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Why do you think toxic online behavior has exacerbated in recent years?

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Its easy for trolls and cowards who don't have the guts to say something to your face to become keyboard warriors once they can post anonymous messages.

Personally, I believe that anonymity is the main reason for toxic behavior. If posters online were made to use their real names and pictures and their real identities made to be known to other posters you would see a SEVERE drop in toxicity. Less anonymity is the key.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

The author of this question is clearly not a gamer, nothing new in the toxic commentary lately vs years ago.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@Aly R. No, it’s the only way left to say something. You simply cannot face everyone in person you want to say something to, in addition you don’t know what reaction comes in affect. As most nerves are blank, they will probably cut you into pieces with their illegal machete or official places will arrest you und close your mouth for years. You can watch this in most countries now. It’s therefore not ‘cowardly’ , but simply a question of surviving someone’s own right to freedom of speech.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

No, it’s the only way left to say something.

Not at all. There are many ways to say things. People post their opinions on Facebook and Youtube and get into arguments there all the time .

You simply cannot face everyone in person you want to say something to, in addition you don’t know what reaction comes in affect.

Then maybe best not to say it. If what you are saying is so outrageous that you feel you have to hide, better not say it at all.

As most nerves are blank, they will probably cut you into pieces with their illegal machete or official places will arrest you und close your mouth for years. You can watch this in most countries now. It’s therefore not ‘cowardly’ , but simply a question of surviving someone’s own right to freedom of speech.

Official places can track your alias down ANYWAY. If you post something that can get you arrested then you will be arrested no matter how anonymous you may think you are.

I'm sorry Brother but I have to disagree. If you have something useful to say then you should be visible. Saying things when you are anonymous is pointless because you are just a ghost on the net.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

I'm sorry Brother but I have to disagree. If you have something useful to say then you should be visible. 

Try China. You'll love it.

If what you are saying is so outrageous that you feel you have to hide, better not say it at all.

Among the ideas that have been considered outrageous: equal rights for all races, genders and sexual orientations, freedom of religion, being against war, the earth orbiting the sun... the list is endless. If you have nothing to say that is considered outrageous and might upset people, then you are not paying attention. Every single pioneer that has ever sacrificed for the greater good has been considered outrageous.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

I'm sorry Brother but I have to disagree. If you have something useful to say then you should be visible. 

Try China. You'll love it.

I've lived in even more authoritarian places than China, so spare me the haughty lecture. And we are addressing the topic of toxic behavior online NOT human rights. Back on topic please.

Among the ideas that have been considered outrageous: equal rights for all races, genders and sexual orientations, freedom of religion, being against war, the earth orbiting the sun... the list is endless. If you have nothing to say that is considered outrageous and might upset people, then you are not paying attention. Every single pioneer that has ever sacrificed for the greater good has been considered outrageous.

And all of these things were said without social media. You don't need social media to say outrageous things or things that are not considered mainstream. It is you who isn't paying attention

However, anonimity is the cause for online toxic behavior. And that is what we are addressing

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Politics has allowed people to say things out loud they would have otherwise kept to themselves. Also certain countries have whole industries devoted to stirring the pot of ignorance, lies and prejudice online.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Lack of consequences and lack of empathy. Also there are larger societal trends at play such as small families, few or no siblings and breakup of the extended family. If you have siblings you have a lot of opportunities to deal with and overcome conflict, and if you live with or near grandparents they often serve as a moral compass. I would not want my kids to be online subject to the abuse and I wouldn't want it myself either.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

A lack of honesty, a legitimising of falsehoods and anything goes attitude of some platforms in order to increase traffic and revenue.

The internet can be a force for good, but that is all to often diverted down dark pathways.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Let's see. The need to obtain the likes and admiration of other people and the addicting gratification and crippling depression that both come with it, the narrow-mindedness of people who can't tolerate and respect differences, and the bombardment of too much information, whether they be true, fake, useful or otherwise. In my opinion, the internet and other social vectors have always been toxic and that the increase of more people on the internet is just making the toxicity of it more pronounced.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Also adding to the toxicity and bad feeling, in my opinion, is the proliferation of "likes" and upvotes and downvotes. Even marvelous JT has a current crop of negativity, what with human interest stories, esp. when posters express solidarity or good wishes to someone suffering from the ongoing economic strife.

It's very strange and slightly disheartening to see that so many have emptiness in their hearts.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

And we are addressing the topic of toxic behavior online NOT human rights. Back on topic please.

You are discussing stripping human rights to combat "toxic behavior." Your topic, whether you know it or not.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

We are living in a world-wide unofficial totalitarian regime so the toxicity coming from people against the regime's political correctness is understandable though sometimes people adopt idiotic conspiracy theories.In a few years this totalitarian worldwide regime will become official and there won't be any opportunities to do that.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@Aly Rustom

I’ve always respected that you put it out there in your own name. A welcome change to the various sock puppets which pop up on here.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

And we are addressing the topic of toxic behavior online NOT human rights. Back on topic please.

You are discussing stripping human rights to combat "toxic behavior." Your topic, whether you know it or not.

That is ridiculous. Nobody’s talking about stripping human rights Except you. You go on a rant about China, The earth revolving around the sun for heaven sake, LGBT rights, Freedom of religion and equality for the genders and what not. Absolutely nothing to do with what we’re talking about which is Internet trolling and other bad online behavior.

While we were talking about is more responsibility for what you post online. And judging by your posts, you might’ve just proven my point.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@Aly Rustom

I’ve always respected that you put it out there in your own name. A welcome change to the various sock puppets which pop up on here.

Thank you so much for your kind words brother. Appreciate it. And yes I stand by what I said. If there was less anonymity on the Internet there would be a lot less toxic behavior because people would police themselves. It’s that simple.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

And yes I stand by what I said. If there was less anonymity on the Internet there would be a lot less toxic behavior because people would police themselves. It’s that simple.

I dunno, Aly.

There's a lot of toxic accounts on FB, people posting all manner of insulting/conspiracy theories and bigotry. Obviously, it gets flagged faster and the accounts are suspended or ended but sadly, I think it's something that permeates the internet.

I learned, for instance, to be wary of imparting personal information. There's some bad people out there, unfortunately.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

 You go on a rant about China...

Not a rant. Just a few words pointing out what you continue to deny. In rant-like fashion I might add.

And judging by your posts, you might’ve just proven my point.

What point is that?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I night add, I have done nothing but disagree with you here - and you are now saying that constitutes a toxic post. This is why people need anonymity. In your case, everything you write can be used against you for years to come. While most of your opinions are fairly mainstream now, things can change a lot in even 10 years. Potential employers, partners or clients will be able to dig though all your posts and find something that casts a bad light on you - especially in the current judgmental mob-mentality society we have now.

I stand by what I say, but I don't want to share it with the world because I have other responsibilities and relationships that need to be preserved. The internet has increased the mob mentality. Someday, even hard as you might try to stay on the mob's good side, you might find yourself on the outside.

Just some friendly advice. You can delete Twitter/Facebook posts to make them harder (but not impossible) to find. But not your posts here.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

> Not a rant. Just a few words pointing out what you continue to deny.

The only thing I am denying is your Ridiculous claim that anonymity somehow has something to do with human rights. It is a strawman argument

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I night add, I have done nothing but disagree with you here - and you are now saying that constitutes a toxic post.

No you made some snide remarks about my moving to China.

This is why people need anonymity. In your case, everything you write can be used against you for years to come.

Then you should think about what you are writing and be careful about what you post.

While most of your opinions are fairly mainstream now, things can change a lot in even 10 years. Potential employers, partners or clients will be able to dig though all your posts and find something that casts a bad light on you - especially in the current judgmental mob-mentality society we have now.

I have some news for you. If you really think that a username is going to protect your anonymity from a future employer or government official you’re completely wrong. What anonymity does is just allow for toxic behavior on the Internet. But if people want to find out who you really are they can. Any hacker can do that.

I stand by what I say, but I don't want to share it with the world because I have other responsibilities and relationships that need to be preserved. The internet has increased the mob mentality. Someday, even hard as you might try to stay on the mob's good side, you might find yourself on the outside.

Again, your argument does not hold water because if somebody wants to find out what your identity is a pseudo name is not gonna protect you

Just some friendly advice. You can delete Twitter/Facebook posts to make them harder (but not impossible) to find. But not your posts here.

Well thank you for the friendly advice; I appreciate it. But like you I always stand by what I say and I hold true to my convictions as well. Maybe finally we have some thing we found that we can agree on

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I dunno, Aly.

There's a lot of toxic accounts on FB, people posting all manner of insulting/conspiracy theories and bigotry. Obviously, it gets flagged faster and the accounts are suspended or ended but sadly, I think it's something that permeates the internet.

I learned, for instance, to be wary of imparting personal information. There's some bad people out there, unfortunately

Yeah that’s a very good point. Point taken

0 ( +2 / -2 )

your Ridiculous claim that anonymity somehow has something to do with human rights. 

The right to anonymity and privacy are human rights issues. That's not even a debate.

But if people want to find out who you really are they can.

Of course, that's a given. And since we agree that is true, then why is there any need to forbid anonymity? None, since a little detective work or a simple hack will reveal most people.

However, anonymity does provide casual protection. A nosy neighbor or a potential employer normally is not going to dig that deep. That's why we have curtains, and locks on doors. A determined person can see inside your house, a determined thief can break in. But they protect against the casual intrusions, the kid trying out the door to see if it opens, for example.

The modern world is all but eliminating privacy, so we must do what we can to preserve it - even in limited form. This is one point that I think Japanese appreciate far more than most Westerners.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The right to anonymity and privacy are human rights issues. That's not even a debate.

Not when you decide to get on a public platform. And by the way, many sites REQUIRE you to give your real name and provide a picture when you make a profile.

And since we agree that is true, then why is there any need to forbid anonymity? None, since a little detective work or a simple hack will reveal most people.

Because we are not talking about governments figuring out your identity. We are talking about toxic behavior and trolling, which can be greatly reduced if the average posters all know each others' names. This site is a great example. A lot of keyboard warriors trolling regular posters here.

However, anonymity does provide casual protection.

Especially for those who want to behave badly.

A nosy neighbor or a potential employer normally is not going to dig that deep. That's why we have curtains, and locks on doors. A determined person can see inside your house, a determined thief can break in. But they protect against the casual intrusions, the kid trying out the door to see if it opens, for example.

Yes but too much anonymity also gives rise to very bad behavior. If there was less anonymity people would be still much more careful with what they post.

The modern world is all but eliminating privacy, so we must do what we can to preserve it - even in limited form. This is one point that I think Japanese appreciate far more than most Westerners.

True, but I also think we should be held accountable for what we put online.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Not really, it is just that social media makes it more evident and easy to reach people that were not aware of it before.

In a sense is the same as many other problems found online, from crime to misinformation, previously only people involved in gaming or forums were aware of how common it was for people to become toxic, now anybody visiting Twitter can be exposed to everything, from death threats to repeated lies about world conspiracies.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Not really, it is just that social media makes it more evident and easy to reach people that were not aware of it before.

In a sense is the same as many other problems found online, from crime to misinformation, previously only people involved in gaming or forums were aware of how common it was for people to become toxic, now anybody visiting Twitter can be exposed to everything, from death threats to repeated lies about world conspiracies.

Another excellent point

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

many sites REQUIRE you to give your real name and provide a picture when you make a profile.

That's completely up to each site to decide, as it should be.

We are talking about toxic behavior and trolling, which can be greatly reduced if the average posters all know each others' names. This site is a great example. 

Again, up to each site. This site has some especially hostile behavior, especially for a moderated site. I have often wondered why that is. Meanwhile, on YouTube, which is filled with trolls, certain videos attract a very high level of comments, while other videos are cesspools in the comment area.

A certain level of bad behavior is to be expected in life. Efforts to legislate it away are overreaching and harmful. With everybody having a platform these days, people need to learn to accept different or even hostile viewpoints - within reason. This is we learn and grow. Any well moderated site is usually successful at weeding out the worst of the lot.

Political posts bring out the worst in people's emotions, but open political discussions are essential. Without anonymity, too many reasonable and thoughtful people with "wrong opinions" that are also important opinions will be forced into silence to protect their job or public image. Without diversity of, though, you get extremism. And that's why some anonymity is important.

If some anonymous person tells you to go live in China, that should hardly ruin your day. I've lived there - and it's not all bad.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Again, up to each site. This site has some especially hostile behavior, especially for a moderated site. I have often wondered why that is. Meanwhile, on YouTube, which is filled with trolls, certain videos attract a very high level of comments, while other videos are cesspools in the comment area.

Well in that we are in total agreement. I do believe it is up to each site As to what policies to dictate and I do not think that there should be a one size fits all. However the main question on the site was why there is toxic behavior and my personal opinion is that the answer is anonymity.

A certain level of bad behavior is to be expected in life.

Yes but people still should be held accountable for their bad behavior

Efforts to legislate it away are overreaching and harmful.

Doing anything about it can also be even more harmful

With everybody having a platform these days, people need to learn to accept different or even hostile viewpoints - within reason. This is we learn and grow. Any well moderated site is usually successful at weeding out the worst of the lot.

There are very few sites like that.

Political posts bring out the worst in people's emotions, but open political discussions are essential.

Well you’re talking about a mature conversation. That’s fine. Why can’t people use their real names if they’re going to actually have an honest and frank discussion?

Without anonymity, too many reasonable and thoughtful people with "wrong opinions" that are also important opinions will be forced into silence to protect their job or public image.

Nobody’s forced to do anything. You make a choice in life. People should not be allowed to hide behind aliases and then run rampant on the Internet. If you have something worthwhile to say and you want to engage in meaningful discussion then I don’t see any reason why people cannot use their real names. In fact, if you are engaging in meaningful discussion under an alias I think it takes away from your arguments. And your credibility.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Without diversity of, though, you get extremism. And that's why some anonymity is important.

Whether or not you have diversity of thought you always have extremism. Extremism is always here and it never goes away. In fact you can look at the United States right now. There is definitely diversity of thought there yet extremism has never been higher on both sides.

I would disagree with you on this- I think extremism is protected by anonymity. Anonymity allows someone to express extremist views they otherwise would not feel comfortable to express if their identity and profile was open to the public.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yes. You need look no further than this website, which has taken a real downturn in recent months specifically, and since the introduction of votes generally.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The social media companies are also very biased in the application of their own rules though. Twitter, for example, will let users post things like "kill TERFs" ('trans-excluding radical feminists') with a picture of someone waving a knife around as well as other things that would be considered outrageous misogyny (anti-women ideology). Then, on the other hand, a woman simply posting "sex is real" will be temporarily suspended or permanently banned.

This partisan tolerance just encourages certain groups to become more extreme in the knowledge nothing will happen to them

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I think anonymity plays a part but using real names is really not the solution. The only solution is to have verified like Twitter so the opinion is valued more for those individuals by the community.

It's interesting that users bring up the voting on this site which I think is fine. Indicates overall whither people agree with the opinion but does not give it more coverage due to likes. the comment is still voiced and etc.... Unpopular opinion is just that, doesn't mean it's wrong or anything.

The amount of bots and motivated individuals that perpetually try to clog the channels is as large a problem than the toxicity if not more.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Try China. You'll love it.

Uhh No

Try North Korea.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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