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Which company makes the best cameras?

20 Comments

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Leica? Maybe Hasselblad? But for cheap consumer cameras, nothing beats a Canon Powershot.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Bronica and Nikon for me.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I will go with Pentax for me, because their lenses are usually more affordable.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Believe it or not, Sony makes some innovative and interesting cameras.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If anyone can "Canon' can :)

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Pretty vague question... compacts, dslrs? video cameras?

Presuming we are talking about DSLRs, then nothing beats a Canon or Nikon. Sure other companies make great cameras too, but what makes Canon and Nikon special are the huge variety of lenses available for them.

I must say that I am a Canon user, but they have some serious QC issues and have really lost the plot regarding new lens releases in the past couple of years... I'm hoping the 7D Mark II will be something special, or I may find myself switching to Nikon.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Casio Exilim. Now if they had DSLR'S I would totally go for one.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

A lame attempt by JT to stir the pot. They could just as easily be asking, "Mac or PC?"

The best camera is the one in your hand. I've seen wonderful, artistic photos taken with a cell phone. (And not just iPhones.)

I have cameras by Nikon (DSLR) , Pentax (medium-format film) and Canon (point-and-shoot). I even have a 1960's Yashica rangefinder on the way. I make my living with the Nikon, but could do the same with any other DSLR.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Interesting question.

The simple fact is, given the technology today, almost any camera gives quite good results, if you look at it from the point of view of what to expect from your budget.

I've been very happy with my Canon S95 for a point and shoot.

DSLRs are great, but a huge investment in terms of both money and time spent learning and also the sheer effort of lugging them around everywhere.

Also, you have to think about what you will be photographing. I don't have many opportunities for wonderful photo shoots that might justify an expensive DSLR... not to mention that I don't have the money to buy one.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I personally know a professional photographer who made a small fortune selling creatively edited pictures taken with an HTC Desire smartphone. He works in marketing now.

For him, no Hasselblad, Nikon or Canon will ever beat his 3 year old phone.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I've got a high end Panasonic digital camera (not a dslr) that has done me good for four years now. Will never get rid of it as long as it holds up. If I was to take the plunge and buy my first dslr it would probably be a canon.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Out of experience, I would have to say that depending on the type of shot you are trying to take but Nikon, Canon and the iPhone camera take really good shots. Other cameras produce a fair picture but a shot taken that produces depth, good color and great hues would all depend on the lenses too.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The most important piece of equipment is the person holding the camera

1 ( +1 / -0 )

it's not the camera which makes the photographer, it's the photographer which makes the camera.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

But it is the smart photographer who picks the right camera for him or herself.

Who makes the best cameras. For long range usability, handling and optical brilliance it has to be Leica's rangefinder line. You can get a 60 year old M3 serviced as easily as the latest M9. Even odd balls like the M5 and CL have their followers. You can use nearly every Leica lens made on any Leica M body. Leica costs, however.

For durability and versatility the top of the line professional Nikons rules. My all-time favorite is the F3.

In Medium format Hasselblat, Fuji, Mamiya and Pentax shine.

I've always admired Olympus but their stuff is flimsy. I think the Pentax LX, which has a cult following, is a brilliantly designed camera but weak, while its accessories are flimsy.

Professional photography is not strongly grounded in digital imaging. The trouble is that digital cameras become outdated too quickly.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Kabukilover, almost all professional photography is now digital.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I like the K10d because of its weather resistance. I tend to use it in pretty inclement weather, late at night, at the beach, the mountain, while boating, fishing, in snow, rain, and it's always done well. Only problem is the battery dying in me a little earlier than I expected because of the cold, but other than that, works like a charm.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It really depends what you are looking for in a camera. We have both a DSLR and a small point and shoot. In the small camera l cant go past Canon. We have tried a few different types but Canon seems the most reliable and user friendly. With the DSLR we started out years ago with a Minalta SLR and then went to an Olympus DSLR, then a Canon DSLR, now we are using a FujiFilm DSLR and cannot fault it. Its rugged, easy to use, takes great pictures and is just better all round compared to our other camera's. But l guess its up to the individual and their requirements and preferences.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Olympus.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Wilco.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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