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Why do Asian pop stars have a hard time succeeding in the U.S. market?

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Because they get drunk and take their clothes off then scream like little girls in a park in the middle of the night. Then afterwards the effectively do 'seppuku' to their own career.

This is not cool in the west.

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Racism & jealously pure & simple.

The west just can’t compete with Asia.

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Because their songs are not creative enough or any creative appeal. It sounds the same and looks the same. The melody is boring and lacks appeal. The Engrish Lyrics are not really emotional pr appealing. Nowadays, I am really picky in purcahsing CD's. Most artists of today sounds like garbage. I don't buy lip synching artists. Or artists who do not write their own songs. Alot of American Artists are more terrible than Japanese Pop Artists. Japanese Pop artists look to child like. And fashion is a bit different. High School Girl's wearing high school uniform ( Skirt ) pop artists are not appealing in America. School Uniforms are not appealing in America. Only Britney Spears pulled it off with a high school uniform. But that was just a parody on a Private School. English (not Engrish), Creative Appeal and lyrics are very important nowadays.

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Racism and social perception definitely has something to do with it. Also, whereas todays's Western artists are perceived to be original (although not in reality), Asian (Japanese) artists are even more blatant in terms of appearing to be the outcome of pure-and-simple marketing.

The language barrier and a social perception gap also has something to do with it. Rap (or whatever is popular in a country at a particular point in time) is usually a reflection of what is happening in wider society. It is pretty difficult to look at another country from the other side of the world and come up with songs that people in that country feel are relevant to that point in time. You also have the issue of music (as an art form) being on the way out. Massively successful bands in the old day (as opposed to modern rap groups) used to have a high level of musical talent. The Rolling Stones, Queen, even Abba (god forbid). This talent seemed to transcend national borders. These days, however, by and large rap is crxp (to put it bluntly).

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Maybe our market's just saturated with a bunch of no-talents. There are a few that can actually sing, but they're in the minority. Singing in English is important because we're not allowed to be bi-lingual. I think that's the key - must sing in English. We don't speak Japanese here. (Except those who actually came from Japan.)

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They can't sing well enough to make a dent.

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Asia pop stars are engineered more than the west. Western stars are engineered, but there is still an amount of choice, so the REALLY popular ones are popular because their is a natural demand for their music. Acts in asia are only popular because they are the acts pushed on the public the most by the asia-pop factories. There is no room for originality. Garage bands can become hugely popular in the west, but rarely have they done so in Asia.

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Because the quite little tactics like the neko nya or nasal harmony doesn't sell. Half naked 11 year olds would get prosecuted, repetitious boy bands that all look the same would get boring, and questionable talent agencies would get hauled into court.

In a nut shell that sums up japanese pop groups.

A very very talented musician friend of mine explained it to me this way. In america you have so many influences, blues, jazz, big band, etc. We japanese only have einka as our roots everything else is imported. Its not that we cant sound or act like that its that its out of place for us. I know alot of japanese musicians and singers that can sing perfect English, play any composition, but its always a xerox of something else.

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I agree with DXXJP. American has never been more open to Asian media than now. The US even has characters on primetime TV that only speak in Japanese and Korean (Heroes and Lost) Between that and the appeal of anime and movies like the Last Samurai and Memoirs of a Geisha, I find it hard to believe that America is too racist to accept Japanese music.

It's just a question of musically what sells in Asia vs. what sells in the US.

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asian popstars have the whole "idol" mould whereby music is just one part of the package that they sell. this doesn't really fly in the west, in fact its rather frowned on for an artist to work in multiple fields. so in asia a signer can hope to capitalise when they come to be seen as an idol whereas in the west the have to stand up as a singer alone.

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What would distinguish an Asian pop star in the US? I don't think the problem is racism, just that there's no difference between what j-pop/k-pop stars offer and what's already on offer in the US. Market saturation, if you will.

But really, there's not exactly a long track record of Asian artists trying to make it in the US. Only a few I can think of, and none of them unique musical talents. Some Japanese groups have done well as 'cult' artists, though - Shonen Knife has toured the US, as has Guitar Wolf and Thee Michelle Gun Elephant.

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Speak English! It's not just Asian artists, any foreign language pop can't break in. There's a separate market for Spanish-language stuff, but it rarely if ever breaks through to the mainstream. I think the last foreign-language song to be a hit in the U.S. was "99 Luftballoons".

Now, BoA from South Korea seems to have made a little inroad with her dance hit.

And The Pillows have found a small cult audience among anime nerds (Imagine my surprise in Kyoto a few years ago, I went to see them thinking they were these huge rock stars.. and they were playing in a tiny club).

The only people in America who know Tomoyasu Hotei or Akira Takasaki are other guitar players.

Miwa from "Dreams Come True" speaks English pretty fluently, I'm surprised they never tried to release singles over here. They've recorded here, but haven't really tried to crack the market.

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Pawatan, Telecasterplayer I think you'd be surprised. I started promoting a local rock band in the states and through radio research, found that lots of smaller college radio stations have programs devoted to Asian or even just Japanese music. Many local Tokyo rock bands have done small tours in the US.

I think the whole J-Pop sound in general has a big cult following, but it's only the slightly alternative sounds that have breakthrough success (in addition to those mentioned above, the Boredoms, Pizzicato 5, Cibo Matto, and 5,6,7,8's) I always thought UA would do well overseas too.

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for the most part its about a lack of talent

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not racism, simple lack of talent and originality.

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If you look at the headline, you'll find it's addressed only to Asian pop stars. I'm one but I can't believe everyone else answering this question is.

Does Numa Numa count as a foreign hit?

J-pop and similar styles are just crap. Pure, unadulterated crap. That's why nobody outside of Asia wants to listen to it. Get rid of the boy bands and bring in some people with talent. People who can write a song and possibly even play an instrument.

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Try expanding beyond the "safe" (IE: 30-second Anime j-pop bumps) niche market.

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The same reason French, Italian, German, Spanish, Brazilian, Mexican, etc, are not popular. People want to listen to music with lyrics that they can understand and identify with. That's why J-pop is #1 in Japan.

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i have to say that very few "pop stars" from asian succeed in presenting a complete package. i've heard quite a few with good or talented voices, but the music is awful, or the lyrics are ridiculous or contain dated slang and childish phrases (utada hikaru... "flavor of love" comes to mind). many of my japanese friends buy music solely because of the image or photos on the cd cover... i'm afraid it takes more than that to make it in the u.s. (although pop music in the u.s. is not much better in my humble opinion). try playing real instruments for a change... there seems to be no shortage of $$ in the japanese pop industry, you think they might invest some of it in accomplished english or american writers.

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Japan! The greatest imitators in the world. Though their imitation of Hip-Hop is insulting. How can they import that style into their J-pop, and call it their own without the proper understanding of its lyrical and rhythmic roots. All this throwing up gang signs and FUBU and Timberlakes...and talking about the "hood". Like that even applies in Japan.

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The markets follow different tastes.

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they all have squeaky voices

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Oh yeah! Kelly Clarkson is soo awesome! She is so original!

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The fact that there is not even a Japanese Idol show (even communist China has some) shows 1 there isnt a big pool of talent, 2 the record/tv industry are afraid of letting the people decide who should be "idols" Angela Aki should make a push in the US market.

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The entire way of how the local entertainement business chose and manage "tarento", looks like Fastfood, standarized and pre-cooked Stars.

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The problem isn't with rasicm, its with a true lack of talent. There are maybe only 3-4 singers in Japan who truly can sing. The rest of them are just puppets. They are chosen by only their looks and marketing value to sing songs written by other people. The songs are also made so everybody will be able to sing them, generating Karaoke revenues. Very sad... But it will never change because all of the Sheep keep following the trends and popularity contests in Japan. Bottom line, 90% of Japanese pop stars Suck.

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I enjoy some j-pop and would love to see some of the acts over here in North America. Or even a j-pop section at HMV would be nice. I am a big music fan but was just really never exposed to j-pop/rock because it is so hard to find here. I usually end up with a backpack of cd/dvd's every trip to Japan. Now I listen every day.

Not sure why people think you need talent to be in music? If this was true I would have stopped playing guitar years ago!

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J-pop is made with canned music and simpleton lyrics to enhance the enjoyability of mutilating it at karaoke boxes. When ws the last time the MUSIC stood out in a j-pop song you heard? Never, right? I can think of few things worse than J-pop, well, ok, C-pop, then K-pop, then T-pop. Bad, bad - all bad! I knew it was a farce when I saw Guitar wolf on TV and they started with "よろしくおねがいします". I died a little that day.

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There will be cult followings ala 5-6-7-8's But poorly redone versions of old songs sung in poor english will not a hit make I am afraid....

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Yes, true lack of talent.

Mechanical puppets

On a background of asian kitsch

And hysterical characters.

I even met one (I will spare her having her name written out publicly here) who thought that being a J-pop singer is something that she had accomplished well because she had studied music in daigaku...

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As was touched on earlier, in countries like Japan, the "Idol" experience is much more than music. It's TV, fashion and the like, a whole package. In the West, they can't get their foot in the door because the model is different and the music often can't stand up by itself without all that other stuff, and so those who are successful at home are successful in a way that actually limits their chance of success overseas.

On top of that, there's the cultural divide. Western society tends to be more cynical/sarcastic and music reflects those attitudes. As you can see, a "happy happy smile" song is not going to cut it in the West, though it could be very popular in Japan.

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J pop is more about looks, than sound, and they do look a lot better.

The difference in emphasis means that performers from both sides of the pacific do not do well on the far side.

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One reason is they can't sing. I think that says enough.

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Freddy Mercury was very successful with Queen.

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To me, it´s the same as asking ¨why natto have a hard time succeding in the US market?¨. J-artists can not be successful outside Japan. It´s a matter of taste. I can´t not even imagine a crowd of American boys dancing or really enjoying, say, (whatever. I can´t remember one single J-pop name)...

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Because in the US you need somthing called talent... In Japan all you need is some of that gambatte spirit and hair.

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JeromeInJapan said:

Because in the US you need somthing called talent...

I live in America and I sure as hell know better than that.

The Japanese could find a place in a niche market of music or adapt to a market like Alternative. "World Music" would be an excellent fit of a band willing to use an adaptation of traditional Japanese riffs or ancients style chants. "Deep Forest" has been very successful in using indigenous chants and various other traditional inclusions to fill the niche market of world music. Buddha Bar is another great example of filling the same niche market with completely different music. If the Japanese put out a hard core band with throaty lyrics and properly presented the music in a hard core alternative method I feel it would have no problem being accepted. Maybe the German band "Ramstein" has an advantage of deeper voices.

Another route might be a fusion of sampling from Japanese styles (anything from chants, traditional to pop), mixed with alternative music.

I hardly agree with anyone who say that the Japanese could not make it in the American market. It is just a matter of either exploring to find the style that would appeal to Americans or getting exposure to a band that may not currently be considered marketable in the U.S. but in reality is just bizarre enough to be extremely popular in the alternative market.

I cannot properly address Pop music. It is after all a music based on what is fashionable at the moment. It is a style of music that adapts too much to its listeners in my opinion. I would rather listen to a band of substance that fills a niche. Yes, I consider punk bands, world music and alternative music bands of substance. That does not exclude me from collecting and enjoying classical music.

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Hello - language?!

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Haha, I'm glad someone mentioned the 5-6-7-8s. Unfortunately, the biggest pop stars are big merely because they appeal to the lowest common demoninator while the 5-6-7-8s, while incredibly awesome, have a very individual sound. Too screechy for a mainstream market.

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The combination of American focus on talent in a performer's chosen field over all around good looks and fashion and the cultural difference (most Americans are more cynical) makes it odd to hear what to us in an unusually happy song in a foreign language sung by a mediocre singer. Most of our songs are sung by real singers not just good looking people with a microphone and the lyrics usually involve how bad society sucks, how awesome drugs are, how much the singer hates their ex, etc...

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One word: Talentless!

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Remember how some of these no talent imbeciles will take a hit song from the states write it with some crazy japanese lyrics act like its there own and then go make a million dollars on someone elses sound. I can think of a few here in japan and just one in the states, whats his name M Bolton.

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I think that Japan has many talented artist but they have little play in America for the same reason many foreign artist have a problem in the US namely language. Rammstein had some success but I can't remember the last time I heard them on the radio. I recommend that J-Pop stars take an alternative root to the US market much like Moby by having his music played mostly in advertisements. Either that or partnering with established US and European artists.

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In America, if it's not American or British, it's treated as a novelty at best. The same could hold true for Britain.

Plus, if it's not in English, most Americans complain that they can't understand what the singer's saying. Since when did lyrics matter on a dance floor? Oh well.

It certainly isn't a quality issue. No pop music can be considered "good" until 20 years go by and someone gets nostalgic for it.

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Some J performers could succeed in the US with the right spin. Perfume might be interesting. Cute won't work; cool and exotic might...

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Tarent just isn't good enough.

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Language... not only the songs, but during interviews most (closed-minded) Americans will be saying "Speak English!"

Lack of understanding of American culture... not only the Asian pop singers, but the Asian producers don't have a clue about what sells in America. This lack of understanding of American culture also has deep consequences because it also means that there is no basis, or roots for whatever music they try to make... for example, someone already mentioned BoA, but unless she has Americans producers and songwriters, her choice of song/lyric content is probably going to be very limited to very generic subjects/themes with no depth.

A lot of people are talking about lack of talent which is true to an extent. BUT, look at the US pop charts and you will see about half of them have little talent as well, so you don't need to be "talented" in order to be a hit in the US. Those who say "Lack of talent in Asian pop" are probably not comparing apples-to-apples... you need to compare Asian pop vs. US pop, and not Asian pop to American rock or R&B or etc.

Most Asian pop stars would have to change/overhaul their songs, style, and image in order to be a hit in the US.

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I think the last foreign-language song to be a hit in the U.S. was "99 Luftballoons".

Cherry Blossom Girl by Air is mostly in French. It went to number 6 on the Billboard dance charts. Dee-lite had a Japanese bassist, if I recall correctly.

But the real reasons are that Confucianism is the antitheis of rock and roll, and the U.S. has enough vapid talentless poseurs that it doesn't need to import any. Coals to Newcastle, as they say.

Finally, the live scene in Japan is dreadful. In my city, one of the top nightlife cities in Japan, on any given night there's no club you can walk into and see a band that's not a jaded house band that's been playing Beatles covers since Reagan was president.

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Donkusai-you're comment about 'happy happy smile' made me crack up. I believe you're dead on about Western consumers being too dour for the typical J-pop song. I don't know why Western music tradition focuses on pain & suffering so much, but that's another topic for another day. I also don't think racism/lack of talent have anything to do with it, more of a language barrier issue. Throwing random Engrish into songs helps for the J-market, but will get you laughed out of the Western market. I don't know many non-English singing rock/pop songs in the states that haven't been viewed as a goofy fad (Hey, Macarena!). La Bamba certainly could be argued as one that cracked the American market pretty well, but other than that, I can't think of any more that stood the test of time.

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Sorry, Cherry Blossom Girl is in English with an outrrrrageous French accent. My bad.

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erm I think I can answer this one.

because they are generally bereft of anything that could possibly be described as talent

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Also, Japanese musicians should play telecasters, as telecaster players are known to be the most awesome players in the universe (Danny Gatton, Roy Buchanan, Redd Volkkart.. heck, even Hotei picks up a tele and becomes even cooler when he does).

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In niche areas, some Japanese music is pretty good. However, pop by itself is for the popular market - in that sense being from Japan is not particularly generic and is always going to be niche.

I must admit that the popular music I've heard here seems to be equally as bad as the pop music I've heard from the UK or America.

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And lack of charisma on stage. An absence of presence.

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Because Japanese pop sounds like the opening themes of anime... Like songs for children. Inluding the voices. Well, not always, but most of the times.

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Utada Hikaru has a great voice and more talent and charisma then 99% of the artists in America. With proper promotion she can definitely make it big in America.

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Moving away jfrom imported Asian-pop being popular in the US, consider how few US-born Asian stars there at all. Utada Hikaru is a clear exception, but beyond that, there are very few Asian music stars.

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Yes, Utada Hikaru is a remarkable exception to what I wrote above.

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Utada still does the Asian nose-singy-thingy.

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Perhaps some day.

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One reason is that most long term success in the american market is built on live performances. Lip sync performances and uniforms are just not going to cut it. Most Jpop is just not of the quality necessary not to mention that the US audience pretty much demands English. Abba didnt make it singing Swedish....

Boy bands are low talent, lip sync acts but for the average young american girl exile is not going to turn their crank like Jonas Brothers or Back Street Boys...

Utada is unique that even though she is a product of her family launching her career, she writes the majority of her music and is in fact quite talented though her stage presence is not the best. Did is slip anybodies mind that she sings in English?

If B'z , Southern Allstars, Yamazaki Masayoshi sang in English they would have sold zillions of records in the US. Puffy would have done well too in English cause they gave a great concert as does Hamazaki Ayumi.

Bottom line is no English, no sales.... unless you sing in Spanish ; ) then you can have limited success if you have talent and target California/Texas/Floriday ; )

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Pop music is crap in any language. Plus Japanese pop stars are super cheesy as far as fashion and cutesy crap. And sex sells cds in America and most Japanese pop stars don't have that same sex appeal (implants) as America pop stars.

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Talking about the UK market, it’s very resistant to non-English music, unless it’s a novelty hit that they heard while on holiday in Spain. The US market seems to be similar. People like to empathise with/sing along to songs – even instrumental bands never have hit singles – so they listen to songs in a language they understand.

Add to this the vicious circle of the public not buying these artists because they never hear them, but TV/radio won’t play them because the public never buys them. The internet may change this over time, but it’s a slow process.

Shonen Knife are the only Japanese pop band to have any success recently that I can recall.

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In the Japanese market, the producers decide who is the hot star. In the US, they just don't have enough influence to hype bands like SMAP or morning musume.

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Have you heard of Charice Pempengco? A young Filipina singer from the Philippines, is now building a career in the United States. I guess with the right choice of people who would help a talented person make it big in America, plus a great voice, nothing is impossible. Oops, I'm not really into music or whatsoever, I can't even tell what's pop and what's not. It's just that, Charice is also from Asia.

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well I believe the reason why jpop isn't going good in the us is that unless it's rap pop music isn't vary popular any more the music most listened to is rap or rock now take a band like dazzle vision they would do great in the us a good example is der en gray they did great in the us so when you get down to it, it all depend on the style of music you play. not trying to say that jpop is bad or any thing for I'm a fan of artist like Utada Hikaru, BoA, and Aya Ueto

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Because they don't do lines with Hollywood producers.

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probably more business connections and marketing. Ever try buying a Hamasaki album in the US? Big bucks. My daughter love it but how many in America speak Japanese?

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I agree that talent has even less to do with selling well in Japan than it does in the States. The agencies have everything lined up, and the public eat it up. I think there is at least a larger chance for truly talented artists to get big in America.

The lack of a merit-based music market shows up glaringly when Japanese artists try to expand abroad. Also, the stylistic use of nonsense English phrases kills any respectability J-pop artists might have garnered, and that includes Utada Hikaru.

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The Western pop market is already saturated with pre-fabricated no talents, so what would be the point in importing more? There are also cultural factors at work. While Western popular culture is certainly very (overly?) sexualized, it's generally based around a more "mature" sexuality, and by that I mean it's not typically sexed up 15 year-olds or 25 year-old "women" trying to look 15. While "ero-kawaii" works in Japan, it's just creepy in some other places.

There are a lot of great Japanese bands who acquire small, but dedicated followings all over the world. The Zoobombs, Mono, Supercar (rip), the 5-6-7-8s, Cibo Matto, Shonen Knife, The Boredoms, Buffalo Daughter, Cornelius, not to mention DJs like Towa Tei, and Satoshi Tomiie who is easily one of the biggest DJs on the planet.

It's no big loss that the vapid, high-pitched J-pop stars don't cross over, but a lot of good Japanese music is getting through. A lot of the western bands I like don't ever achieve a great deal of commercial success either - but that shouldn't ever be the (sole) measure of an artist or group. If making good music that people really care about is used as the measuring stick, then a lot of J-bands and artists are already quite successful.

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I listen to Japanese, Taiwanese, and Korean pop music all the time, and most people I know who overhear it think it's Spanish. When I tell them, "No, it's Japanese," they look at me like I've grown two spare heads and a third arm. There's a sense, at least in the eastern United States, that Asian culture is this ancient, confusing, looming foreign megalith, with a weird writing system and an indecipherable language system. It doesn't matter how much fun the song is, or how catchy the tune, or how attractive the singer; when you try to explain the difference between -san, -chan, -kun, and -sama, people glaze over and tune it out. Most Americans, I think, are willing to accept "Hola" or "Bonjour" in their music; they haven't yet reached the point where they're ready to decipher "Ohayo" from "Konnichiwa."

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j music? hell no, now that's america.

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Possibly the same reason why foreign movies have a rough going in States. Moreover, American culture is American culture. If it decides to let one or two hits in, then so be it. But the "norm" is that American culture is exported... not the other way around.

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Because squeaking sounds rubbish and the boybands all look like girls?

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because on the whole westerners don't like their music. The (nearly) all sound the same and just don't excite us. It's like Stock Aitken Waterman from the 80's - man was that dross!!

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DeepAir66:

It's like Stock Aitken Waterman from the 80's - man was that dross!!

Now you´re not connecting points here. Stock Aitken may sound dross for you, but their acts were #1 world rankings at the time. You can´t compare SA with Japanese pop, there´s no way. By the way, the 80s´ synthpop wave was great. Where in the world today can you find acts so beautiful as Simple Minds, for instace?

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Their success is mostly limited because of the language barrier, but I also think it's about their limited exposure. It cost money to get airplay in the US. I doubt many, if any, record companies would shell out the dough if they didn't think it was a sure thing.

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Pop music is crap in any language.

Amen, brother.

There was an absolutely incredible band from Hayama that played a lot in Yokosuka back in the early to mid 90s called Unchakatokotong.

They packed the house with Americans who didn't care what language they sang in (rarely in English).

They couldn't get a record contract because they were considered too old (in their 30s), too strange looking (bass player had huge dreads) and their music was considered "too unconventional."

I think a lot of that happens in Japan.

Unchakatokotong would have made it in the states. They absolutely rocked the house whenever they played.

Taka

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Because it's always the same throughout the decades maybe.

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Same reason American cars companies have a hard time succeeding in the Japanese market, I imagine.

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because they suck. obviously

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The US market is the music industry holy grail. It's hard for any foreigners to penetrate, including other English speaking people like British or Australians.

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Stock Aitken may sound dross for you, but their acts were #1 world rankings at the time.

never understood that but what I am saying is to me J-Pop sounds like SAW. I love 80's music many great bands just not SAW (for me) and J-Pop now.

Good job a lot of Japanese have great taste in music evident by the success of British bands here

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one word: racist mentality.

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I guess because they SUCK!

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I agree with littleboy, the U.S. market is ridiculously locked in and close minded. If some of us out there are interested in listening and learning about other cultures, radio is not the place to look. Other types of any other culture other than the "NORM" in the U.S. has to be explored on a personal level. You won't find any other types of music in mainstream media other than hispanic. I for one would love to see Japanese popstars on the cable channels and music on the radio. And why not, we have Univision for hispanics and spanish popstars. Do we not have Asians in America as well, where is the market for them?

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Most do really suck and it certainly helps if you sing in fluent English for starters. The few good ones just haven't been lucky, had the right agents or whatever combination of timing, fundage and connections it takes to make it all click. Plenty of non-white, non-American bands and singers make it moderately big in the US all the time. Whahh, racism...whahh, FAIL.

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I wonder how many people who are saying the American market is closed actually understand the market, particularly those asserting that even other English speakers can't succeed in that market. British acts in particular have had tremendous success in the U.S., as have at least some Australians.

The market isn't simple. It's multi-layered. If you're only looking at the teen market and focusing on manufactured pop acts like Miley Cyrus, then it probably is hard for foreign acts to penetrate. However, the adult markets are wildly varied.

The main issue right now is that rap and hip-hop are popular and that type of music originated largely in the U.S. and few outside acts can manage to do it without looking like copycats. Also, the whole American Idol thing is skewing the current market. In the past, when other types of music (heavy metal, synth-pop, etc.) were riding waves of popularity, there were plenty of foreign acts that were popular. During the heavy metal phase, Def Leppard was played endlessly on MTV (as were the Scorpions, who are German). U2 has been huge in the U.S. and continues to do well there, and Abba was also quite popular. It's the current music trends which are affecting what type of acts become popular, not any inherent lack of desire to enjoy foreign acts.

If you are biased in viewing the U.S. market in a particular way (and ignoring vast sections of the music-buying public and the history of popular music in the U.S.) in order to claim people are racist or closed-minded, I guess you can assert anything.

The bottom line is that Japanese pop groups are generally not very good. They are like 3rd rate Britney Spears. They are just as manufactured and untalented, but not as well polished. Most Japanese groups look like amateur hour when you see them performing.

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Bottomline.. They are just not good enough. Who wants to listen to manufactured popbands who cant sing live in tune or boybands looking so girlish or havent gone thru puberty?

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"...America is closer to music than Japan is. American bands can play as much as they want, whenever they want, for free... in garages of where-you-have. And unlike japanese bands who have to pay a thousand yen an hour to practice once a week..."

I have some friends that play in bands in Japan and is really hard to get enough time and a place to practice enough. An amateur of the west have far more experience in hours of play than most japanese profesionals.

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I don't believe America is so racist that the market isn't open to asian entertainers. Korean stars like BoA and Se7en are becoming known to people who had no familiarity with kpop.

Lack of English ability is a big problem. I cringed when I watched a big name asian entertainer being interviewed in English and muttering answers that weren't related to the questions and were nearly impossible to understand.

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One reason and one reason only: they refuse to put their songs on the US iTunes. That's it. I buy a ton of JPOP all the time, but usually end up having to buy the original discs and rip them, or using a bunch of proxy servers and iTunes to buy it from iTunes Japan.

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Pizzacato...remember them? Great and very popular. Also, a really nice blend of English and a bit of Nihongo. Catchy songs. I have all their cd's.

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Language barrier mainly.

Saying foreign bands can't make it in the USA and racism is patently ridiculous considering the history such as the Beetles, and besides, given how huge rap and hip hop are in the States, how many rap artist do you think are white?

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every singer from asia sucks.

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because Jpop is not the bomb.

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Pizzacato...remember them?

yes, but they not on the MTV so they not take off the bigtime

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maybe I should try to crack the market and make like a bandits there too

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i imagine the problem is the same for a lot of popular culture coming out of asia; artists just don't do their own thing so you either get a poor imitation of a western style, or a tacky take on "traditional culture"

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There are Carribbean artistes who have made it big in the US. Its just a matter of how you sell yourself. The Asians are trying to be like the American artistes...they are just not interested in Asian wanna-be versions of themselves.

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Its not really about talent or racism. It stems down to how you look in the long run, the most successful asian or half-asians in the Western music industry (Bruno Mars, Enrique Iglesias) are chart toppers and hits, Bruno Mars is half-asian (Filipino) but he looks racially ambiguous. That is due to the fact that the Asian stereotype is the Chinese, Japanese stretched eyed people when in fact, Asian is a very wide range of characterstics. In my opinion, the countries with the best shots at having mainstaying power in the U.S market are the Southeast Asian countries (Especially Philippines) due to the fact that they look nothing like the stereotypical Asian. Most southeast Asian people have African, Spanish and even American heritages so its safe to say that they're Asia's best shot at western international fame.

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