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10 detainees go on hunger strike at Japanese immigration center

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Hurry up ship them back to where they came from they will get all the freedom they want there...

26 ( +40 / -14 )

It's an affront to human rights how immigration detainees are treated here.

-7 ( +23 / -30 )

It's an affront to human rights how immigration detainees are treated here.

And an embarrassment to Japan and people as a civil society

-7 ( +25 / -32 )

over two years

That is a long time to wait to be sent back. Long detention times are very damaging. Some have families they are trying to provide for. 2 years is a long time to just toy with someone's life.

In the US the rule is 72 hours but recent studies have showed that they spend an average of one week to 27 days behind bars waiting for deportation.

15 ( +23 / -8 )

I agree, Japan needs to do better.

Send them back to their home country ASAP

18 ( +29 / -11 )

Deport them faster.

If the person refuses deportation, detention.

I wish them a very happy 20-30 days.

18 ( +27 / -9 )

They are fighting their deportation. They could go back to their home countries if they wanted. Sorry, no sympathy for them. They came here illegally, got caught and are now wasting time and tax payers money. Im my opinion, they should be charged for lodgings and food for their stay.

17 ( +32 / -15 )

 "We are not criminals but are simply seeking freedom."

Powerful words, but sadly, it's not the right place to come to for "freedom" as a foreigner. Each and everyone of you reading this know exactly what I'm talking about.

12 ( +19 / -7 )

Agree with Chip and Osaka

-4 ( +12 / -16 )

what is the hunger strike for? better medical care, a wider variety of goods purchasable at the commissary, or their long dentention?

and the article doesn't state that many of these people have been issued deportation orders after their visa expired but are now fighting it. so that's why they are being detained. this is a more balanced story: https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20190902/p2a/00m/0fe/009000c

17 ( +21 / -4 )

Just print some more money.... something Japan does quite well, and pay some country to take these people.

-13 ( +1 / -14 )

Japanese don't care, so a hunger strike is pointless.

Want to hunger strike, do it in Europe or in Canada, but not in Japan.

-6 ( +13 / -19 )

there are no situations that need to be made public.

Sorry as the public pay your salary and for the detention so the public have a vested interest and should be aware of say mass hunger strikes, lack of medical attention, prolonged detention, abuse, and strangely enough use of fire hoses to "clean" detainees. Lock downs, withdrawals of basic necessities.

Two years of detention is abysmal. Get your act together Japan form a group of experts to urge a change that should take several years....and we all know nothing will change.

0 ( +13 / -13 )

Every action brings a consequence.. You came to Japan illegaly you will end in a detention center waiting for your deserved deportation..

Japan doesn't need illegal people who will bring problems to the country and won't contribute positively to the society..

The best can do with these people is deport them ASAP..

Do you want to do blatant hunger strikes after doing things illegaly??, or need asylum??, go to Europe, Canada, Trumpland..

Japan is not for everybody !!..

8 ( +22 / -14 )

I am not sure if warnings are given beforehand but travel companies in places like South Asia, Africa and Central/South America should tell their citizens before coming to Japan that it is absolutely impossible to gain refugee status in Japan and you may face detention.

13 ( +15 / -2 )

The propensity for the J authorities to seemingly choose cruelty, even when unwarranted or avoidable is a noted concern to many observers. Again, there is little logic, reason or commonsense in these detentions other than the (ab) use of power on the powerless detainees ( a common phenomena in Japan). Any objectionable queries are deemed as an affront to its ( J's ) sovereignty.

-4 ( +10 / -14 )

To those posters wanting detainees to pay for their food and "accommodation" - these people are poor (that's why they leave their homelands) and probably can't afford going commercial rates. Shakespeare in The Merchant of Venice had a solution for people who can't pay their debts - take a pound of flesh instead. How would that suit?

-6 ( +9 / -15 )

Absolutely agree with Mr. Kipling and others.

They are staying by choice.

I'm sure whatever they did, there is a perfectly legitimate reason for them being deported. Yet they want to fight the deportation and stage some pitiful hunger strike that accomplishes nothing.

Japan should send them back to their home countries ASAP.

9 ( +20 / -11 )

The immigration bureau has refused to comment on the reported hunger strike, saying that "there are no situations that need to be made public."

A pretty straightforward, "Move along, nothing to see here" statement. The strategy of not dealing with problems may work for some mate, but you don't get to decide and forced that on others. These people have families somewhere. The arrogance of shutting down inquiries into what maybe possible human rights abuses must be addressed.

A prolonged state of 'limbo and indecision' maybe a lifestyle choice for some, but its torture for most others. Just send the poor sod home if you are going to. Move!

-6 ( +7 / -13 )

A high school's friend brother was held there close to two months before he was finally shipped out to Hawaii with literally nothing in his possession. That detention center must deal with a lot I suppose, but they should be getting it right without messing things up enough to be written about.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

So they take illegal actions and are upset that they're caught? They think they're own country will feel sympathetic for them that they would beg to have them back? Silly Disney princesses. Then now they are killing themselves and want to blame the country they escaped to, illegally? Puppets.

6 ( +14 / -8 )

I'm sure many have heard of the rueful poem by Nazi-turned anti-Nazi Lutheran pastor Martin Niemoller where he laments " First they came for the communists, I didn't speak up because I wasn't a communist ..." he ends " then they came for me but there was nobody to speak for me."

As it is now, the wolf is ripping and eating the strays and the weak, it will then work its way gradually from the outer edges of the flock inwards. We're cheering it for " cleansing " the flock of the aberrant members, but, as the wolf works its way in , one day, we at the center will be on the outer edges and will have to look at the wolf squarely in the eyes, that we forget , the same rights that guard us also must guard the yet to be processed criminals and do not speak up, is our first wrong.

The brutal truth is that these people have been commodified. Most have not and will not go through the process. They are being locked in to provide jobs for their jailers and keep the whole value chain ( suppliers to detention industry tycoons depend on these commodity they call detainees, it essentially connotes " bad seed " in our society therefore immunizes the authorities from sharper eyes of scrutiny from us. Commodities they are.

-4 ( +9 / -13 )

I sense the investors are having a ball with this! How much would it cost the taxpayers each detainee provisions? Sad indeed. A complete breach of human rights.

1 ( +9 / -8 )

Around 10 foreigners detained at an immigration facility in Osaka have staged a hunger strike to protest their protracted detention, their supporters said Wednesday.

The article clearly says " ..hunger strike.to protest the protracted detention..)

No where is it indicative of the detainees fighting deportation as is claimed by some posters here. Am I reading a different article ?

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Long detention times for people you are going to deport makes no sense. At this point you are prolonging the waste of taxpayer money.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Mr Kipling and nakanoguy01 are correct.

The detainees are free to go back to their respective countries provided, they will pay for their own transportation expenses. Immigration authority is not holding them back if their cases are not criminalized. I don't see why they can not afford the airfares since the detainees are demanding that more goods be available for purchase within the facility. If they have no means to pay for their airfares, they are allowed to work for menial jobs inside the immigration centers or ask for charitable institutions for help. Besides, there is a possibility that the detainees purposely challenge the deportation so they can avail themselves for extended free 3 meals a day and a clean place to sleep instead of going back to their respective countries to work for food.

in addition to urging Japan to stop long detention periods and provide specific reasons when provisional release requests are denied.*

These people are not asysum seekers in the first place either.

Asylum seekers can be detained during proceedings as provided by Articles 39–43 of the ICRRA. However, in certain cases asylum seekers may be entitled to a temporary permit (ICRRA Article 61-2-4). State-sponsored legal aid is not available to asylum seekers.

Criminalization. Article 70 of ICCRA provides criminal punishments for violations of a number of immigration related provisions, including illegal entry and overstaying. Punishments include up to three years imprisonment and/or a fine up to JPY3,000,000 (USD 32,000) (ICRRA Art. 70). Officially recognized refugees and asylum-seekers who declared asylum immediately after the entrance or expiration of the permitted period of stay, are exempt from these penalties (ICRRA Art. 70-2). 

Grounds for deportation. Article 24 of ICRRA contains a detailed list of persons subject to expulsion from the country. These include persons who have: (1) entered irregularly or overstayed their visas; (2) committed certain crimes; (3) forged documents; (4) been involved in unauthorized income-generating activities; (5) been in involved in migrant trafficking; or (6) been suspected of terrorist activities.

Grounds for detention and mandatory detention. Article 39 provides that an immigration control officer may detain non-nationals suspected of falling into one of the categories outlined in Article 24. Officials of the Immigration Bureau are generally responsible for initiating deportation procedures and issuing detention orders. Although the law makes detention decisions discretionary, the Japanese government and Immigration Bureau apply the principle of Zenken-Shuyo Shugi(literal translation is “detention of all violators,” which signifies mandatory detention) in practice.

Length of detention. There is no maximum limit to the duration of administrative immigration detention. Immigration officials can issue a detention order for an initial period of 30 days when there is “reasonable grounds to believe that a suspect falls under any of the items of Article 24.” This can be extended for an additional 30 days (ICRRA Arts. 39, 41). Once a deportation order is issued, there is no limit on the amount of time a person can remain in detention. The detainee may be held “until such time as deportation becomes possible” (ICRRA Article 52.5).

Most of the detainees challenged the deportation. In this case:

Challenging detention and deportation.The detainee can request a hearing with a Special Inquiry Officer (ICRRA Art. 48). If he or she does not agree with the findings of the Special Inquiry Officer an objection can then be filed with the Minister of Justice (ICRRA Art. 49). When for whatever reason the detainee cannot be immediately deported, he or she may be detained or continue to be held “until such time as deportation becomes possible” (ICRRA Art. 52.5). If it is found that the person is not deportable the director of the centre can release him or her under certain conditions (ICRRA Art. 52.6).

Before 2005, Japan opened its doors to all foreigners. There were little less than 2 million foreigner who came here as a tourists and overstayed their visas. (excluding those with Japanese lineage) We had a very lax laws with regards to foreigners living in Japan. Many English conversation teachers even apply for jobs on tourists visas and then request for a change of status after 3 months. You could hardly hear the word ALTeachers those days. Many foreigners came to work for services, entertainment and constructions sectors. 90% of total visitors overstayed their visas yet, they were not even questioned by the authorities. They mingled in the society just like any local residents. But instead of gratitude, some sorted to high crimes such as murders and robberies. (many were cold cases because the suspects had fled the county) Yes, we do have crimes too but it's a crime of Japanese against fellow Japanese and not foreigners against Japanese. There is a clear distinction here. Don't blame the Japanese government for revising and implementing a stricter rule.

Now for those who criticizes Japan yet who chose to stay, what do you think would be the reactions of your own government in such a case? I know what Trump tries to do with the illegals, and I know the primary purpose of Brexiit too. Do I need to go further?

-2 ( +9 / -11 )

Japan doesn't have the responsibility to fix issues in other countries or to accept people with no skills, no way to get training, no way to live on their own work and no way to fund any startup costs.

I'm jealous of Japan's illegal immigration policy as an American. Wish the USA was the same. Sensible.

0 ( +10 / -10 )

just let them all stay. Just let anyone be anywhere they want to be anytime they want. A border is just a line on a map!

thats what liberal world seems to be coming to.

I also wish other countries would adopt Japans immigration system.

0 ( +10 / -10 )

Deportation should be the solution.

Problem is those people are fighting it, meaning the cost if deporting them by force is very high (police officers needed, specific transportation , etc).

No country should accept unwanted immigration (this principle of being nice to people who do illegal things is "killing" mine).

And no, it is not a matter of cost, the illegal imligrant could pay a flight to Japan and that was not 100yens to start with.

If you flee for your life, you take the closest neighouring country.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

The immigration bureau has refused to comment on the reported hunger strike, saying that "there are no situations that need to be made public."

Then Japan is not an open, honest, 21st century, accountable democracy.

, have been held at the facility for over two years,

Two years! Is there something wrong with the tribunal system. Speed the system up.

The Justice Ministry points to detention as being a way to keep tabs on foreigners who are in Japan without legal status, 

Maybe so, but lack of medical care and lengthy detention is disgrace. Japan signed up to the UN convention for Refugees. If Japan can't deal with it, why did Japan sign up for it.

4 ( +13 / -9 )

Why on earth would someone be kept in a detention center for that period of time? Either release them, turn them over to embassy staff, or put them on a flight home.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

"If Japan can't deal with it, why did Japan sign up for it." Window dressing - Japan signs all manner of UN agreements with no intention of changing domestic legislation so that they can be enforced - and the UN tolerates it.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

There is no forced feeding. Detainees have to pay for their own deport flight.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

@ JJJetplane

Long detention times for people you are going to deport makes no sense. At this point you are prolonging the waste of taxpayer money.

At all !!! Unless you are a beneficiary of the system.

For, it's only those who have mastered the art of evil that know how to profit from it.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Have read all your posts. I was held in that Osaka detention center for 53 days. Police arrested me voluntarily assisting a film crew from Canada as a translator in Taiji, Wakayama-ken. They were making a doco about dolphin slaughtering.According to rules even volunteering requires a work visa apparently.

I only had a visitor visa but had lived in Japan about 10 years at various times. I eventually learned that if I got a guarantor and paid about 3 million yen bail I could get out. There were about 40 guys in my part of the center. Only 2-3 were asylum seekers. No windows or heaters it was freaking cold.

I met guys from about 20 different countries. Food and medical care was really bad. No internet allowed.

Avoid if possible!

16 ( +18 / -2 )

Give them rubber boat ,drop em in international waters and let em sail to their freedom ( or laternatively they can pay for their ticket home ) . It was repeatedly explained to them that nobody wants them there and they are in country illegally ., why is it so hard to take a hint and take a hike.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

Avoid if possible, avoid any interaction with authorities you will never win. Barbaric Medieval system. Smile, bow and run.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

@ expat

Why on earth would someone be kept in a detention center for that period of time? Either release them, turn them over to embassy 

you'd think this is the sensible thing to do. But , promptly deport them and risk seeing the whole evil tower of babel come tumbling down in a heap. In this case, efficiency has no profits, many jobs will be lost and no scapegoat piñata.

I'm afraid many of the detainees are from some backwater/ banana reps. The embassies are silenced by hook but , I suspect, mostly by crook. That they're not livid about the mal- treatment of their own kin points to willful connivance and dereliction of duty, as protection and seeing legal representation of their citizens is ranked up there in their mandate. You'll be surprised, they're really cheap

1 ( +3 / -2 )

just let them all stay. Just let anyone be anywhere they want to be anytime they want. A border is just a line on a map!

thats what liberal world seems to be coming to. 

No.

I also wish other countries would adopt Japans immigration system.

Yeah, would t it be great if other countries started abusing people's human rights? You must love the cages Donny had built given your proclivity for dehumanizing other humans.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Detainees have to pay for their own deport flight.

Deportees are not required to finance their own ticket out of Japan. They are allowed to purchase their own ticket if they decide to leave Japan voluntarily before the deportation process has run its course, but once a deportation order has been signed, and all appeals have been exhausted, and the destination country has agreed to accept the deportee, they will be put on the earliest available flight at taxpayer expense. In cases where a person has been denied entry into Japan, the airline that brought them is responsible for taking them back.

http://www.immi-moj.go.jp/tetuduki/taikyo/reisyo.html

4 ( +4 / -0 )

oh ,and please give their meals to homeless, they actually deserve the food ( since they actually are citizens of the country ) , in fact anyone on immigration appeal , detained or not should be sponsoring their own stay.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Then Japan is not an open, honest, 21st century, accountable democracy.

, have been held at the facility for over two years,

Two years! Is there something wrong with the tribunal system. Speed the system up.

Grounds for deportation. Article 24 of ICRRA contains a detailed list of persons subject to expulsion from the country. These include persons who have: (1) entered irregularly or overstayed their visas; (2) committed certain crimes; (3) forged documents; (4) been involved in unauthorized income-generating activities; (5) been in involved in migrant trafficking; or (6) been suspected of terrorist activities.

Criminalization. Article 70 of ICCRA provides criminal punishments for violations of a number of immigration related provisions, including illegal entry and overstaying. Punishments include up to three years imprisonment and/or a fine up to JPY3,000,000 (USD 32,000) (ICRRA Art. 70). Officially recognized refugees and asylum-seekers who declared asylum immediately after the entrance or expiration of the permitted period of stay, are exempt from these penalties (ICRRA Art. 70-2).

Grounds for detention and mandatory detention. Article 39 provides that an immigration control officer may detain non-nationals suspected of falling into one of the categories outlined in Article 24. Officials of the Immigration Bureau are generally responsible for initiating deportation procedures and issuing detention orders. Although the law makes detention decisions discretionary, the Japanese government and Immigration Bureau apply the principle of Zenken-Shuyo Shugi(literal translation is “detention of all violators,” which signifies mandatory detention) in practice.

Length of detention. There is no maximum limit to the duration of administrative immigration detention. Immigration officials can issue a detention order for an initial period of 30 days when there is “reasonable grounds to believe that a suspect falls under any of the items of Article 24.” This can be extended for an additional 30 days (ICRRA Arts. 39, 41). Once a deportation order is issued, there is no limit on the amount of time a person can remain in detention. The detainee may be held “until such time as deportation becomes possible” (ICRRA Article 52.5).

The detention orders are issued on some or all of the detainees because (read) Grounds for deportation. They are already guilty of overstaying their visas. (or maybe) entered illegally and involved in unauthorized income-generating activities. That's the least they did already. Now, with regards to the Length of detention, Immigration officials can issue a detention order for an initial period of 30 days when there is “reasonable grounds to believe that a suspect falls under any of the items of Article 24.” Overstayed foreign residents were encouraged to appear at the regional immigration bureaus voluntarily, however, those who were apprehended were being criminalized (read) Criminalization. **

have been held at the facility for over two years,*

> Two years! Is there something wrong with the tribunal system. Speed the system up.

This may give you a slight idea as to why some of them are being held for over 2 years.

Immigration law is a LAW and not a RULE. You break a rule and you end up paying a fine, you break a law and you either go to jail, pay a fine or both. When we come to your country, we abide you laws, as courtesy, we expect the same. What is hard on that?

Maybe so, but lack of medical care and lengthy detention is disgrace. Japan signed up to the UN convention for Refugees. If Japan can't deal with it, why did Japan sign up for it.

They are neither Refugees nor Asylum seekers. They are law breakers. Asylum seekers can be detained during proceedings as provided by Articles 39–43 of the ICRRA. However, in certain cases asylum seekers may be entitled to a temporary permit (ICRRA Article 61-2-4). State-sponsored legal aid is not available to asylum seekers.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

Considering the low numbers of detainees the detention and deport period should be complete in six months.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Detention centers are liken to a prison cell only it is not stricter. They are given adequate food and medical assistance just to meet their needs. Needless to say not comfortably enough to discourage them not to break the immigration law. This maybe the reason behind why there are few detainees.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

You all still seem to think that the guys in the immigration detention center are asylum seekers. About 5-10 % of them are.

There are literally dozens of ways to end up there. There are guys who have their wife leave them and are trying to stay in Japan to see their kids, students who write theses and then get their visa sponsorship cancelled so their Japanese professor can claim credit for their work. Guys who have been in Japan for 40 years without a working visa all kinds of reasons. While I was in there about 100 guys came and went and I think 3 or 4 were asylum seekers.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

@

michaelqtoddToday  03:35 pm JST

michaelqtoddToday  06:58 pm JST

Sorry to know what you've been thru, but thanks for sharing us your experience. Some of us needs to know the first hand knowledge of what is happening inside the detention centers. Very informative.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

If the detainees can be deported, then why does it take the government so long to move them out?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Many are asking why they are being detained for that long. Is actually complicated. Is mainly because of the UN policies. As a member Japan is forced to accept these people, but also cannot just deport them. According to the treaty, the immigrants can willingly leave Japan. So Japan came with the solution of stalling. Japan will keep them from truly integrating in Japan society and have them detain, hoping they get sick of it and leave the country on their own. Japan provide a temporarily shelter for them, but is mostly hoping they just willingly leave. Mostly they are just hoping the detainees break a rule so they can deport them or they leave on their own. Don't expect things to change anytime soon. Getting fed and a place to stay is the best Japan will offer them. If they want freedom and more option in living standards, they gonna have to look elsewhere. Many want to enter Japan thinking is gonna be a Paradise, but what's the point of trying to enter a country when the country does not want you. Hunger strikes isn't gonna help them.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

lord, the lack of empathy in this comment section is depressing. is it nice to live in such a black and white world, where all laws are fair and just, and all people are either good or evil? I guess it must make things more simple, especially something as complicated as immigration.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Again, there is little logic, reason or commonsense in these detentions other than the (ab) use of power on the powerless detainees ( a common phenomena in Japan). Any objectionable queries are deemed as an affront to its ( J's ) sovereignty.

Japan only kicks people when they are down.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

What a messy situation. I do really feel for those trying to leave nations mired in poverty, civil war, etc and attempting to gain asylum in economically advanced and stable countries like Japan. But considering that any attempt to get asylum in Japan is doomed to failure and they're more likely to end up in jail and deported I'd say it's not worth the risk. Try the EU or the US instead.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Advanced nations just can't freely accept every person from struggling countries who would love to enter. Open borders will lead to chaos. You've got to have an orderly immigration system that is respected but mixed with an acceptable level of compassion. From what I understand Australia and NZ are good examples of this.

At the same time advanced nations ought to show much more concern for struggling nations and give more practical aid to help them improve.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Why locking then for a very long time. Why not sending back to their homeland, if they don't have money for their tickets, then give them a temporarily job to work for their tickets?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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