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680 cars still stranded in heavy snow in central Japan

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Not a single snow plow to be seen...?

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

This article is out of date missing a lot of information. At least one person has died as of last night.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Fukui city doesn't get a lot of snow I was told (uncle in law lives there), so this is quite unexpected for them. And like Tokyo they don't have snow ploughs, because there's generally no need for them.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Since your tank will run dry after about three hours, assuming full to start with, your heating will cut out in due course, so always carry extra blankets, gloves, hats etc when driving in winter here. And if your tailpipe gets clogged with snow, you could be breathing carbon monoxide as the poor fellow in the article above. A simple car journey must have turned into a freezing nightmare for the people in those 1,500 vehicles.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Very sad. I was involved in a similar situation on a road trip in the Sierra Nevadas of California. You might think California is crowded, but get away from the coasts and some mountain roads and you will see no one. We got caught in heavy snow and pulled over to rest with the heat running. I recall we cracked a window just in case. But really there is nothing you can do in such a situation.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Not saying it was warm outside, but certainly he could have opened a window to alleviate the CO2 issue.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

If you live in japan and a have car, always keep the tank full, and have water, emergency food, first aid kit, extra clothes and jumper cables. There are many dangers here.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Apparently the snow is so heavy that it is piled high between each car or truck. No way that a snow plough/plow can get in between each of those vehicles. As soon as they clear a gap, the snow comes on hard again... Definitely still an on-going situation.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I don't understand why they didn't check the weather casts before starting their journeys? This time of the year I always check the overnight temperature and if 1 deg C or less, I turn off my water from the street. Had too many problems with broken pipes.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

We got caught in heavy snow and pulled over to rest with the heat running. I recall we cracked a window just in case. But really there is nothing you can do in such a situation.

My family got caught in a situation like this once, when the predicted blizzard hit hours earlier than expected. My mom got out every little while to check the tail pipe and clear snow. We had emergency supplies in the back of the car - blankets, gloves, nuts and chocolate, etc. and very fortunately had a CB radio in the car. Some nearby farmers eventually heard our calls and came in a convoy. Pulled us out with a big tractor. We were then storm-stayed on the farm for 5 more days. As a little kid, it was a great adventure. For my parents, it had been a very hairy night, that turned out lucky.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

By the way, how would an electric car (the car of the future) hold up in a blizzard? Would the battery keep powering the heater or would the battery get too cold and become useless?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Since your tank will run dry after about three hours,

If your car is near empty, yeah. If not, there is something seriously wrong with your engine.

If you live in japan and a have car, always keep the tank full, and have water, emergency food, first aid kit, extra clothes and jumper cables. There are many dangers here.

For the average motorist, the only dangers you have to worry about is a senile senior going the wrong way on a 1 way street and the like.

Unless you live in the alps, that list is anal retentive. Common sense in waiting out the storm at home or at work should have been enough.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

clamenza, thanks for that, a kind of relief!

A search of the net shows that a car can run all weekend or more simply idling. (I was imagining driving at a steady 70 mph which really sucks the stuff up. ) So most of these people who spent the night in their cars will have been OK and warm.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

This happen to me once. There was a forecast of no blizzard, then driving home it hit and I had to turn back to the town I came from. Then I just kept living the same day over and over and over again.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Reckless, “I was involved in a similar situation on a road trip in the Sierra Nevadas of California.”

Me too! Decades ago. Snow was not too terrible right where we were but hundreds of cars were prevented from going forwards or backwards by deep snow in both directions. Having never seen snow before, having very little food or drink with us in the middle of nowhere with no stores or anything other thN trees, and having studied about the Donner Party in elementary school, the situation was somewhat unnerving. About 30 hours later the line of cars finally started moving and we came out okay. Similar experience on a train here in Japan taught me to never get on board without some food and water in my bag. Stay safe everyone

4 ( +4 / -0 )

the “stranded” were on a main road and I’m sure spent no more than an hour in their cars before simply walking to a nearby house or business.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

the “stranded” were on a main road and I’m sure spent no more than an hour in their cars before simply walking to a nearby house or business.

Guess you don't get out of Chiba much these days. No snow chains for ya tricycle?

Not only cars, but also trucks and buses.

https://au.news.yahoo.com/video/watch/38862010/hundreds-of-vehicles-trapped-on-highway-by-thick-snow-in-japans-fukui-prefecture/

5 ( +6 / -1 )

There's no "simply" about it, this is pretty major

https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2018/02/e075e5c51ab1-1-killed-over-1500-cars-stranded-in-snow-in-japan.html

a line of some 1,500 vehicles stretched for about 10 kilometers on Route 8. The Ground Self-Defense Force mobilized more than 700 personnel to help remove snow and provide water and food to drivers.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I live in Fukui city and always use Route 8.

To all the people making light of the situation, or comments like 'watch the weather forecast': It's really serious, we didn't see this coming and snowplows/heavy machinery can only do so much...

8 ( +8 / -0 )

A quick look at JMA, the Japanese weather people, shows that they do get quite a bit of snow in Fukui City every year. Their average annual max snow depth is 55cm, so they will have snow ploughs and huge snowblowers and graders (road scrapers) and gritters and all the rest.

It sounds like they've been pounded with an overpowering amount of snow this year, especially in this past week. They've got nearly 1.5m now, more than a good few of the ski towns (!) Unlike them, Fukui City is only 10m above sea level. Most super snowy parts of Japan are further inland and get their snow from damp air rising up the mountains and dumping everything it has.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I just looked at Google Maps of Fukui Prefecture and it seems like very beautiful country. Please stay safe for those of you living there.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Im wondering if the Army could help in this situation.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm curious why the trains would be affected as their weight generally plows through snow (and is fun to watch). Maybe due to switching problems?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

LitosanToday, “Im wondering if the Army could help in this situation.”

No need to wonder. As the article states, self-defense forces have been hard at work clearing snow. They’ve also done good work checking on people and distributing food and water

“About 900 GSDF personnel were mobilized following the Fukui prefectural government's application of the disaster relief law”

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Sf2k, “I'm curious why the trains would be affected as their weight generally plows through snow”

The simple answer is that they cannot plow through snow when there is too much to plow through. Train stoppages or delays due to snow are nothing unusual up here in northern Tohoku.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

More typically with a snowplow nose or another small car added to the front: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AX2TUYvTVgQ

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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