello, fiber anyone?

Yamazaki produces the vilest of them all.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Pukey2,

Yamazaki produces the vilest of them all.

I think it's probably Mother's Pride relabelled.

But I agree with you. And I totally agree about bread made with wholewheat flour.

You can get wholewheat flour here, though . . .

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

French bread? Heck, how about high-quality Wonder bread? tee hee

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

So what's wrong with DONQ? Are you just being snobs because it's a chain or is it because you really think their bread isn't good? Personally, I'd eat DONQ bread any day over some of the bread I've had in France in the past...

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

dcog9065Apr. 16, 2013 - 06:57PM JST Does anyone know of any good French bread places around Roppongi / Akasaka?

Maison Kayser in Midtown, great.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

USNinJapan2 - I would eat bread from DONQ, but I wouldn't call it french bread...The question is for "high quality french bread" after all.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@Eppee Ah awesome thanks very much, actually I've noticed that shop a number of times but never been in so I'll definitely check it out.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Of the places in my own area (Ueno/Okachimachi) I've always been partial to Andersen--lots of variety, baked on site, great baguettes and peasant loaves.

Nothing decent in the neighborhood supermarket...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Stephen, Andersen is indeed excellent; I wish they still sold the big round bread with cheese chunks in it for ¥398 like they used to. Now that I live near a Kayser, I never go to Andersen anymore.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Robuchon is good. Paul and Bigot too. Fauchon.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

warewarenihonjin: There's a good chance the 'French bread' (baguettes) you have chosen in the past were not all that good. Freshly baked baguettes are absolutely delicious, and French cuisine, while not amongst my favourites, is also quite good in general.

That said, I'm kind of with Pukey on this one; I have very, very rarely seen anything but white bread and weird snack bread (ie. filled with butter or chocolate, etc.). I would LOVE it if supermarkets took a few of the 5 slice white bread packages and replaced them with some rye, some whole-wheat, and some pumpernickel, for example.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

smithinjapan

I would LOVE it if supermarkets took a few of the 5 slice white bread packages and replaced them with some rye, some whole-wheat, and some pumpernickel, for example.

Don't forget sourdough.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

There is a great artisan in my street. There are thousands of great artisans that craft small batches of bread made over days, with fine ingredients, their sourdough, etc... The baguette is like the onigiri, you have good or bad ones (of both), but it's plain daily products. Eating hot baguette just out of the oven is like eating raw cake dough. Kids love it and normally later, they start finding that a bit gross and heavy on the stomach. It's not healthy, you ingest some gas that didn't get the time to fall down. The high quality white bread tastes better from hours after baking, till the 3rd day. A "pain de campagne" (the daily bread in my family) is eaten from second to 7th day. "Pain de mie" (shokupan) should be also be good 2 or 3 days. So if you wonder what quality you get, buy bread, wait 2 days...and you will see if you have quality or crap. If it is crap, get yourself a 5000 yen "home-bakery" machine, and you'll get a hot "pain cube" without having to go shopping in pajama. Note that in Japan, you have to sleep very late. In France, bread batches arrive on the shelves at 4 or 5 a.m. and in Japan, it's more 4 or 5 p.m. It's improving lately.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Andersen

Andersen is an institution and they've maintained high standards. Everything started there. All the great chef bakers were trained in Hiroshima. My idol is Nishikawa (bakery "Comme Chinois" is Kobe).

Paul

"Paul" is a fast-food chain, it's the French "Subway". They have stylish deco for their shops and they will shine in the transfat pond as long as "Vie de France" and kombinis grace us with their improbable baked inventions.

So what's wrong with DONQ?

Nothing. Most supermarket have a guy that bakes the same baguettes as DONQ. They are decent to eat on the same day.

steaming water vessels and cloth necessary

That's to make the mochi no ?

There is very little real French food in Japan I'm kind of with Pukey on this one; I have very, very rarely seen anything but white bread Don't forget sourdough.

Form a club the frustrated shoppers in Japan.

Hello, fiber anyone?

You're constipated ? Try "deru-deru cha".

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Cos

Anderson - Will agree with you there Paul - come off it, where are all these "transfats" as you claim? DONQ- Supermarket baguettes exactly - too soft and no texture - ie no crunch, no chew. Steaming water and cloth - that is not for mochi, lots of french breads use this method.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Paul - come off it, where,,,

Read the labels someday. BTW their corporate name in Japan is Pasco. I am not on a crusade against food industry, but you can't be a giant chain that produces bread by thousands of tons and pose as an artsy artisan for a long time. There is a lot of competition.

Steaming water and cloth - that is not for mochi, lots of french breads use this method.

I don't doubt that everything has existed. But anyway, if that's the only recipe you like, I still don't see the problem to get a table cloth and a steaming basket in a Japanese kitchen.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@Brainiac

Johann in Mitsukoshi in Ginza.

They definitely have the best "pains au chocolat !

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Levain - Tomigaya : at the top for years! For real bread "campagne, complet, baguette": La Terre - Ikejiri & Shibuya Foodshow: Very dedicated japanese artisan. "Bio baguette, melange" Gontran Chennier - Shibuya: New on the Tokyo scene with a creative approach. "curry baguette, good prices Maison Kayzer - chain already mentioned - reable source of daily bread

Viron & Saibron are over priced

Kobe-ya, Donq, (even Paul) etc... They are just selling industrial products, as for french, bread have to be baked on the premises (by a certified baker)

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

No, thanks! I'll stick to German "Roggenbread" can't be beat and is much, much healthier.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

currently i like viron. maison kayser used to be good when it was only the denenchofu store but since they have expanded quality has fallen.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

My one suit case will be filled with all French and German bread when returning to the USA. I plan to freeze these for future use. they are all the best of best and delicious..Ah...................................

0 ( +0 / -0 )

SmithinJapan etc: To get pumpernickel, I've had to import it (pumpernickel meal) from USA and then use my Costco breadmaker to bake the bread. My friends love the bread - and that sweet pumpernickel taste - great. I had to get some dark molasses and caraway seeds, but that's pretty easy in Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites