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Would you rather see a movie that is not in your native language, with subtitles or dubbed into your own language?

32 Comments

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32 Comments
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Subtitles

9 ( +10 / -1 )

subtitles, assuming good translation

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Subtitles.

Dubbing loses too much.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Subtitles. Even animated movies. Too much can be lost in translation... And expression of the voices used originally is hard to translate.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Always subtitles. Dubbing takes away content to cross the language gap. Subtitles add content.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Subtitled...of course!!!

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Subtitles: it's super-irritating if the speech and mouth movements aren't in synch, even if I can't speak the language.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Subtitles!!

Except for old Kung Fu flicks, then dubbing for sure!!

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Besides the mouth synching, often the voice-actors voice don't match the character in the movie. Too tough, comical, potty-mouthed, etc.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Subtitles for me too.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Subtitles. Native speakers get the original, second-language people get the gist. Both can learn the other language, if they so desire.

Also, I noticed most male characters in an English-language movie have extremely deep voices when a Japanese voice-actor dubs the local version. Not all males have deep voices. And when a female character in an English-language movie smiles, the Japanese voice actor giggles. I very rarely see an American female character giggle unless to show how childish / stupid they are.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Subtitles.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

LOL, what a question... I think you'll find too few true movie lovers that would agree to dubbing...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I'm thinking Japanese movies here. Subtitles for me too. The Japanese language is full of necessary atmosphere. Don't want to cut that out.

When Japanese voices are rendered into spoken English, the Japanese names all get pronounced wrongly, and because there is no 'universal spoken English' the accents of the voices will generally turn some segment of people off.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I love hearing tough American Detective women talking like grandmothers.

"Atashi Wa" Wonderful. Makes them appear so....unpowerful.

Subtitles.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Always subtitles. Nuances in language translation make it work. Get the real feel of the writer's intention lost in translation, be it a rhyme or joke or emotion. Toronto Film Festival showcases hundreds of movies, and subtitled are popular and aren't a problem.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Definitely subs.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In my experience, the people who prefer dubbed films are either a/lazy, b/grew up watching ONLY dubbed movies/series and simply dunno what they are missing, c/were full blown bogans/rednecks, d/all of the above.

@GW, comment of the day :)!!!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Me too ! I agree with all those who prefer subtitles i.e. pretty much all of the above ! Dubbing really can make the meaning "lost in translation" and as others have said, neither the voices nor the words match the originals.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Subtitles..

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It depends.

For a great movie, subtitles.

For an average movie, dubbed. I don't want to have to watch everything and read.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Well, it would depend on my mood. Also, on the specifics. I'm no fan of Bollywood, so I probably wouldn't care less whether the actors' voices were dubbed by a Brooklyn, cockney, Aussie accent or whatever. I'm just a casual viewer. Now if I were an ardent student of Chinese, Vietnamese, Gaelic, Arabic, whatever, I'd probably prefer the original with subs. Why? Well, need I bother to explain. For the love of the language obviously.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Definitely subs, for all the above-mentioned reasons. Besides, when you're from a small country, you're used to subtitles on most things. It really isn't that hard paying attention to the movie while reading ;)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Subtitles. I agree with Borscht's summary above.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You would have to be a literal simpleton to say you can't watch the movie and read subtitles at the same time.

May god have mercy on the souls of those who can't.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Subtitles definitely. Usually the native language can nail the emotional responses in their voice alone.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Also, I noticed most male characters in an English-language movie have extremely deep voices when a Japanese voice-actor dubs the local version. Not all males have deep voices. And when a female character in an English-language movie smiles, the Japanese voice actor giggles. I very rarely see an American female character giggle unless to show how childish / stupid they are.

I guess they are trying to make the character sound tough by doing the low voice thing but I agree they go overboard. Sometimes even a female is given a low voice like the Japanese version of Teri Hatcher in Desperate Housewives. As for the giggling, it just shows how things are lost in translation when you watch the dubbed version.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I can't read much Japanese and I would rather watch a Chinese movie with subtitles in Japanese, than a movie dubbed into any of the languages I speak. That's how much I dislike dubbed movies.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'll take subtitles over dubbing thanks. I've seen too much bad dubbing for my own taste. Take Pokemon for example, which I've seen translate onigiri as both sandwiches and as jelly doughnuts. Not even remotely close to what onigiri is. I could give plenty of other examples of bad dubbing, but this is certainly one of the most baffling and frankly embarrassing translation errors I've come across.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Take Pokemon for example, which I've seen translate onigiri as both sandwiches and as jelly doughnuts. Not even remotely close to what onigiri is. I could give plenty of other examples of bad dubbing, but this is certainly one of the most baffling and frankly embarrassing translation errors I've come across.

If it was a translation error, wouldn't it have happened regardless of whether it was dubbed or subtitled? Things also get lost in translation in subtitles, because they translate it literally from the script. For example, I remember a scene from Homeland a couple seasons ago where they said "take him out" as in "shoot him" but the Japanese subtitles (have those on for my j-wife) said "take him outside (外に連れてくれ) ". And this was on a show broadcast by Fox Japan. It was one of the few times I actually glanced at the subtitles, so who knows how may other errors my wife might be reading.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Definitely subtitles! Dubbing messes with the whole ambiance of a film.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Subtitles... respect for the actors the screen, and their language.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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