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1,600 women take part in New Year archery event

13 Comments

About 1,600 women took part in an annual New Year archery event for new adults at Sanjusangendo, a Buddhist temple in Kyoto, on Sunday.

The archery tournament (kyudo in Japanese) involves the women shooting at a one-meter-wide target 60 meters away. The archers shoot in groups. Each archer is given two arrows and has two minutes in which to hit the targets. Those who hit the target with both arrows advance to the second round.

The traditional event dates back to the early 1600s.

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13 Comments
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Such a beautiful tradition. Never change Japan.

Wish my boring ass country had events like this.

12 ( +15 / -3 )

So powerful looking and so sexy. This is why Japanese women are so in control of this country no matter what anyone thinks.

6 ( +16 / -10 )

This is why Japanese women are so in control of this country no matter what anyone thinks.

as long as its not in a position of power and business

0 ( +10 / -10 )

Nice. Women with skills competing.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

I like Japan so much! What a tradition, so cool isn't it dudes?

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Wish my boring ass country had events like this.

Our boring countries think it’s misogynistic. Glad that Japan has managed to hang on to traditional things like this.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

This is a skill I'd love to learn. I wish there were a sports centre near me which taught it.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Vibrant colors and beautiful women in that pic. I do love Japan.

+1

5 ( +5 / -0 )

as long as its not in a position of power and business

love how people down vote me but fail to provide proof that Im wrong. lol

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

as long as its not in a position of power and business

love how people down vote me but fail to provide proof that Im wrong. lol

I didn't vote you down, but what kind of proof are you hoping for? Power and business seem two quite separate concepts to me. Would power not mean not having to engage in business?

Let's just enjoy the spectacle of these women firing arrows. Concentration and outer calmness - and all that social stuff far from their minds.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Ignoring the subject of gender for a moment, it is a matter of record that the Duke of Wellington inquired about the possibility of having an outfit of longbow men attached to his army. They are generally effective at three times the range of the muskets of the Napoleonic Era, and can be fired about four times as fast. They might have been very lethal against the massed formations of the day, although it is more difficult to train someone to use the longbow.

At the Battle of the Little Big Horn in 1876, aka Custer's Last Stand, about 2,000 mounted Native Americans armed mostly with bows and arrows defeated 700 cavalrymen armed with repeating rifles. Custer had split his forces into smaller units, enabling the Indians to defeat them piecemeal.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

1glennToday  12:03 pm JST

At the Battle of the Little Big Horn in 1876, aka Custer's Last Stand, about 2,000 mounted Native Americans armed mostly with bows and arrows defeated 700 cavalrymen armed with repeating rifles.

I don't think so. All 700 men of the US 7th Calvarly under Lt Col Custer were armed with Army issued breech-loading, single-shot Springfield Model 1873 carbines and 1873 Colt single-action revolvers.

Of the 2000 mostly Lakota and Cheyenne warriors, 200 had Winchester repeating rifles. The others carried smooth bore caplocks or rifled muskets from thje Civil War. Single shot cartridge breech loaders such as Henrys, Sharps, Spencers were also used. The younger braves carried bows and lances which appear very prominent in artwork commemorating the battle, but it was a far cry from a guns vs bows battle.

As you point out, the main reason for the 7th Cav's defeat was strategic.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Archery is a treat to watch. Asians are still good at it. An Indian epic describes Abhimanyu, Eklavya, Arjuna, Bhisma, Dronacharya, Ramachandra and Mahadeva as skillful exponents of the bow and arrow culture.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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