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Why do English-speaking people write RIP when they read about someone's death? Is it a religious or cultural tradition?

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The full “Rest in Peace” is best but “RIP” is acceptable (from a smaller device?) IF respectfully followed by a comma AND the decedent’s name to ‘personalize’ it as a genuine sentiment.

It’s also respectful to acknowledge any known grieving family & friends with a simple “Condolences for your loss.”

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I sometimes winder about that. I post it a lot, too. If you think about it from a religious point of view, the deceased person is in heaven enjoying eternal life, hardly resting. If you think about it from a non-religious perspective, the person has ceased to exist and buried or cremated; hardly resting.

Does anyone know if there are similar expressions in Japanese or other languages?

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From the Latin, requiescat in pace. So it's not really English but early Christian.

The original religious use would have related to theological aspects of the afterlife. Protestant churches and governments balanced the traditional with the vernacular (so England popularly retained a patron saint, St. George, even after switching away from Catholicism). The use of the initials was a nod to the Latin tradition but a match for the English.

Dying was an extremely grim and painful business before modern medicine. Most people would have suffered more than we will, for some time before dying. The end of this suffering may be recognised in the popular vernacular adoption. It also offers a formalised way to pay your respects at a difficult time, even if you did not like the person who has passed, as it is regarded as impolite to speak ill of the dead.

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Yes, it’s of course from Latin language and nowadays used in its English translation. And personally I would even say, that the abbreviation better should be written with the dots, so that there is less misunderstanding, for example with the similar verb, if it was written in capitals. R.I.P.

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snowymountainhellToday  08:02 am JST

The full “Rest in Peace” is best but “RIP” is acceptable (from a smaller device?) IF respectfully followed by a comma AND the decedent’s name to ‘personalize’ it as a genuine sentiment.

It’s also respectful to acknowledge any known grieving family & friends with a simple “Condolences for your loss.”

The RIP brigade always appear when a death is reported, particularly if the deceased is a child or the circumstances are especially sad. In every case the deceased person is not known to the RIPers who then go on to send condolences to family and friends they don't know and have never met. Even more stupid is writing this nonsense on a comments section like this one where the affected people can't/won't even read it! Why do they do this? Attention seeking or does it make them feel better in some way.

To then go on to discuss whether or not RIP needs to be written in full or not depending on the device being used (!), "respectfully" followed by a comma and the decedent's name "to ‘personalize’ it as a genuine sentiment." is beyond ludicrous.

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From early Christian rites but now a cultural thing

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“*God Bless **You**” then, @HarryGatto 10:10am **for Your clarity & opinion. (It’s exactly what editors wanted when they designed Today’s “Have Your Say”). - MY clarity is to show ‘respect’ to the decedents and their survivors before *engaging in any commentary about a topic.

One poster here today @8:57am commented:

“It also offers a formalised way to pay your respects at a difficult time, even if you did not like the person who has passed, as it is regarded as impolite to speak ill of the dead.” -

… and I agree with that ‘sentiment’.

Another one regarding ‘respect toward others’ in an appropriate format, once wrote:

- “Quite so. Good taste, good manners and just knowing how to conduct oneself is now a lost art.” -

Acknowledged. Some ‘here’ have no respect toward others, just want to control every interaction and being cordial, may in fact, now be “a lost art”. - “Peace to You”

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Can NOW see a 2nd question has been added after 8am: “Is it a religious or cultural tradition?

We may ask a similar question of many Asian police, pausing in ‘a moment of silence’ at the deceased’s body, bowing their heads with the palms together in ‘a gesture of reverence”, or ‘prayer’, regardless of who the victim was or any familiarity with them. It may not necessarily signify any specific ‘religious’ belief or ‘superstition’. It may strictly be a respectful form of acknowledgement for loss of any life.

Perhaps those that cant’ accept other people cultural intricacies, or call them, “stupid” and “nonsense”, are probably missing something very deep from within themselves ?

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Rest In Peace, until resurrected into everlasting life,

in the time of Jesus' return.

That is what Christians believe.

It's also a way to show respect for a person who has passed,

and a way to let others who didn't know, that they have passed.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

When someone sneeze, western people say 'God Bless You'. You've got to know the real story behind it, you will freak out!

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If it's someone good, then I'd say RIP. If it's someone who was plain nasty and evil, I'd say BIH.

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Yes, the acronym, abbreviation is a prayer associated with Catholic funeral service.

Essential to Catholic view on purgatory.

The prayer is integral part of the Latin “Requiem” Mass. Is set to a melodic refrain.

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them. May they rest in peace. Amen

Requiem aeternam dona eis Domine; et lux perpetua luceat eis. Requiescant in pace. Amen.

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I always thought it meant Registered In Paradise.

I guess my mom lied to me.

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Maybe we can make a new one such as RFT, respite from taxes.

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I do not use the term which is Christain based and that after death, the being is still present in heaven and eternal life or condemned to eternal hell. Their souls can be interfered with like people believe in ghosts. Some even believe the dead can be brought back to this life like a zombie.

I do not believe in any of that. 

If I'm connected or related to the deceased I will remember who they were, what they did, and what they meant to me.

During this Obon, we think about our ancestors. That is a good point.

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Agreed @zichi 5:18pm,To each their own” customs, etc. -

Still, no offense intended but ‘just curious’. Any story behind choice of such an iconic piece of art. The Salvator Mundi, associated by many with John 8:12: “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” ?

Like writing “Rest in Peace” regarding decedents, I, for one, think it such an icon may influence how some readers may regard someone. - That’s just one reader’s perspective.

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snowymountainhell

Still, no offense intended but ‘just curious’. Any story behind choice of such an iconic piece of art. The Salvator Mundi, associated by many with John 8:12: “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” ?

I can admire and respect art for what is whether Buddhist, Christain, Islamic, Pagan, Druids. There are many great works of art across all religions. da Vinci's Last Supper. Michael Angelo's Sistine Chapel. Visited the Vatican numerous times.

da Vinci's Salvator Mundi is truly an outstanding painting and also the world's most expensive one. I use it for my avatar so its good fortunes may shine down on your life and bring you wealth.

I prayer that answers your question.

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Thanks @zichi 6:15p for the rapid response, wishes for good future, et al. Sums up a lot.

“I use it for my avatar so its good fortunes may shine down on your life and bring you wealth. I prayer that answers your question.

Peace to All. -
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snowymountainhellToday  12:15 pm JST

“*God Bless **You***” then*, @HarryGatto 10:10am **for Your clarity & opinion. (It’s exactly what editors wanted when they designed Today’s “Have Your Say”). - MY clarity is to show ‘respect’ to the decedents and their survivors before *engaging in any commentary about a topic.

Thank you. Seems you are not using a "smaller device".

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Rest in peace, yes of course it springs from a particular religious and cultural tradition with which English is deeply imbued with. It’s use as others have said is an expression of respect and good manners. Both of which are part of the cement that glues a civil society together.

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i have always thought that the term RIP is an affectionate remembrance to a person that has had an inspirational consequence on ones life above the religious connotation, a respectful nod to that persons passing.

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It may have religious roots, but is definitely now colloquial slang. It is the least formal, least personal condolence you could possibly offer.

Like if you finish a juice box really quick you might say “RIP juice box.”

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Something good to say? I just wish for that soul to rest in peace. I don't think it's my culture and definitely not a religion thing for me, since I'm a 100% against any of them.

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0What do the Japanese say to someone that just lost a friend or family member, and translate it?

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What do the Japanese say to someone that just lost a friend or family member,

The expression "goshuushou-sama desu" is what I remember. But it's directed at the dead person's family and not referring to the deceased (similar to "my condolences").

But it brings back funny memories of an African comedian who used to appear on Japanese TV (perhaps he still does). He described his first attendance at a funeral in Japan, and he thought the people in line before him were saying "gochiso-sama deshita". And he noticed they were picking something up and he thought they were eating it. So he followed suit. (They were picking up incense and holding to their foreheads - but he couldn't see.) My wife tells me that people still laugh at his story.

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