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12-year-old boy jumps to death in Nagoya subway; leaves suicide note

105 Comments

The Nagoya Board of Education on Monday began an investigation into the death of a 12-year-old boy who jumped to his death in front of a train at a Nagoya subway station on Sunday.

A suicide note was found in the boy's desk at home, in which he said he had been bullied at school, Fuji TV reported.

According to police, the boy jumped in front of a train at Shonai-dori Station on the Tsurumai line in Nishi Ward at around 4 p.m. Sunday. He was taken to hospital where he was pronounced dead about 90 minutes later.

The education board said the boy's family found a note in their son's desk at home. In the note, the boy wrote that he was being bullied at school and at school club activities. He said other boys kept telling him he was weak. He said that he couldn't stand it anymore and intended to kill himself.

The boy was a member of the school table tennis club.

The school said that the boy had not been absent and that he had filled out a questionnaire on bullying at school and never said anything about being bullied.

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105 Comments
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You have a deep-seated problem with your society, Japan. Wake up and do something already.

36 ( +43 / -8 )

RIP young man. Rot on earth scum bullies.

26 ( +27 / -1 )

the "outside" world can be a hell on earth sometimes (or most of times) leaving you feeling lucky to live in such a safe country, but dozens of children jumping to their death surely isn't a trace of a healthy, normal society.

11 ( +16 / -6 )

You have a deep-seated problem with your society, Japan. Wake up and do something already.

Sadly, that is simply not the way Japanese society works. They are happier tackling all of the issues that surround the problem - like erecting barriers at stations to prevent the jumpers - than to actually tackle the problem itself. It is easier for the Japanese to sweep it all under the carpet than to confront some unpleasant truths. A zero tolerance attitude to bullying in schools would be a start. One proven instance of bullying and your kid is expelled. See how quickly parents clean house then. Never, ever gonna happen...

26 ( +32 / -6 )

This is terrible news. It looks like the almighty questionnaire is not enough to prevent bullying. maybe treating people like numbers and statistics is why they become numbers and statistics too soon.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Our school "requires" students' and teachers' names on all school questionnaires. I'm sure many/most schools in Japan do the same thing. I leave my name off, but I've never seen a questionnaire without a name so it's easy to see who left their name off.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

What is the point bully's expelled at school, when your child will grown up will be bullying at work? Or friends, or classmates? You can't protect you children all your life, If they don't know the tools to defend their self mentally, emotionally and physically? It's sad this young kid have so much future and I'm not condemn the acting of bullying that's dead wrong! But if you parents don't teach your child be a man or woman who will? As parent is your responsible teach them the real world out there. That's your reparability as parent be tutor, mentor and teacher. Self defense isn't only for bullying if someone want rape your daughter late night in the street back to work at least she will kick the ass of her aggressor or if you son will be assaulted at least he will give a lesson of the delinquent. What is the origin of the quote - Give a man a fish and he eats for a day teach a man to fish and he can feed himself for life? "Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime" by Anne Isabella Ritchie

-1 ( +9 / -11 )

The school said that the boy had not been absent and that he had filled out a questionnaire on bullying at school and never said anything about being bullied.

No doubt more facts will emerge in the coming days regarding the boy's treatment at school. However, in the meantime, I will echo the sentiments of some of the other readers as it relates to "questionnaires".

Questionnaires are such a dangerous thing. Not because they don't have their place, but let's face it, people are not always honest on questionnaires. Least of all kids. No doubt it is just such a bothersome thing. And, of course, so very impersonal. Why would any kid admit to being bullied on a questionnaire that is just handed into the teacher?! No doubt many would see it as a "check the box" exercise which the school really doesn't care about and that would probably cause them (the student) more hassle than anything else.

And, of course, many schools undoubtedly use the questionnaire as their SOLE mechanism for looking for bullying. And, of course, if no children report bullying on a questionnaire, then they can say "hey, we asked, but nobody complained about bullying". That is known as "covering your rear end" in case something happens.

Bullying is insidious and it requires careful attention by all adults involved. Unfortunately, this is troublesome and burdensome, so it is no surprise that many schools just don't do it well. And, of course, let's not forget the teachers themselves that might be involved in bullying "weak" students.

In any event, RIP young lad. I am sorry that this world seemed to let you down. My condolences to his family.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

He said other boys kept telling him he was weak. He said that he couldn’t stand it anymore and intended to kill himself.

The pendulum is swinging way far in one direction here and educators NEED to be taught how to deal with problems like this in a more timely manner. Recognition of a problem, is the FIRST step, and teachers here are ill prepared to understand and deal with children who they themselves do not know what to do.

The "group" mentality is literally killing people here and society refuses to acknowledge that "IT" is a major part of the problem, from the PM down to the nursery school teacher and parents too!

Everyone copies everyone else, and when one, especially a teenager, does not feel a part of the group, they look for ways to get out, and suicide is sadly their only perceived option, particularly when teachers often lay the blame on "them" for not adjusting to the group.

Sadly this will NEVER end until everyone realizes they are a part of the problem and solution as well. This "oh how sad" hand wringing and teeth sucking, but it's not "our" fault thinking JUST HAS TO STOP!

7 ( +8 / -2 )

To be bullied and told you are weak at table tennis is sort of a joke in itself. It is not the most manly or muscle building sport.

This poor kid needed an ear but no one gave it to him. RIP

3 ( +5 / -3 )

The school said that the boy had not been absent and that he had filled out a questionnaire on bullying at school and never said anything about being bullied.

I find it hard to believe that noone knew anything.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Of course I feel awful that a 12 year old offed himself but the large number of kids ending their own lives is also a symptom of weakness on the part of the bullied, too.

I've witnessed and had been bullied in Japan since back in the early 70s and it wasn't any easier back then, I'm sure. In fact, it was probably worse. Then I was bullied in the US. But the thought of suicide never entered my mind.

The idea of switching schools, dropping out or talking to my parents/teachers about it first entered my mind. Ending my own life, even back when I was in elementary/JHS seemed absolutely stupid.

Drop out. Fight back. Get revenge. Get home schooled. Leave. Whatever, but just keep on living.

4 ( +8 / -5 )

Typical of the attitude here. Group mentality. If you aren't in the group you are immediately targeted by those who are. Usually led by some show-off bigger lad, surrounded by sniveling sycophants, who are only happy it's not them being bullied so keep up the torment.

"weak" they say….they are all weak. And they know who they are as they come to terms with what their actions have done.

Parents must be feeling it bad now. I grieve for them. As for the tormentors…One day this will return to their conscience. Perhaps when they are parents themselves with kids at school.

I pity them.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

It's hard enough being a kid. I can be almost unbearable when the pack pursue you. As usual when this happens, a shake my head in despair when some teacher (or local government official) says "we didn't know" or "the child didn't say anything." Such an attitude can only be described as "shirking responsibility" or (more brutually) "trying to weasel your way out." It truly disgusts me. Leadership and responsibility are interwinned.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I remember watching an NHK documentary about a 14 year old boy who killed himself over bullying and it was truly a sobering experience.

It was chilling in many ways, perhaps the most disturbing part was a study that shows that children are less prone to try and stop acts of bullying as they grow older. So while in elementary school quite a few will try and put an end to it, over 90% of high schoolers will just turn a blind eye. And it is obvious that these kids will not stop their ways once they enter society, they are likely to become adults who will inforce the cycle of abuse all over again as soon as they are able.

Japan most definitely has a problem with this and South Korea is even worse, with the highest suicide rate in the whole OCDE.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

a shake my head in despair when some teacher (or local government official) says "we didn't know" or "the child didn't say anything."

Out of curiosity, if they don't actually know anything, what should they say?

0 ( +5 / -6 )

...Guessing that the parents of the bullies think atht their kids did "nothing wrong"...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

This is really sad, but calling this a "deep rooted Japanese problem" seems hypocritical to me. Bullying is different in the west, but definitely not lighter or not as much of a problem... At least it wasn't when I was in grade and high school 10-15 years ago.

0 ( +1 / -2 )

@strangerland

Out of curiosity, if they don't actually know anything, what should they say?

What a strange thing to ask???

The point he was making is they probably did know but like many other schools did nothing. Believe me…I had a kid even approach me as she was so desperate. I reported it but heard nothing more on the matter.

I guess its the whole "nail that sticks up…." attitude.

0 ( +4 / -5 )

Really terrible thing to hear about, his family has my sympathy.

The fact that the school's bullying policy seems to consist of asking students to fill in a questionnaire really raises a question of how seriously they were taking the issue. Sounds like a "cover your as-" approach that wouldn't have revealed much useful information about bullying.

Of course I am not sure if that was all their policy consisted of, but their reaction of "well, he didn't mention it in the questionnaire" just sounds very weak.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The point he was making is they probably did know but like many other schools did nothing.

But what if they don't know? What exactly are they supposed to say?

0 ( +5 / -6 )

life was taken means this is serious problem, and the kid left a note seems to be honest enough to reveal his small world that has been unseen by no others but himself. is it compulsory here for all kids to attend sport clubs? how about making it optional for those who just don't want to take part. and parents also need to spend some time with their kids and to listen more to their stories.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@Strangerland It's a cliche, a default position. As somebody who has put my kids through school in Japan, I can tell you that these "educators" and "administrators" are all over the parents and the kids until something goes wrong. Then they just through up their hands and don't want to know. Admitting that they screwed up is out of the question.

Based on past cases, what will now happen is that the parents will be forced to launch some form of legal action to get the authorities to admit any blame in this case. It's almost like the old Mito Komon TV series, a sort of highly-scripted, warped morality play in three parts. We've all seen it before and will no doubt see it again. Those who should have been responsible will try and scuttle away like coachroaches exposed by the light. In the end, nobody will take responsibility for this. The kids will skate through the legal system as minors, their parents might give some "atonement" money, but this twelve year old will still be dead. It is a shocking state of affairs that repeats itself again and again like Ground Hog Day. It is all rather despressing.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

The question is still unanswered though. If they didn't know, what should they say if not the cliché?

2 ( +7 / -6 )

Strangerland - common sense and experience might tell you that of course the teachers knew as they see these kids every day for years and often know them and what they are going through better than parents. Bullying is a way of life in Japan and teachers here have the attitude that its just something a kid has to endure.

Its also common sense that teachers and schools will say they didn't know to cover their asses.

-3 ( +4 / -6 )

Yes, but that's not my question is it. My question is that if the school doesn't know, then what should they say?

2 ( +6 / -5 )

If they didn't actually know than they say; "We failed this kid" and resign.  They don't belong in positions of responsibility.

-1 ( +3 / -5 )

This morning's Asahi reported that the deceased boy (RIP) wrote "I was called "so weak" at my club. I could not take it any more so I committed suicide." Last night at karate a very enthusiastic father kept saying things like "weak" and "awful" to his 7 year old daughter, in that mafia grumble that many Japanese can do, with the result that she teared up as she beat the shot out of boys twice her size. At that time I impressed by the power of criticism.

-12 ( +4 / -16 )

timtak - you are impressed with mental abuse. Good for you!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Looks like at least a few of the posters above are bullying each other...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

i blame the parents no matter what.. parents are 100% responsible for children during their school age.. especially up to 12-13 years old..

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

timtak - mental abuse of a 7 year old is not something you should be impressed by

5 ( +10 / -5 )

I think that a lot of fathers, coaches and peers criticise others, resulting in some stellar performances and also alas some suicides. Should criticism be deemed "abuse" and stopped?

-5 ( +7 / -12 )

timtak - If criticism leads to, as you say "Alas, some suicides", what do you think?

6 ( +10 / -4 )

@ Marie-Éve Cyr. What is hypocritical? If your statement were true, I, and others, would say there was a fundamental problem in those other societies too. Just because something happens some other place does it mean we cannot critique Japan? Bullying, wherever it occurs, wounds physically and psychologically, and Japan definitely has a problem with it, in school and in other institutions.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

This whole society is based on a bullying culture that uses intimidation and threats to control others. The high school clubs use a 'sempai' hierarchy to train students. The teachers use intimidation and threats as discipline. Then, they move into the workforce and suffer the same hierarchy of intimidation. Children are taught to not fight back and just accept their place in society. There is also a problem with the way the ages are relegated for school entrance. This kid was only 12, so hoe birthday would have been in the next few months. You have kids that turn 13 on April 1st at the start of the school year and other kids that turn 13 on March 31st in the same class at junior high. Of course it is going to cause problems. In Australia, the school year runs from January to December, but the birthdays run from July to June. This means the kids are closer in age when they start high school giving the, a fairer chance of completing instead of being bullied by the older kids. In Japanese schools you have some kids that barely fit into their uniforms and others that are shaving in the sa,e class. This is the start of the problems.

10 ( +14 / -4 )

@ Clamenza I think that pyramids, cheerleading, rugby, cycling leads to some deaths, which are tragic in the extreme, but I would not ban them, since I think that they promote positives. Likewise I would not ban criticism per se. I do not know the circumstances of this particular case. If the other club members only said "Yowai na" not out of love but as a way of putting the guy down, for instance. I believe that the father at the karate club last night loves his children very much.

This whole society is based on a bullying culture There may be some truth in what you say, but even if it were the case, then I would have more of it, and promote Japanese-style-bullying through out the world since I love Japan the beautiful outcomes that it achieves: happy healthy industrious people who look good and are amazing at Karate. If what you say is true, I would not ban criticism but have more of it. Japan has to be one of the best places to live in the world.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

timtak - banning sports was not the question.

If the mental abuse you are impressed by leads to suicide, and in so many other cases in Japan, a broken relationship with fathers, is it worth it?

2 ( +7 / -5 )

As been bullied by others too ... long ago . I know how it feels like . I only hoped that he had talked to his close friend about it . Then , maybe he could have seeked help . He might have feel ashamed to talk about it to his parents .

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Proper and professional pastoral care of students needs to be imbedded deeply into a school or system and specialised roles need to be created within the organization to facilitate this happening. A school also needs to have a clear and comprehensive bullying policy that EVERYONE involved in school life understands - the Board, the Administrators, the teachers, the students and the parents. A good and effective school should also have effective Co-Curricular programs that build the character, values, sense of social responsibility, empathy, understanding in the students. From my experience, this is what the best schools have and it distinguishes them from ordinary schools.

I don't know a lot about the Japanese education system, but to have a kid being bullied to the point of suicide suggests to me that the system has failed him. Suicide is a final, tragic act of desperation and hopelessness that fixes a problem he can't see being fixed any other way.

That, to my mind, is simply not good enough.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Tend to agree with clamenza here. If the cost of verbal criticism is kids committing suicide or hating their parents for the rest of their life while the only benefit is some marginal and ephemeral improvement in the ability to do some sporting activity, then it's pretty obvious which side one should come down on. I note also that positive encouragement can also reap the same beneficial results if done right - not all of today's pro athletes had abusive coaches or parents as kids.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

@ Clamenza

Banning things that have both positive and negative outcomes was the question. It seems to me that Japan takes a non-idealistic outlook toward many things such as pyramids, violent groups, student-student violence, criticism, and police interrogation techniques. In all cases, things that have negative aspects but are nonetheless believed to result in positive outcomes overall are, not banned. I think that taking a more general view of things and evaluating them as a whole is a very difficult but extremely sensible thing to do, which results in the wonderful society in which I live. I would of course ban "abuse" (by definition) but I would not ban things which have negative aspects but are good overall, such as criticism. If it were demonstrated on the other hand that any of these things were demonstrated to result in a negative outcome overall, then I would want them to be banned. Violence, criticism and other non-optimals have a place in an imperfect world. Idealism, imho, does not.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

Anyway there is something that need to be recognized, there are people that mentally unstable or weak, that any could be a good reason to kill himself. I remember when I was in school that bulling was common, but no one killed himself, and most of them learned how to face it with honor and courage. What is failing here is not the institutions but the culture.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

timtak - theres a whole area between the POS father you were so impressed by, and banning criticism altogether, that you ignore. Its called a common sense middle ground.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

very sad. imagine the pain and loneliness he felt every day. the ugly side of human being - being an adult, i sometime even want to run away into my imaginary world rip .

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Very saddening. How come the bullying comes from club activities? Isn't any adult supervises any school activities? And that adult shld have been wary of inert ways of bullying? And yes I believe there are emotionally and mentally weak persons made more os by the culture of saying gomen nasai even if at fault is the other party.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Just because something happens some other place does it mean we cannot critique Japan? Bullying, wherever it occurs, wounds physically and psychologically, and Japan definitely has a problem with it, in school and in other institutions.

and that is what you should have said coming out of the gate. I swear some people get on here and blame an entire country as if the rest of the World is non-existent.

1 ( +1 / -1 )

Rip, when I was a kid I was bullied, then when I ran into a girl from school when I was a adult I found out I was bulling her...strange as it is its a crazy cicle....

RIP, hope he found peace.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@Geoff Gillespie

I hear your point but when bullying is a deeply ingrained part of society and is view as a was of toughening kids up and a general habit in such a hierarchical society where no one ever steps up to the plate as it is viewed a disturbing the balance, where can one start?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What is failing here is not the institutions but the culture.

I hope you mean the culture of the table tennis club, in which case I would agree.

Clamenza wrote

timtak - theres a whole area between the POS father you were so impressed by, and banning criticism altogether, that you ignore. Its called a common sense middle ground.

In addition to tending to attempt to remove all negatives, such as criticism, irrespective of their overall impact, another downside to idealism - or perhaps rather 'judging things using language' - is imho, that it can promote a sense that is common or middling, when there is more room for variety. The father in question is one of the most dedicated and loving that I have met, whose children appear, overall happy, healthy and amazing at karate. I am all for good sense, that may not be common.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

This story is a rushed, half-written version.Grandma,sensing something was strange,went to the boy's room and found the suicide note.She called the father up,who called his son, who told him it was just a joke and nothing serious.Not long after he killed himself.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

The problem is that society does not recognize the rights of the individual. The US is not much better. We have a wretched society, which tramples freedom and creativity. What is needed is courageous individuals willing to stand up for themselves and others. As long as the world is filled with cowards, people will see their rights destroyed by others.

The US does this as well, but it is on a larger scale. In Japan it is bullying, in the US it is cops killing people in the street. Which is worse? It all comes down to people not speaking out when they see this kind of thing.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Out of curiosity, if they don't actually know anything, what should they say?

If the teachers and the BOE were doing their jobs this may not have occurred at all! The response is the "head in the sand" "We didn't know" attitude that bullying doesnt occur in "our" school's, it's somewhere else's problem to deal with.

THAT is a huge part of the problem, it is a system wide, country-wide problem. EVERYONE involved in education should be aware and trained how to identify children like this. Sadly some will be missed, but every freaking time this happens (all to often) everyone plays the "I didn't know" game.

More like "I didnt WANT to know" "I want to run away and hide" and let others deal with it.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

If the teachers and the BOE were doing their jobs this may not have occurred at all!

That wasn't my question though.

And Clamenza actually came up with what I thought would be an appropriate answer if they didn't actually know. Even if they did for that matter.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

What kind of believe exists in Japan that encourages people to take their own lives, and in such an incredibly painful way?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I don't believe an principle who say's they didn't know a student was suicidal. Take a look around any classroom and you can take a good guess at which kids could be at risk. Jeezs…I see them once a week and even I can tell the social outcasts in class.

Many teachers are PT so they don't care or don't want to get involved. The full timers are either too burned out or simply can't be bothered reporting unusual behavior.

Everyone is clock watching for when we can all go home. Seriously…there is a queue of folk waiting to clock off. Does that show commitment?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Bullying again... so sad. I am glad I spend a fortune to send my kids to intl schools. At least we bypassed that problem completely.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

https://www.bing.com/search?q=how+to+stop+being+bullied+at+school&pc=MOZI&form=MOZTSB

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

bully are part of life. THey will never go away. Old strategies don,t work ( retaliation ) in todays world. So new strategies are needed. MOst Bullies have parent who are bullies. Most Sensei all know this and had conflict these bully Parents. This occur when the bully is sent home and Parent are straight up at the school demanding to see the Sensei and always in a confronting way. Hence the head in the sand. I think the time has come to give the school some sort policing powers. Like having a able person stationed at the school who can legally arrest the bully or the Bully Parent until the police get their. Both the bully and the Parent should be made to take a Anger Management program at their own cost. Also I would allow better law for the bullied person to sue the bullies Parents for compensation.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

"bullied at... school club activities...table tennis club"

Yes, that bastion of male machismo!! If there is anything that sums up just how WEAK and PATHETIC a Japanese bully is then it is this. Bullying at the TABLE-TENNIS CLUB!!!

One word... Judo!!!

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Many people who have survived bullying ...or who are in a bullying environment..simply..do not recognise, or acknowledge that experience for what it is. Bullying..in all its disguises,is abuse. Criticism that is constructive and results in 'improvement'...is not the same process. It is based in respect and love/care for the 'pupil'..or whoever is being 'critiqued'...and NOT.in any attempt to force a required response...for some other reason A parent who induces a child to perform in a required way...by destructive criticism..is not offering constructive criticism...but is likely to be more concerned with ownself image...for example...A child nagged to do well in school..may produce similar results...at least temporarily...to one who is beaten and orridiculed...but his/herreasons for trying hard and attaining therequired

0 ( +1 / -1 )

To criticize a child doesn't help them at all, you make them weak and resentful and make them withdraw and cut the bridge between them and yourself. I believe as long as a parent encourages and reminds a child they are loved and supported then the child will have the strength and courage to deal with bullies. the child will feel they have the needed back-up and would be willing to confide in the parent. Resiliency should be paramount to give to a child, if they don't know how to handle school age bulling how will they handle these issues as an adult.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

When I was in High School, One kid tried to start bullying me. I told my parents who immediately enrolled me in the local boxing club. Wonderful for your confidence and of course, it's great for self defence. 16 years later, I'm still into boxing!

2 ( +3 / -2 )

Poor baby. I wish he had hung on, but it must have felt like too much for him.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I know this subway. I'm from Yagoto near the University of Nagoya.

That's problem is not about the security of the subway (look at The Big Apple sub). It's only a question of education. People has to learn from school to not bully the others because if you will be bullied by some kind of people. You will meet the pain.

But if you meet this problem, dont be weak, dont listen them but be strong. But dont use the violence because the violence brought everything (even death or suicid).

This boy knows about the society (even his family) can help him. But it seems he wanted some kind of revenge by using death to make some trouble. In Japan, you can find a lot of manga speaking about death, suicid or revenge.

I think he only want to commit suicid to show something.

"I am weak so death is the last solution"

This boy was sick mentally because he didn't want the help from his family.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@Kentaro BT - "he wanted some kind of revenge by using death to make some trouble"

Welcome to Japan everyone!!! :-)

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

@speed, way above: well said!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Sadly, the system failed this 12 year boy. When I was in elementary and high school, I was bullied both in school and outside of the school grounds but I wouldn't keep quiet and was not afraid to tell. Some did nothing and they hopefully will have to deal with Karma but those that did help put an end to those bullies' reign of terror. Maybe if Japan got its head out of the sand long enough to see there is a problem, they could start to do something real about it.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

And the teachers dont have some formation about direct the children (they are not psychologists but teachers).

"Do the right thing my child"

A teacher cannot give their own idea (about helping a child) because if there will be an incident, the fault will come from the teacher not the child.

And the law in Japan is not joking about that.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

This is why JR East in the Tokyo area and the private rail lines in Tokyo are installing platform doors at most stations. The delay in trying to get into the tracks due to these barriers may be enough for station security and/or a helpful bystander to stop someone from attempting what happened in this article--and such acts are unfortunately a major problem in the Tokyo area.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Not only Tokyo but the others city.

Nagoya have some subway line with platform doors but few line (like tsurumai line) dont have this.

But I listen in Nagoya News, they will try to install the platform doors at most stations (it will take one year or more).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How do you outreach to save young beautiful lives with a "survey" AND expect a 12 year old to admit to being bullied. When will teachers take charge of the studying/working environment and develope a bit of peripheral vision? This is so avoidable... soooo sad

2 ( +2 / -0 )

What kind of believe exists in Japan that encourages people to take their own lives, and in such an incredibly painful way?

@igloobuyer You should be asking instead, what kind of "believe" (sic) exists in South Korea, which has the highest suicide rate in the world.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/world/suiciderate.html

At any rate, another tragic loss of life. This senpai/kouhai, gaman, shouganai, etc. facets of the culture really need to be tossed out as they do more harm than good. The problem is that It seems most Japanese don't see anything wrong with them or how counterproductive or even destructive they are. How many more suicides before some major mindset change occurs? I'm afraid things will just be business as usual. Unfortunate.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Bullying is a way of life in Japan. Sad to say, bullying comes from the rank and files to the lowest new comer at the office!!! SADD!!!!!!!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@misunderstood - "bullying comes from the rank and files to the lowest new comer at the office!!!"

And in the family, from the elderly grandparents to the NEW-BORN CHILD... :-(

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Ping-Pong! A 12-year-old boy goes under a train for sake of PING-PONG!!

I'm getting angry now!!! :-(

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

School officials have to keep eyes on PE teachers and other sport clubs members and coaches. If all students have to join a sport club, students who are not athletics usually choose ping pong club which they are comfortable with other tender students. But PE teacher usually degrade nice kids and that encourade more athletic students to bully them.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

@toshiko - "PE teacher usually degrade nice kids and... bully them"

Thank you. Your wise words always calm me down.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Here is the documentary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNRwCcLjo3I

Speaking about the teachers and their role, in this documentary no-one addresses that. It surprised me greatly, from the best friend of the victim to the victim's parents, they all seemed to think that dialogue between the kids is the key to keeping bullying from snowballing into suicide. But given how pernacious bullies are and how authority figures tolerate- if not actively promote- the cycle of abuse, such a naive solution is not likely to go anywhere.

It is true that bullying occurs a bit all over but there is a crucial difference in a society that does not give the children any protection at all. Japanese kids who complain to teachers (and they rarely do) are often told that if they are bullied it is their fault for not fitting in. So the school itself is reinforcing the bullies which makes for added pressue. No wonder so many young people cannot take it.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Well I feel bad for this boy I don't think bullying is the problem. Every country has it and most people experience it at some point in their lives . Raise your child to be strong enough to deal with it or raise them communicative enough to talk to you about it . This idea from the west that all bullying must be stopped and reported is ridiculous and never going to change anything . Children in all countries will kill themselves occasionally for various reasons and all you can do is teach them to have emotional strength .

1 ( +3 / -3 )

@Nocturnalux - "the school itself is reinforcing the bullies"

I AM hearing you...

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

IT just so happens I'm at the Web-Summit in Dublin and came across this

http://staudoens.ie/bullybug-unveiling-at-the-web-summit-2015/

http://www.bullybug.org/

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Christine Loughead - "I don't think bullying is the problem... This idea... that all bullying must be stopped... is ridiculous"

Thanks for the input! I guess you must be a TEACHER!!!! ;-)

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Stand up for yourself or be bullied, it's as simple as that.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

When will one of these poor kids become the poster child for this epedemic of bullying that goes in here? Stop HIDING the victim and shout out who this boy was, his life, his story his face for all to see and realize that this is a REAL thing and it is HAPENNING ALL THE TIME.

He wasn't a special boy, he wasn't a weak boy, he was a young boy with a family who loved him no doubt.

He was a normal boy who was born, made friends, had experiences, ate food, was happy and sad, cried, had fun, talk with his mom and dad maube siblings? Maybe had bedtime stories read to him at night by loving parents.

And now, because of this blight on society, this shameful and ignored cancer of bullying, another sweet child no longer exists.

Worst thing is, it could have been prevented.

I'm so sorry little one. I couldn't do anything either.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

As many have pointed out, bullying exists everywhere. Being 12 and thinking that suicide is the answer is something that doesnt exist everywhere. I am guessing the same thing exists in Korea (since it has the highest suicide rate), but in general, suicide is not seen as such a bad thing here - perhaps it is something from the old times where seppuku was performed to atone for mistakes, or perhaps it is the fact that in the west (where Christianity is main) suicide is considered a sin.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

@crustpunker, to be honest I dont think that boy were a normal boy.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Bullying today to totally different since the internet started. Bulling today is centred on attacking the victim both Emotionally, socially and with violence. Where before violence was the prime weapon used. The old strategy of standing up to the bully physically like talking lesson in self-defence will not have the same outcome today. I had also said to people that say that kid have it so easy today compared to when i was a child is bull- %^%$. Growing up in today society has more intense peer pressure like us older ones have never experience when we were growing up. THis seem to be the problem at school. Because the Sensei has never experience today bulling and have no experience in detecting it nor trained to detect it or how to deal with it correctly. The same can be said about the majority of todays parents. If the child is being bully on the internet and tells their Parents the standard response is Don,t Used the Internet. Todays children social live revolves mainly around the internet so the children is in fear of not being able to access the internet if tell of the online bullying. It would be less of a problem if both parties stop living in the pass and get educated on these bulling problem of today.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The way to work against this problem is bringing your sons up with enough tools to overcome the natural evil in the world.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Bulling today is centred on attacking the victim both Emotionally, socially and with violence. Where before violence was the prime weapon used.

I'm not sure where you got this theory from, but it's incorrect. I remember social and emotional bullying when I was in elementary school, and the one time I was a victim of bullying in high school, all three methods were used.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Strangerland: I am referring to per and post internet. I assume you are on the post side of it because of your use of attacking commentaries on this forum to try and belittle any commentator you do not agree with very, is much akin to online bulling. E.G "I'm not sure where you got this theory from, but it's incorrect". A "Sorry Johnsan I do not agree" would be more appropriate but you have this need to make it personal.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Strangerland: I am referring to per and post internet.

No, that's not what you said:

Bullying today to totally different since the internet started. Bulling today is centred on attacking the victim both Emotionally, socially and with violence. Where before violence was the prime weapon used.

your use of attacking commentaries on this forum to try and belittle any commentator you do not agree with very, is much akin to online bulling.

I pointed out that you were incorrect. That's how discussions work. That is not bullying.

"I'm not sure where you got this theory from, but it's incorrect". A "Sorry Johnsan I do not agree" would be more appropriate but you have this need to make it personal.

Neither of the examples you provided makes it personal, and either one is an appropriate impersonal answer.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

@John-San "Old strategies don,t work (retaliation) in today's world".

I disagree. Old strategy works perfectly. It worked with me and now it works with my children. You must know problems of your kids and you must be a leader for them. Put away PC games, tablets, smartphones and other crappy electronic gifts of westernization. Instead of wasting time on screen idiocy, you must offer to your kids some courses of self-defense, boxing, applied karate, kickboxing, KUDO, thekwondo, judo, sambo. After few months, physical culture and regular trainings will give to your children good health, ability to defend themselves, good shape of bodies. Just pay attention to your kids, know their problems.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Even the Emperor's Granddaughter was not spared from bullying at school

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/12/world/asia/12princess.html?_r=0 http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8551868.stm

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yamashi: Thank you for you helpful insight. I did let my children have unlimited access to the internet but they were also involve in netball from 8 to 18 year. They were victim of bullying and dealt with bullying without their mother or my intervention. I hope all children can handle bulling with intervention of parents or Sensei because has I said in my comment Bullying will alway be part of life.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Poor child.. he was just a baby! This is a solemn reminder to parents to never overlook anything. Talk to your children people, as you're the only real friends they have before they step out into the mean world out there. RIP baby boy.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I hate bullying. I dealt with it for three years, from the 8th through to the 10th grades. This story hits close to home, for there were times I wanted to take my own life. GOD give comfort and peace to this young man's family, and may the bullies find justice.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@Jason Lovelace - "GOD give comfort and peace to this young man's family, and may the bullies find justice"

Noted...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Agree with John-san: "Bullying will always be part of life". After finishing school they will be bullied in the company or other places. Do you know some companies have a high suicide rate? This is not a Japan problem, it is everywhere and has always been. Can we stop it? Maybe in isolation, but the best protection against a bully is a nice circle of good friends.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Someone asked the point of identifying bullies in school, since there will be bullying at work and so forth: to identify the bullies and get them help psychologically so they STOP being abusers. To get the bullying kid support so they move on. Stop the bullies when they are young and maybe the workplaces will improve in future with less jobsite bullying. So, yes, identifying and treating/handling bullying in school matters--for the bullied and the bullies, all. No one should have to be driven to the point of wanting to die.

So, really, I hope the bullies end up with a lot of remorse and many nightmares. I hope this haunts them to change.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Bullying will always be part of life

It most likely will, but that doesn't mean that a caring, empathetic, socially responsible community can't take significant measures to educate children that bullying is not acceptable. If you just throw your hands in the air and accept the status quo saying 'Ah, that's the way it is', there is no social progress. No enlightenment.

Bullying takes effort to manage - but it's not just the job of school teachers, it's absolutely everyone's job. Those who think it's just a teacher's job at school are lazy and irresponsible in my opinion. Kids go to school for around 8 hours a day from 24, 200 days a year - about 18% of their time in a year. Where are they for the rest of the time? At home and in the community.

So perhaps that's where the bigger focus needs to be directed to effect changes in attitudes.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

While antiーbullying measures in schools are a good idea in any country, Japanese society is stratified into the in group and those outside the group. Japanese adults themselves act like children bullying those who have less power than themselves. I am not sure if just telling kids not to bully each other when it is structurally condoned within business and interpersonal relationships. When managers are allowed to hit their subordinates, I can see no moral authority to tell children not to say mean things to each other. Any prohibition against bullying in school will mean nothing unless society changes first.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

So many wasted lives just because the government and the board of education are slow in tackling this problem. Give bullies 3 warnings, after that expell them from school. Enforce it as a law and soon the others will take heed to the warning and shape up.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Bullying is a terrible problem in every country, at least in Japan it rarely amounts to direct threats to a child's life, although obviously that's no comfort when it is so severe that it drives a child to suicide. There are huge pressures on children from 12 in Japan, they change schools at that age and many get sent to Juku on top of regular school emphasizing the difficult struggle they are expected to compete in in the future. Parents need to ensure children feel able to speak to them about trouble they are having, and gaining that trust is not something that a parent can achieve by words alone, parents need to build up a history of going to bat for their kids and getting results - sometimes that might mean taking on teachers or changing schools etc... of course not all parents are up to that either and so can't always be blamed. Really schools and teachers are the professionals, they have a responsibility to assume that bullying is going on and be proactive at stamping it out.

Side note: Although it's true there is a tenancy to sweep trouble like this under the carpet in Japan, that tenancy is very much alive and well within schools in the west too. I don't believe there is a special problem in Japanese schools.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@interuni321 - "parents need to build up a history of going to [baseball] bat for their kids and getting results"

Yes, that's the only way. Let everyone know what's going to happen to them if anyone hurts your child.

I think they call them MONSTER PARENTS!!! :-D

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

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