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Which martial arts would you recommend to someone wanting to learn a means of self-defense?

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krav maga

1 ( +4 / -2 )

Any martial art if the teacher is of good character.

1 ( +4 / -2 )

It depends, there are many factors to consider from the cost to the persons daily schedule or if it's a child, woman, senior citizen, overweight person, self-esteem issues etc. I have been doing martial arts since the age of 9. Did 10 years of Tae Kwon Do, 25 years Aikido, 4 years Brazilian Jiu Jutsu. My kids do Karate. I asked them if they wanted to do, Judo or Aikido, Karate was more appealing to them, I didn't want to push them, it just all depends on what appeals to you, if it fits with your lifestyle and if you will stick with it, there is no right or wrong choice. As sillygirl mentioned, find a good teacher, look around and ask some of the schools if you can sit and watch a class, some will let you do a tryout, make sure you feel comfortable with the instructor. Japan is a bit limited on various styles of martial arts compared to the States, but in the bigger cities in Japan, you might have a lot more choices. Personally, I would love to learn Krav Maga, but I have never seen or heard of a Dojo in Fukuoka. You also need to think what do you want to get out of it. Do you want to learn from a self-defense point, or spiritual one. Whatever you do or the choice you make, don't rush, take your time and see for yourself, never feel pressure from anyone to push you what they think or feel you should do, go by your own intuition and make your own judgement.

1 ( +5 / -3 )

As a martial artist who wants to one day open a Ryukyu kobudo (okinawan weapons) dojo I would love to see people take an interest in that. However for practical every day self defense in case you are attacked I would suggest karate.

There are other more important issues to keeping safe than knowing a martial art though. There have been a number of cases where people don't cry out for help because they would be embarrassed.

1 ( +3 / -1 )

Tai Chi.....because it is healthy for you as well and does not strain the body.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I would definitely recommend Muay Thai Kickboxing or Western Boxing as the best 'Self defense' arts. Although both physically demanding, you will learn how to punch quickly and effectively, and the aerobic exercise will help you run away. Krav Maga, although I'm not a fan would also be a suitable choice.

This assumes you don't want to spend years developing a traditional Martial Arts skill set. The aim of self defense should be to create the opportunity and situational awareness to avoid and escape danger. You don't want to waste time learning high kicks and artistic Kata.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Ducka dapunch.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

This assumes you don't want to spend years developing a traditional Martial Arts skill set. The aim of self defense should be to create the opportunity and situational awareness to avoid and escape danger. You don't want to waste time learning high kicks and artistic Kata.

I agree, but for some people they might not have the strength to punch or kick (met enough people that just aren't so physically strong) so maybe for those wanting something softer, traditional might be better, but again, it just depends on what fits you and what your goals are.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Self defense is an imaginary condition. Philosophy and training make one capable. Avoiding danger is the greatest form of 'self-defense'. Travel with friends, maintain options and sustain awareness. Danger is a predictable event. Amazingly, the human animal is instinctual and self defense begins with habit.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Aikido. If this is a question from someone in Japan then you will have access to Aikido instruction.

Taijiquan takes too long. There are martial applications but they aren't emphasized, or trained, as a rule.

Krav maga looks brutal to me. Effective for sure but you could severely injure or kill someone, thereby making enemies for life of either your injured opponent or the deceased's family and friends. You know: people looking for revenge after the defeat. Warfare is one thing. Self defense another. Not to mention legal ramifications.

Check out examples on YouTube of the martial arts you find available in your area.

But I emphatically agree with "not-so-silly" girl above. Make sure your teacher is of good character. That may be the most important thing, as I found out. If you have any doubts about the teacher pass on by. Life is too short. Continuing could do more harm than good.

There are sometimes short "self defense" courses offered. See if there is something like that in your area. Contacting a ward or city office might put you in the right direction.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Ecky-Thump. It incorporates some everyday items into self defense..

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Krav maga.

"Avoiding danger is the greatest form of 'self-defense'... Danger is a predictable event."

Sorry, but those people who were killed by that crazy lunatic in Akihabara a couple of years ago could in no way predict that.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Self defense is an imaginary condition.

Not when someone is putting a beating on you!

Philosophy and training make one capable. Avoiding danger is the greatest form of 'self-defense'. Travel with friends, maintain options and sustain awareness.

Sometimes you can't be with people, most people are alone.

Danger is a predictable event.

If that were the case, then we wouldn't have muggings, theft, murder, rape. All of these could be avoided.

Amazingly, the human animal is instinctual and self defense begins with habit.

In the real world, it all plays out differently.

2 ( +6 / -3 )

Aikido

3 ( +5 / -2 )

I have been doing boxing and wrestling for many years. Pretty useful should the need arise I think. There are other good "arts" of course.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Krav Maga and Judo/Aikido. Krav Maga on the other hand also teaches firearms and knife training hence should you be outnumbered and you aquire an opponents weapon, you'll know how to use it. It also teaches that you fight... to run away.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Aikido is great for self defense. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu or wrestling are the most dominant, but if you have more than one opponent neither of them is particularly helpful.

For overall self defense, doing MMA (Mixed Martial Arts) is going to be the best to study. It teaches stand-up and ground fighting, and how to effectively defend against both of them.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Not looking for trouble has kept me from ever needing to use whatever little self-defense I know. If you are truly cornered by a mugger, etc. then go for the chin, eyes or throat then run like hell.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Aikido is great for self defense. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu or wrestling are the most dominant, but if you have more than one opponent neither of them is particularly helpful.

Depends.

For overall self defense, doing MMA (Mixed Martial Arts) is going to be the best to study.

In your opinion. Not everyone is cut out to do MMA.

It teaches stand-up and ground fighting, and how to effectively defend against both of them.

Yes, but not everyone has the strength to physically defend themselves using brute strength alone. I can do it because I'm a big guy and that alone usually gets people to watch what they say, so I have a great advantage of avoiding conflict, because it avoids me, but my wife for example is talk, average built for a Japanese woman, but did Kendo and Aikido, she is extremely quick, virtually No fat and is more of a difficult person to want to be fighting with, but again, it just depends on what fits you. What's good for one person may not be good for another.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

It is not a Martial Arts style, but the correct training method and a good teacher that make the difference.

Plus, you also need to be mentally prepared to get injured as well as willing to injure your opponent/s in a confrontation.

Standing, ground and weapons(traditional and modern) training are essential. You also need to be prepared to train 10% school vs 90% on your own.

Some of the moves might not be executable in confined areas, so you need to be adaptable

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Which martial arts would you recommend to someone wanting to learn a means of self-defense?

Don't know but I saw lots of karate, tae kwon do, judo etc. . go out of business back in my home state. On the other hand, any place teaching jui-jitsu or hardcore MMA stlye fighting are doing well.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Don't know but I saw lots of karate, tae kwon do, judo etc. . go out of business back in my home state. On the other hand, any place teaching jui-jitsu or hardcore MMA stlye fighting are doing well.

I took my kids to a few Dojos and to see what they like, my daughter is exceptionally and physically talented and she is a fast learner, strong build, we went to about 8 different dojos and out of all the styles out there, she liked Karate the best (I was hoping she would do Aikido or Jui-Jutsu, but she felt more comfortable with doing Seido Kaikan Karate for her it was the best choice. If you like what you do, you will always be good at it.

2 ( +4 / -3 )

LoL, hey bass- you're daughter might be the next "Rowdy" Ronda Rousey. (Female MMA Fighter)

1 ( +1 / -0 )

LoL, hey bass- you're daughter might be the next "Rowdy" Ronda Rousey. (Female MMA Fighter)

Lol, maybe! Most importing thing is, she's having fun, but at the same time, she is learning patience and how to be discipline. Great traits to learn in life.

2 ( +3 / -2 )

Not a martial art as such,but I'd say boxing.Though my daughter did karate for 2 years and I still get her to practice at home via a combo of boxing and karate as self defense.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

1st place - Track and field. Because running away if always a good first option, especially in Japan where your opponent is very unlikely to have a gun.

2nd place - The fine and ancient art of screaming "HELP!!" really, really loudly. Because this is Japan and in most places a police box will be within shouting distance or some nosey obaachan will call them if they aren't and your attacker knows this. Trained help will be there in minutes to firmly say, "Stop! Or we will be forced to say Stop again!!"

3rd place - Any of the "sports" martial arts, like karate or judo. Because they don't focus on killing your opponent.

4th place - Aikido. Because while it is the most gentle way to take someone down it also requires at least 100 hours of training before you can execute any of the techniques with confidence and skill in a high-stress situation.

5th place - Any of the "real" martial arts, like krav maga, kung fu or wing chun. Because they teach techniques that can and will kill, and some who's looking for self-defence classes is already afraid and may use them.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

3rd place - Any of the "sports" martial arts, like karate or judo. Because they don't focus on killing your opponent.

They don't teach it, actually, the majority of martial arts don't teach killing, but with Karate or Judo, if you're good, believe me, you most definitely can kill someone.

4th place - Aikido. Because while it is the most gentle way to take someone down it also requires at least 100 hours of training before you can execute any of the techniques with confidence and skill in a high-stress situation.

Same situation, I do Aikido for over 25 years and I'm very confident, I could, if I wanted to, kill someone. I don't believe in that, it's a gentle art, there is no such thing as a gentle martial art. Maybe when you practice it, but once you ultilize it and I have, it's anything but gentle.

5th place - Any of the "real" martial arts, like krav maga, kung fu or wing chun.

They're all real. Just depends on what you like, goal and what works for you.

Because they teach techniques that can and will kill, and some who's looking for self-defence classes is already afraid and may use them.

Again, that's pretty much any martial art and the person using it.

-7 ( +2 / -8 )

Kickboxing, if you are up for it. But it really depends who wants to learn and how he/she is willing to strain themselves.

If you want to stay safe and just learn some foundation like balance, distance, joint locks and falling, maybe Aikido.

Anyway, no martial art will turn any office warrior into Bruce Lee by means of some magical moves. The more time and energy any practitioner puts into it, the more results he will get.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Any serious martial artist can beat an untrained person in a duel. The problem with criminals, they usually attack in packs, no amount of martial arts can safe you from 3 guys with knives.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Reminds me of a story Mr. Holly told me way back. In university, he studied karate (this is in N. America), orange belt, when one day as he went into a convenience store he overheard some punks loitering around outside that they were gonna kick his a**. Sure enough, when he came out of the store, one of the thugs was in his face, threatening to pulverize him. He told the goon he agreed that it wouldn't be a fair fight. He said that in 1 minute he'd by lying in a pool of blood, but what fun would that be. The thug backed down and let him go. He said his karate instincts kicked in, as a last resort, but his sensei had always taught him that being physical is always a last resort; to use your brain before your muscles. That said, I think any martial art that trains the mind, as much as the body, would be a good choice.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Old MA saying.

" I don't worry about the thousand moves you know but snout the ones you practiced a thousand times. "

In MA like Tai Chi, etc you end up facing backwards as a reminder to do the form again.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

For women, Tai-Chikan, for when man touches you!

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

There are many styles and disciplines to choose from. No one martial art system is better than another. The only right martial art is the one you'll be happy continuing. In the end any martial art system can be used for self-defense. Every martial art style has value.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Martial arts during times when every day was a life or death situation is a very different discipline to what it is today. Shioda Gozo stated this perfectly when he said that the martial aspects of Aikido will die with him.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

There are many styles and disciplines to choose from. No one martial art system is better than another. The only right martial art is the one you'll be happy continuing. In the end any martial art system can be used for self-defense. Every martial art style has value.

Exactly! Well said, 100% agreed!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Nicely put divine intervention! Any martial art is about discipline and a system of meditation to integrate in ones every day life.This is the heart of it ....so to speak.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I myself am pretty partial to traditional Japanese martial arts as I love the culture and history. I would recommend Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu. I love it, but as with anything else, it's not for everyone. Eventually I would like to get formal training in Kenjutsu and Iaijutsu. If anyone has ever heard of Shinkendo, that is a good way to go. It is a gendai budo comprised of a few Koryu Bujutsu sword styles. There is a student of the founder of Shinkendo teaching in Tokyo. She stayed with him for a few months learning the style. The Honbu dojo is in Little Tokyo, Los Angeles, California.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

No one martial art system is better than another.

On the contrary, some are better. Mixed Martial Arts showed that. When MMA first started, the wrestlers/jiu jitsu players consistently won, time after time.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

If it is STRICTLY self-defense the person wants to learn, and especially if they are in Japan, I would say Aikido. If they want to learn a little bit of offensive as well if the case might warrant it, then I recommend karate or tae kwon do. The latter might be harder to find in Japan, while the former is probably the easiest martial art to take up, and the cheapest in terms of what you need to wear. Tae kwon do would be a lot easier to find elsewhere (meaning as easy to find in as karate in other places).

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

As a expert in martial arts and self defense I can say Combat Krav Maga is the best thing you can train because you learn how to protect yourself against Any situations and you get in excellent condition. I have been training 25 years karate and 17 years Krav Maga and kick boxing for a year, There is a big difference between sports, martial arts and self defense. 1-In sports there are rules, judges and only one opponent. In self defense we don't have that luxury. 2- in martial arts everybody train with people who is doing the same martial arts like karate guy never fights with judo guys as well as aikido guys don't train with Muay Thai guys On street you don't have any idea if the other guy is in trained or not and if trained in what? So you can get somebody from different disciplines and attacks that you are not familiar with. 3- each sport or art train for certain distances like judo train for very close distance, aikido further karate even further Krav Maga can handle any distance 4-each sport or art has it is own weakness such as box has no kicking techniques therefore you loose 50% of your body ability, teakwando on the other hand has no punching just kicks, aikido is good against swords but these days haven't seen anybody walking with swords around and there is no defense against kicks, Judo is good in throwing techniques but against people with knife or swinging punches not really useful also there are no punches or kicks in it, Krav Maga has no rules and anything works kicking punching throwing ground techniques. 5- most sports or arts train people on focusing on one person such as boxing, karate, judo on the street you may face few attackers and focusing on one may get you killed 6- sports usually don't have defense against weapons such as knifes baseball bats and guns, even if they have techniques it is very theoretical and not practical. Krav naga has practical answers. 7- most arts and sports are old school means they don't update them selfs such as Aikido. Life around us changing rapidly and if you want to survive you need to update yourself. Nobody walk around with kimonos anymore clothes are changing therefore using judo techniques are difficult as they teach you to grab the opponents kimono or sleeve to throw him if he is wearing t shirt like most people there are no sleeves also clothe will get rip before you can throw him. Aikido was invented to fight the samurais with swords since they don't exist anymore it is not relevant anymore today's weapons are not swords and shuhei kens but it is hand guns knifes and broken bottles so let's get real and leave the last samurai fantasies. If you want to survive the streets learn Israeli combat krav maga

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

avimazalto:

There is quite a bit of wrong/misleading information in your post. I´ll just pick two bits that stand out:

" in martial arts everybody train with people who is doing the same martial arts like karate guy never fights with judo guys as well as aikido guys don't train with Muay Thai guys "

Actually, no. There are plenty of friendly mixed matches out there, because people are naturally curious. (And e.g. the competitions between Taikiken and Kyokushin Karate have a really long tradition.) Google for it. And of course, with the invention of MMA, this has become mainstream. Also, there are some martial arts that were deliberately created as an amalgam of different fighting types; obvious examples are Shorinji Kempo, Daido Juku, Shooto, Yoseikan Budo, or Nihon Kempo.

" Aikido was invented to fight the samurais with swords since they don't exist anymore " It was absolutely not. When Ueshiba, Hira, and Morita created their versions of Aikido, the samurais had been gone for a long time. Aikido in all its versions is a modern martial art (gendai budo).

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

On the contrary, some are better.

What is better to you, may NOT be for someone else. That is your personal opinion.

Mixed Martial Arts showed that. When MMA first started, the wrestlers/jiu jitsu players consistently won, time after time.

Coming from a family that does serious styles of martial arts, perhaps in a ring you can win and to a small point you are not entirely incorrect, however, I have personally seen someone getting knocked to the ground that was a Jiu Jitsuist by a Karate expert (Kyokushin) again, some people don't have the physical strength of someone that does either MMA, wrestling or Jiu Jitsu, some people have to rely on speed and agility and I have seen enough fights to honestly say it depends on who that person is, if you can hit the person, get them in a painful hand or wrist lock, you can not only do damage, but you can quickly take the fight out of anyone. I am not saying one art is better than the other, because I think it just depends. As an Aikidoist, I wouldn't be afraid of going toe to toe with either of the three mentioned and I'm very confident and the reason for that is because of MY personal background in training various arts, watching, learning the pros and cons, the weak points and more importantly, what the others would try and do. Am I sure of the outcome, of course not, but either way with me at least, it would be a challenge for the individual. But very few people know that I do martial arts, I just don't talk about it and when I do, I just usually don't mention it, it's something very personal to me and I don't believe I need to post pictures of me on Facebook or Instagram. But again, I speak for myself and growing up half of my life in Los Angeles, it is a Mecca for Martial Artists, if you pickup the Yellow pages, you'll have more than 8 pages of dojos and various styles from the celebrity to the gang banger, it's just a way of life for us and I have the utmost respect for all of them and I like them all, I think all the arts are beautiful. I'm thinking about going to the World United Martial arts Convention this year in London. Great place to meet people, learn and great opportunity to grow and become a better martial artist.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

If that were the case, then we wouldn't have muggings, theft, murder, rape. All of these could be avoided.

All of those things are predictable, to an extent. Most rapes, murders, thefts, and muggings don't happen in broad daylight, or in well-to-do neighborhoods, for example.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Maybe being a condescending know-it-all is a potential martial art?

Demonstrated here, it seems great for self defense. Avoiding opinionated self absorbed stalkers eliminates the need for traditions of combat practices since it's a waste of time. Maybe it's the most effective martial art of all?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Jeet Kune Do (JKD). Every and any fighting stlye is useful if it's effective. Why not fight in a way which combines judo, karate, kung fu, wrestling, boxing, etc., etc.?

I suppose if I'm a girl and I had to go with only one fighting style I would go with kung fu. It would hopefully enable the victim of an attack to stun your attacker in a quick and sharp manner while hopefully giving the victim a chance to run like hell.

But they're all good depending on who your attacker is and which fighting style you are trying to defend yourself against. I've studied and practiced judo, karate (not kung fu) and wrestling. While being the type who prefers to walk away from a fight, even the ones I'm sure I'd win, the few instances where I've had to stand up for myself I'm quite comfortable combining what I've learned. When I have been forced to fight, I like to land a couple of punches, then wrestle combined with judo choke holds, lock up the attackers head and then treat it like my very own punching bag. I've had attackers run from me in a state of panic after a little while of this, which is fine by me because I never want to fight in the first place. One thing I've learned through sparring is that anybody (even the best) can be beaten on the best of days, so don't ever be too full of yourself. Run, walk away or avoid are always the best options to save your skin.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I presume by "Martial Arts," the article refers to "Budo." As far as I understand it, Budo has nothing to do with offence or defence.

The Kanji used are "Bu," a combination of "stop" and "weapon," and "do," meaning "the way," as in "way of life."

Thus Budo is the philosophy of no fighting.

It is not beating someone to pulp or lashing out with hands and feet to render a gang of knife wielding fiends senseless.

A person skilled in Budo just stops the fight.

It is much more spiritual than physical.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

presume by "Martial Arts," the article refers to "Budo."

Martial arts is 格闘技 (kakutougi)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

To borrow from an aikido teacher, "If you want self-defense, get an uzi."

Which I bring up to mean when people ask, "Which is the best martial art for self-defense?" what they really mean is, "Which is the best martial art for self-defense in addition to all these other qualities I find valuable but will leave unspoken." These unspoken qualities can be things like encouraging physical fitness, developing personal self-control, looking cool to bystanders, an ability to take down a single opponent in a ring where the fight follows a particular set of rules, etc. And my experience from seeing Internet arguments about martial arts is that even when we say we're focusing on self-defense, we're really secretly focusing on the unspoken qualities.

There are a thousand different ways to defend yourself, and the "best" one is the one that matches who you are and is appropriate to the situations you will find yourself in. That's going to be radically different from person to person. Personally I found aikido very effective, not for dealing with fights (because I'm not the sort of person who gets attacked in the first place), but for re-thinking how I imagine conflict in the first place. But that doesn't meet everyone else's needs, and I've got better things to do than argue against someone about things that are going to be different for them because they aren't me.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

On the contrary, some are better.

That is your personal opinion.

No it's not. It's the fact that when they threw guys in the ring and let them fight however they wanted, the wrestlers and jiu jitsu guys were the winners. It's not my opinion that they won, it's fact that they won.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Strangerland.

The ring is the ring and mot the street or any other environment where you might need"Self Defense" skills.

Remember the topic is Self Defense and not Sports/Hobby fighting., very different skills and mental mindsets needed for each.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

No, but there's no reason why the same thing wouldn't happen in a street fight. Unless one person does the right thing and runs away.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Strangerland.

Did they let them wear everyday clothing, threw In Knifes, Bats, etc. Those are the norm for street fighting. And you don't want to take it to the ground because his friends will stomp the heck out of you.

Situational awareness is best, running is second.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

threw In Knifes, Bats, etc. Those are the norm for street fighting.

Not in any street fights I've ever seen.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

You might have seen some brawls.

From personal experience they are common, even had firearms pointed at me. That is why I said above you need to be trained in traditional and modern weapons under a good instructor.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

From personal experience they are common

Again, I've never seen it, and I've seen a lot of street fights (and been in a few).

even had firearms pointed at me. No martial art is going to win against a firearm.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Again wrong, it depends. Can't say more but some MA really go into hardcore stufg once you are accepted as a Deshi or Inner Door Student.

Plus, I also learned military CQC during my service.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

No it's not.

Of course it is your opinion. You can say No, as much as you like, but what works for you may not work for someone else or what you may be good at, another person may be horrible at, you also have to factor in speed, agility and strength, size, these are all contributing factors and and depending on the art or how you utilize can or cannot be lethal.

It's the fact that when they threw guys in the ring and let them fight however they wanted, the wrestlers and jiu jitsu guys were the winners. It's not my opinion that they won, it's fact that they won.

True, but aim not talking about the ring. My father was a boxer and I can tell you, when a jab or an uppercut meets your chin, it's goodnight, again, it depends on the person. I have seen enough fights and been in few and seen a lot from so many styles and I seriously respect them all and don't look down on any of them. I have my preference and I wouldn't be afraid to go up against anyone and I think attitude plays a lot in if the person is assaulted as to what or how the outcome would be.

I presume by "Martial Arts," the article refers to "Budo." As far as I understand it, Budo has nothing to do with offence or defence.

True, but in reality when faced with dire situation and someone is in your face, your instincts will kick in your body just reacts. Sorry there is no such thing as a peaceful martial art, all of them teach self-defense and when it is in use, it is not gentle towards the attacker, nor should it be.

The Kanji used are "Bu," a combination of "stop" and "weapon," and "do," meaning "the way," as in "way of life."

Thus Budo is the philosophy of no fighting.

Someone approaches me or my family physically assaults them and I should do nothing? Not a chance!

It is not beating someone to pulp or lashing out with hands and feet to render a gang of knife wielding fiends senseless.

If a person is wielding a knife and tries anything, sadly, he might just be getting a pulp beating, if I am cornered or blocked, then anything goes.

A person skilled in Budo just stops the fight.

On your side, YES. But the assailant might not share that same POV.

It is much more spiritual than physical.

Should be, but life isn't always peaceful.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Of course it is your opinion.

Except that it's not. It's fact that the jiu jitsu players and wrestlers won pretty much every time.

True, but aim not talking about the ring. My father was a boxer and I can tell you, when a jab or an uppercut meets your chin, it's goodnight

Same is true when boxers/stand up fighters meet with wrestlers and jiu jitsu players in the ring. Pretty much impossible to knock someone out when you're on your back though. And boxers don't know how to defend against take downs.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I think this thread is heading in a strange direction. You argue you-tube style "my martial art is better than yours" till the end of time, but is there really a point to it? I am doing Aikido and Shotokan Karate myself, and I think the combination is great, but I am going around telling everybody that that is the perfect solution. It just works for me. I think every martial art has some merit, and practising something is always better than doing nothing. The best martial art to do is the one that you like and stick with and practise regularly. Somehow I don´t see the typical office warrior to go to an MMA gym every day and slug it out... so I think that ends that thread.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Except that it's not. It's fact that the jiu jitsu players and wrestlers won pretty much every time.

Well, then we are both right, you have seen the outcome Jiu Jutsu and wrestlers and I saw other various arts prevail. So it just depends.

Same is true when boxers/stand up fighters meet with wrestlers and jiu jitsu players in the ring.

As a person that has seen both, I can tell you for a fact, it doesn't always end up that way. I have seen wrestlers getting a serious beat down from a boxer, once you get punched and I mean, seriously punched, it's pretty much over.

Pretty much impossible to knock someone out when you're on your back though.

True, but boxers usually never allow someone to get that close and even if they do, stil the wrestler could be in danger of getting blasted.

And boxers don't know how to defend against take downs.

Then I am afraid you really don't understand the first thing about street fighting.

I think this thread is heading in a strange direction. You argue you-tube style "my martial art is better than yours" till the end of time, but is there really a point to it? I am doing Aikido and Shotokan Karate myself, and I think the combination is great, but I am going around telling everybody that that is the perfect solution. It just works for me.

And that's my exact point, if it works for you, that's great. You have the balance, the kicks, blocks and your u know how to fall, together they make a very interesting and lethal combination.

I think every martial art has some merit, and practising something is always better than doing nothing. The best martial art to do is the one that you like and stick with and practise regularly. Somehow I don´t see the typical office warrior to go to an MMA gym every day and slug it out... so I think that ends that thread.

True and not everyone can do MMA or can handle the training and by the way, MMA fighters are still human and any human, if you know how can be injured. When I was a struggling college student, I worked a few clubs twice a week doing security and there were fights literally every week and all the security had to know or be skilled in self-defense. That was their requirement for employment. Met a lot of people from all kinds of backgrounds and they were all great fighters and proficient in their art. Great men and women, highly professional and no one ever had an ego problem, everyone know what their role was and did their job to the best degree.

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You speak a lot of words. I've simply pointed out the facts. There's a big difference.

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You speak a lot of words. I've simply pointed out the facts. There's a big difference.

Not just you. We all spoke facts, all valid and to the point.

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StrangerlandJun. 14, 2015 - 08:29PM JST Except that it's not. It's fact that the jiu jitsu players and wrestlers won pretty much every time.

I've heard this argument before, and the bottom line is that the rules and environment in MMA strongly bias the results of the tournament in favour of some martial arts.

The closed environment of the ring favours martial artists who want to close and clinch, while the prohibition against disabling or strikes that cause serious harm means that the person closing just has to put up with a couple of strikes (which are NOT by the rules allowed to disable or cause serious harm), so they tend to win.

It doesn't mean that jiu jitsu or wrestling are better martial arts, just that they're better in that particular artificial environment. Why don't you try those jiu jitsu techniques in a kung fu pole garden and see how kung fu quickly becomes the "best" martial art?

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All of them. Combined. No need to be black belt unless you are competing. Anything above 2nd or 3rd levels (speaking generally due to different ranking systems) is more than enough to protect yourself.

Why? The first thing they should teach you is to stay out of fights. Avoid trouble like the plague. Be VERY aware of your surrounding at all times. This also means that most people who start fights really don't know how to fight, or they would have had the same philosophy instilled in them. A good comparison would be even though gangsters have guns, they really have no skill as they are not disciplined enough to practice.

I say combined because as you get older, you will no longer be able to use as much power and agility you once had and will then be able to fall back on other training and create your own combinations of what works for you.

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I've heard this argument before, and the bottom line is that the rules and environment in MMA strongly bias the results of the tournament in favour of some martial arts.

The closed environment of the ring favours martial artists who want to close and clinch, while the prohibition against disabling or strikes that cause serious harm means that the person closing just has to put up with a couple of strikes (which are NOT by the rules allowed to disable or cause serious harm), so they tend to win.

It doesn't mean that jiu jitsu or wrestling are better martial arts, just that they're better in that particular artificial environment. Why don't you try those jiu jitsu techniques in a kung fu pole garden and see how kung fu quickly becomes the "best" martial art?

All of them. Combined. No need to be black belt unless you are competing. Anything above 2nd or 3rd levels (speaking generally due to different ranking systems) is more than enough to protect yourself.

Why? The first thing they should teach you is to stay out of fights. Avoid trouble like the plague. Be VERY aware of your surrounding at all times. This also means that most people who start fights really don't know how to fight, or they would have had the same philosophy instilled in them. A good comparison would be even though gangsters have guns, they really have no skill as they are not disciplined enough to practice.

Exactly. I have seen a few of those scenarios play out.

I say combined because as you get older, you will no longer be able to use as much power and agility you once had and will then be able to fall back on other training and create your own combinations of what works for you.

Both of you are correct. 100% agree on all points

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Artiste at large:

" All of them. Combined. No need to be black belt unless you are competing. Anything above 2nd or 3rd levels (speaking generally due to different ranking systems) is more than enough to protect yourself. "

Disagree, disagree, and disagree. If you want to learn everything, you learn nothing. Better choose a couple and train those regularly.

About "black belt", there is no magic attached to that. "Black belt" (1st dan) simply means you have learned an art, it does not mean you are good at it. Better stay at it and become good.

And now, "anything" is NOT "more than enough" to protect yourself. Any physical conflagration can be dangerous, and no martial art is "more then enough" to be safe. All of them help, of course, but there is never a guarantee. It is simply a matter of degree... the better you are at it, the better your chances to protect yourself.

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BertieWooster, Budo, huh? So that's what's I've been doing all these years. I honestly did not know this.

I have had far more luck doing Budo than actually fighting, yet I have trained in many marital arts.

Sincere thank you. I have learned something new today.

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It's not the dog in the fight, but the fight in the dog...I practice shotokan karate, judo and boxing, I have had excellent instructors. But most of all, like someone said earlier, the best self-defence is to avoid it all together...which I use.

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I've studied and practice Tae Kwan Do, Judo, and Aikido. Been in two violent, random street confrontations where fists, not weapons, were in play. In both cases I could not get away, but in both cases, because of my training, I did not feel in danger of great bodily harm - which is a huge plus, because you can think. This might be the single greatest advantage. It's likely any form of martial art, in which you've seriously trained, will grant this.

But here's something none of my instructors ever told me: because I was thinking while these events took place, I found I could not bring myself to inflict harm on my attackers. One was a drunk, the other was just an idiot - both were fit and strong. Judo and Aikido allowed me to outmaneuver them, and eventually the situations defused, but I knew if I clocked these guys, they would be seriously harmed - adults beating on one another leads to injury. This would be different if serious bodily harm was in the offing, of course.

Your brain is your best defensive weapon. Use it.

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No amount of martial arts can safe you from 3 guys with knives.

Or even one, who knows how to use it. (Unless, you have a knife and know how to use it too) See here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0jwpwzGpGQ

If fact, scratch that. Give a red magic marker with an exposed top to a 10 year-old, and try to see if you can grab the kid, or take the pen away, without getting less than two red marks on your hand or arms. I've never seen it done.

An person over the age of 13 armed with a knife who intends to use it can only be fled from, kept at bay with a larger weapon, or a gun.

The best option is flee. Self-defense is about defending yourself. Here is how to do it:

Avoid dangerous people and dangerous places.

Can be a cramp on your life(style), but there it is. Hang out near/with young men, or in bars, and there you go. Young men are prone to violence. Drunk people can be violent. Young drunk men are violent.

Dangerous parts of town are, well, dangerous. Avoid them.

Do not defend your property.

Sure, its hard to let some jerk take your bag, or stand by and watch three kids hot-wire your car, but there you go. We're talking self-defense. Not defense of property.

Respond immediately and escape.

If you have 1 and 2 firmly down, than any violence that finds you is, by definition, unavoidable.

Knowing this, when you find yourself confronted with violence, you can commit to respond with violence.

The core of self-defense is simple: Do whatever you can to avoid a physical confrontation, but the moment avoidance fails, attack explosively for the purposes of escape.

Don't police others. Don't to mete out justice. Don't teach a bully a lesson. Self-defense means Get away you and those with away from the danger.

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I have participated in so many different types of martial arts. I have done Brazillian jiu jitsu, tai kwon do, kung fu, karate, krav maga and, even, a little bit of Brazillian capoeira. I don't consider myself a professional, but I just enjoy switching between them all and learning a little bit here and there. My favorite self defense forms, though, are krav maga and karate. Both teach you different parts about what you need to defend yourself and are probably the most useful. http://www.master-sh-yu.com

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I’ve been training since I was 2003 and I know jeet kune do Brazilian jujitsu Japanese jujitsu kickboxing boxing and muay tai and I’ve been training for almost 16 years and I’m 19 and honestly this is what I think you should know about street fighting or in a octagon you need to know how to strike takedowns on the ground tactics and to counter a strike or a takedown or getting out of a hold so if you don’t know how to do that my best advice is to join a martial art that teaches you how to know a little bit of everything in 6 months to a year versus training 15 years and next month I’ll have 16 years of experience and a black belt in Brazilian jujitsu and Japanese jujitsu and next month I’ll be trying to get my 2 degree black belts and honestly if you’re not able to fight and you’re dreams are going into the ufc well let me tell you this if you haven’t trained for at least 7-10 years of practicing mixed martial arts then you’re dreams are not going to happen unless you’re 16 to 20 years old because I’m 19 and I’m only doing amateur fights in the octagon my record is 21-0-0 and when I get to 25 wins my coach said I could have a shot of going into the ufc but if this isn’t what you’re looking for and only wanting to know what to do in a street fight well there’s no martial arts that is going to teach you everything your gonna need to train at different gyms I’d recommend muay tai and Brazilian jujitsu and boxing because you’ll know a lot more about how to get someone on the ground and also knowing how to throw a punch a bit of elbows and legs and knees and someone with my experience I know what to do versus someone that trying to take on me with my experience in mixed martial arts versus someone that doesn’t of course someone would lose if they didn’t know anything about mixed martial arts and came up to me started picking a fight like the only people that might stand a chance is a bodybuilder like not the fake ones that are steroid and jucied up I’m talking about someone that trains naturally they might have a chance but they wouldn’t know what to do when I take them to the ground and have them in a triangle choke or a arm bar because they don’t know how to fight so what I’m saying is it’s like you versing a master and you’re the beginner in the class you wouldn’t win it’s that simple in less you have more experience than me in my mixed martial arts that I’ve trained pretty much my whole life

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