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12-year-old girl killed after lying down on railway tracks

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It's so sad to hear about one so young taking their life in this or any manner. I hope her family can find peace somehow.

15 ( +17 / -2 )

Oh dear. Surely the govt can do more that put up AKB48 posters.

2 ( +11 / -9 )

So very sad. I would guess that there is a fairly high likelihood that this poor little girl's sense of despair had something to do with junior high school entrance exams--given that February is entrance exam season in Japan.

Many 11-12 year-old children here go through intense pressure from parents and 'elite' cram schools, and these kids have only one shot at passing the test to get into the school of their (first) choice. Success in the exam process becomes everything to these poor kids, by proxy of cram school/intense parents. Numerous times I have been at an 'elite' junior high school on the day names of 6th graders who passed the test are listed for all to see. Lots of excitement among those who got in, and lots of devastated children and furious parents among those who don't make the cut. RIP poor little girl.

19 ( +19 / -1 )

there needs to be a place where people can go and talk to someone.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

no one really knows what the circumstances are at this point. Was she bullied? Did she fail a test to get into junior high? too much pressure from mom and dad? I think susieuk hit on it.. there seems to be a lack of places where someone can go and just talk to someone. It doesn't hurt to let out whats on your mind!

15 ( +16 / -1 )

I think this kind of reporting does nothing to help focus on the deeper social and economic causes that brought about the extreme rise in the suicide rate in Japan. Many teens and adults suffer from mental illnesses and depression that goes undiagnosed. There is unrealistic pressures from the media and society. In Japan. The depression is a massively under-diagnosed and many suffer with depression receive no treatment at all. J-goverment continues to look other way.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

Piltdown ManMAR. 01, 2012 - 07:25AM JST

So very sad. I would guess that there is a fairly high likelihood that this poor little girl's sense of despair had something to do with junior high school entrance exams--given that February is entrance exam season in Japan.

Many 11-12 year-old children here go through intense pressure from parents and 'elite' cram schools, and these kids have only one shot at passing the test to get into the school of their (first) choice. Success in the exam process becomes everything to these poor kids, by proxy of cram school/intense parents. Numerous times I have been at an 'elite' junior high school on the day names of 6th graders who passed the test are listed for all to see. Lots of excitement among those who got in, and lots of devastated children and furious parents among those who don't make the cut. RIP poor little girl.

And sadly, Nothing will ever change. Not only the government refuses, the common people refuses as well. Husband at home just confirmed it, suicide is indeed part of Japanese culture. She died in an honorable way and that's how the people will remember her. Unfortunately, she will not be the last. Suicide is not frown upon as some people outside Japan may think. The latest AKB48 poster sham by the government is nothing but a feeble attempt to change something that is unchangeable. The government itself knows this.

That said, the death of a child in this manner, doesn't make sense to me. I don't care wether its their culture or not. So much "shouganai" in this country. The can always come up with the latest LV or Chanel handbag, but when it comes to protect children, it takes 40 study sessions before they can come up with something as shameful as an AKB48 suicide "prevention" poster. With ridiculous moves like this you see where their real priorities lie... (fashion, gourmet food, travel)

-5 ( +12 / -17 )

@Yubaru - I agree with you, but to be honest, I wonder how much her family have contributed to her desperation. When a child is driven to commit suicide it is because they really feel they have no other alternative - including going to Mum & Dad for help.

Sorry if that sounds judgemental, and I realise we dont know all the facts but I see it so often here - parents putting all their own hopes, dreams, failures, expectations on their children.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

sfjp330MAR. 01, 2012 - 08:20AM JST

I think this kind of reporting does nothing to help focus on the deeper social and economic causes that brought about the extreme rise in the suicide rate in Japan. Many teens and adults suffer from mental illnesses and depression that goes undiagnosed. There is unrealistic pressures from the media and society. In Japan. The depression is a massively under-diagnosed and many suffer with depression receive no treatment at all. J-goverment continues to look other way.

You may be demoted from your current position if you inform your "mental illness" at work as you will be considered incompetent and disabled. The Social stigma for mental illnesses here is too great.

-3 ( +9 / -12 )

there needs to be a place where people can go and talk to someone.

There are people available, the problem is identifying and getting assistance for children and adults that need the help.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Took a lot of courage to remain lying on the tracks while watching the train come.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Very sad news to read and think that a 12 year old would need to do this to herself. RIP little girl.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Parents are to blame 100%. If they noticed something was wrong and just ignored it or were too ashamed or afraid or to ask for help, I blame them. If they were too busy to notice, I blame them. If they are the cause of this directly, I blame them. I hope they suffer and good on her for taking revenge on them. Maybe now they will notice! Too little, too late!

10 ( +14 / -4 )

There's one thing consistent with every person that commits suicide. They all firmly believe that this world sucks.

Japan with all of it's social and economic problems is pushing these people to commit suicide. This story is te most demonic I've read on this website.

12 years old laying across the track waiting for a speeding train. That's demonic.

That's not courage. Where's the self-defense mechanism? Self-preservation is instinctive isn't it?

This is a mind blowing story. So much so, it does not compute and I cannot visualize it.

This country desperately needs help.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Husband at home just confirmed it, suicide is indeed part of Japanese culture. She died in an honorable way and that's how the people will remember her.

There is nothing honorable about suicide. Or did you forget about the people who are left behind? With more than 30000 suicides a year, where is a good way to start? Those people who think about committing suicide are very very hard to reach as they have already lost hope and given up

9 ( +11 / -2 )

The social pressure in this country (groups) and what they are doing to teenage girls is sick. AKB vids on youtube got banned in this house months ago (TV is hopeless)... This kid not only took her life in a gruesome way but all on the train and near it will be banged up for awhile too... let alone just reading it. RIP.

-9 ( +2 / -11 )

RIP 12 year-old girl. It seems as though regrettably not even AKB could reach you.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Many people in Japan have never even heard of anyone specializing in depression. The bigger problem in Japan is that a stigma attaches to anyone seen as treating crazy people, and the status of psychiatrists remains very low. Japan's goverment failure to treat depression has deep roots in the country's culture. But no one wants to think they have a mental problem and most doctors say they just don't know anything about that area. When Japanese experience depression, doctors say, they prefer to imagine something is wrong with their character rather than their heads. In a culture of shame, the only thing to do about illnesses of the mind is to hide them. Many still carry a stigma that can haunt families.

In Japan, if you tell a friend, a very straightforward person, that you have depression, most likely friend will warned you not to tell anyone else. They feel they can't let their neighbors know about their condition, and I am certain that if their company knew, they would get the tap on the shoulder. Many have fears that they would be fired if company knew you were depressed. Therapy isn't magic. It can only work if you're willing to try to make changes to the way you think and act and approach things. The crappy thing about depression is that your symptoms get in the way of everyday life which eventually some leads to suicides.

14 ( +16 / -2 )

papigiulioMAR. 01, 2012 - 08:57AM JST

Husband at home just confirmed it, suicide is indeed part of Japanese culture. She died in an honorable way and that's how the people will remember her.

There is nothing honorable about suicide. Or did you forget about the people who are left behind? With more than 30000 suicides a year, where is a good way to start? Those people who think about committing suicide are very very hard to reach as they have already lost hope and given up

Excuse me, are you implying that this is the way I think? You need to re read my post. It is my husband, who is a Japanese national who told me that Suicide is Japanese culture and that is the people of Japan that regards Suicide as an honorable way to go. I do not agree with this, however.

-7 ( +7 / -14 )

RIP

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Up and out of the house at 5am on a bitter cold and snowy morning.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

too sad... guess you guys about your childhood, had you ever thought to commit suicide?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

A person should have the basic human right to decide what they do with their own life to include whether they continue to live or die. There is a large portion of society that gets upset, scandalized and indigent when someone has the audacity to take their own life. These are the same people who want to dictate what the rest of society eats, wears and watches on TV. These people just can’t bear the idea that someone does something that they have no control over. Every human should have the right to die if he or she chooses to do so.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

@papigiulio

There is nothing honorable about suicide

I disagree. I think it depends on the circumstances. But I think this girl was far too young to do it and it is likely that stress was the reason she did it.

I'm seeing a lot of posters commenting about the state of mental health in Japan. How many of you really know somebody who is/was mentally ill? I know a lady who was. She tried to kill her husband. She was instituionalised, then released when she was judged fit to re-enter society. Since then, she has made a very good recovery. Seeing this happened in Japan, I would say that effective mental health measures/facilities exist, at least to some extent. But as I am not a specialist, I don't make a fool of myself in judging it to be very good or very bad. Unless you are a specialist or have done an extensive investigation, I'd recommend you not commenting either.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Every human should have the right to die if he or she chooses to do so.

@Riffraff

To say "every human" is taking it a bit too far. Adults arguably, but that is certainly a right (decision) inappropriate for a 12-year old.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Franchesca Miyara YangMAR. 01, 2012 - 09:14AM JST Not talking to you directly but to the people who think that way :) No offense.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Maybe, just maybe another 12 year old could be prevented from suicide because of something like the AKB48 campaign. Doesn't that make it worth the effort?

12 ( +13 / -1 )

@Franchesca

I think suicide in some circumstances is honourable. But doing it to escape stress is not. While I sympathise with anybody who is stressed from school, work, etc, those people should seek help and not give up until things get better.

In this case though, the poor girl was only 12. I understand it's ridiculous expecting her or any other child to sort their problems out. It's very sad that things went this far. If there is an afterlife or she is reborn, I hope she finds peace.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Gee...9 thumbs down... Jesus, I guess my sociology degree goes out the window. Need to go back to uni...

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

As a father of a 12 year old...I cannot imagine! I am glad that all of my children know that they can speak with my wife or I about anything. We put pressure on them, but help them understand why.

Wow...12 years old...and suicide was not only an option, but chosen.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

One of my best friends commit suicide years ago. It was such a shock to everyone. I felt so sorry for his parents. We grew up together and I still remember that fateful day I got a phone call from my mum telling me he had taken his life. It seemed SO UNREAL. I'm sure it took days for the news to sink in to me.

He had been suffering depression for a while and had been hospitalized on a few occasions. I saw him about two months before he died and although he did seem 'down', I had no idea he was suicidal. I guess he kept that to himself.

I think it is tragic but I have come to accept his choice and I know his soul has gone to a better place now. This world is not easy and for some people it ends up being just too much.

Mental anguish and suffering is something invisible and even in my own country (Australia), people will usually only mention their depression to counsellors or shrinks. And as other posters have already pointed out, add to that the strong stigma of mental illness in Japan and you have a problem which is very hard to address. Instead of resorting to lame AKB47 posters, the government should set up anonymous hotlines or websites for people (if they haven't done so already - please correct me if they have).

So, two things: we need to address the root causes - stress, overwork, insomnia, bullying, lack of hope about the future, or chronic biological depression - and secondly, go about helping these people anonymously so that they can avoid the 'ostracism radar' of Japan (if that makes sense).

7 ( +7 / -0 )

So sad to hear this. Poor girl.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Maybe she took her life as she felt she would never look as 'cute' as those AKB48 girls in the suicide prevention posters. Oh the irony.... seriously R.I.P. this shouldn't be happening.

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

no one really knows what the circumstances are at this point. Was she bullied? Did she fail a test to get into junior high? too much pressure from mom and dad? I think susieuk hit on it.. there seems to be a lack of places where someone can go and just talk to someone. It doesn't hurt to let out whats on your mind!

You're forgetting that it could also be mental illness outside of any societal or family pressures. Even children can suffer from chemical imbalances and depression. All the talk about 'noble' or 'not noble' is missing the point - when mental illness takes over, it completely warps and impairs cognitive processes. If someone is in the grip of severe mental disorder, the ability to 'step outside your mind and think rationally' can be a near impossible feat, and I'd imagine especially so in the case of a child who's mind is not fully developed yet anyway. This bottom line is is that a 12 year old died because they felt life was too painful to continue living.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

How sad, I bet the parents are questioning themselves. Such a waste of a young life, instead of AKB48 posters how about setting up counseling at schools for the young. Deal with the real issues not promote some lame girls group to solve youth issues.

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

Heartbreaking. That poor little girl to be in so much anguish to end her life and in such a way. It brought tears to my eyes thinking about her last day on this earth and the hopelessness she must have felt. I don't really have any other words....

0 ( +2 / -2 )

For stories like this, I really don't see the need for JT to allow voting on comments, or indeed, the need for comments at all!

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Parents are to blame 100%. If they noticed something was wrong and just ignored it or were too ashamed or afraid or to ask for help, I blame them. If they were too busy to notice, I blame them. If they are the cause of this directly, I blame them. I hope they suffer and good on her for taking revenge on them. Maybe now they will notice! Too little, too late!

Ok before pointing fingers, particularly in a tragedy like this, how about taking a second and trying to walk in the shoes of the family. What type of household was she in? Were her parents even around? There are so many unanswered questions and a lack of information about her situation that I can not agree with "blaming the parents 100%".

Many of us have children and while we try our hardest to know what's going on in their lives there is no absolute way in which any of us can truly know EVERYTHING about what is going on in their lives or heads for that matter.

It's too easy to point fingers. Japanese, even kids this age, are very adept at hiding their feelings. One might not even know who or what was the motivation for this child to take this desperate action.

All we can do is love and support them as best as possible and try to be aware of their needs.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

there needs to be a place where people can go and talk to someone. Psychological research suggests that 'the talking cure' which is the foundation of Western therapy and every-day lay stress reduction strategies is not nearly so effective in East Asia. Talking about a traumatic event reduced American blood pressure but increased Asian blood pressure. Self-Talk increases task performance in Americans but reduces it Asian Americans. Writing, as opposed to talking, about something seems to bring out more emotion but it does not result in improved affect (happiness after the tears). Japanese born therapies usually involve some sort of non-linguistic visual presentation of self , such as the "Jungian" sand play that Kawaii imported and remains so popular, Yoshimoto's Naikan, Dousa movement therapy, Tsubou Lidded Pot image therapy, Morita's sweeping, self-representational photography, and the Japanese Kitaoka version of NLP which stresses perceptual positions, and adds a fourth. This lady may not have needed someone to talk to so much as someone to watch her, or "watch with" (Kitayama) her.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Reading this story felt like someone ripping a piece of my heart out. To lose a child in an accident is one thing, but to lose them at this age through suicide is a totally different ball game.

Parents and close relatives need to be made aware of that children do not have the psychological stability and experience to deal with the pressures an adult can often endure, and so must be treated in a way that helps them and not constantly criticizes them for every single fault or error.

Parents, in my humble opinion, should also learn how to cope with children under stress, or at least learn to recognize it first for what it is.

As for any reader her feeling hopeless, understand this is a temporary state and it will in time pass so get support to help your during this state. Anyone really need help feel free to contact me if no other viable option helping keep you here, although TELL (Tokyo English Life Line) should be your first port of call.

Take care readers and look after your children with extra love and care. There is something they might not be telling you...

4 ( +6 / -2 )

This poor girl is yet another victim of the "education system" in Japan.

The whole thing needs to be scrapped and designed from the ground up. I've lived in many countries and been a teacher all my working life and I've NEVER seen such a hopeless system as this.

The information they are force fed has NO relevance whatsoever to their lives. The way it is taught makes interesting subjects boring. It is, basically, mind control.

Young people the information they NEED to SURVIVE in this world.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Poor girl. My thoughts : Mental depression is an issue because it is not healed enough in Japan.. People are ashamed and usually they don't want to give a bad image of themselves.. Only exit is suicide.. In Japan it serms easier to end one's life that to "beg" people's help, where in fact gov should be taken responsible for providing such help.. Life has so little meaning here sometimes it seems to me..

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Someone once said, "Suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem." I had a uni mate suicide in second year. I saw what it did to his loving parents. I could never do that to anyone. Tragic then - and now.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I wonder why the suicide rate is so high in Japan? Does the past earthquake or nuclear spills have some blame? Or is it true that Japan expects a lot of each person individually? Is it because she feels inferior being a girl? (As in China-they only value sons.) If anyone has some serious answers, knowing Japan's people, please elaborate. Thank You. RIP-beautiful, innocent girl.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

What could possibly be so bad, where anyone, especially a child, would see suicide as the best alternative. I want to take kids like this and give them a big hug and let them know that it can get better.

-1 ( +2 / -2 )

Gotta put some of the blame on the parents. They have to look for signs of trouble.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

What is really sad about this and similar stories is how the government & society (in general) doesn't really care. Shoganai ne!

We live in a cold country, where usually empathy and compassion ceases to exist once you walk outside your home. Even worse, some homes also lack any empathy or compassion. Also, you are indirectly taught that asking for help is a sign of weakness and you will be made to feel inferior and a burden.

Yes Japan is a good country, but the people and families (in general) seem cold, selfish and miserable..

Why? (maybe) If I was governed by a large group of stubborn, outdated, inept, selfish, corrupt and totally useless old men - and I lived, studied and worked by rules and systems that just seem to hinder any personal growth, thinking and acting independently, I too would feel depressed.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Yubaru, totally disagree, but many like you have not reach the level of trusting THEIR instincts. Instincts NEVER lie, most people just choose to ignore them by second guessing themselves. You should always feel when something is wrong, especially if it is your child, and please do something about it. As my saying goes, believe nothing you hear, half of what you see, and EVERYTHING your instincts tell you.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I could never do that to anyone.

You don't understand depression. It completely warps and disfigures your cognitive processes, rational thinking, perceptions, attitudes, feelings change drastically. Unlike a disease like cancer and diabetes (I'm not minimising either), where if you find out you have them, you still have your sanity and can take steps to deal and approach the issue with the help of a doctor (and yes, cancer is an extremely difficult disease to beat and takes enormous amounts of courage and willpower), the insidious nature of depression attacks your mind, so sentiments which people make in a non-depressed state of mind like 'I could never do that to anyone' mean nothing when your mind has been transformed by this disease. More people need to recognise depression for the ILLNESS that it is, it's not simply a state of melancholia and feeling down the dumps or 'having a bad day'. Awareness is still so pitiful, not only in Japan, but basically every other country too.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Yes this is tragic - as a visitor to Japan on a number of occassions I was fascinated by many aspects of japanesse life that we were able to observe. I do remember noticing a distinct lack of smiling faces - perhaps just serious or was i just only noticing commuters on their way to work? Suicide is also a noticible theme in some of Haruki Murakimi's brilliant work which is understandable. Well perhaps not a theme but its there if you know what I mean. That 31,000 figure sounds disturbing

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Yubaru, totally disagree, but many like you have not reach the level of trusting THEIR instincts

Do you have children? Instincts are not always 100%, I've learned that. Also you don't know me so please dont assume to know what I do or for that matter do not do!

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I feel sorry for the girl, who needed help and couldn't get it. I feel sorry for the family, who now need to deal with the loss, and I also feel sorry for the train driver who had to watch while the train killed the girl; unable to stop in time. There's also the people who had to deal with cleaning up the site if the suicide. It's horrible to think that a girl so young believed that there were no possible solutions to the problems that made her feel she couldn't go on.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

The suicide of this 12-year-old girl makes one wonder why AKB is being used to deter suicide. You have to admit that some girls and young women might be very depressed if they feel they don't match the AKB standard of "cuteness."

-11 ( +2 / -13 )

thats really sad that a child needs to feel so much stress, when at htat age they sould be just enjoying life. life is precious...chang the system..respect the children...its not a competiton

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

As the_harper said.....I too feel for the girl, family and the train driver. Thats horrible!

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

more sad news. Only 12 years old! Poor girl. in the states suicide is illegal.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

that poor girl she had so much to live for did anyone try to get the girl off the tracks instead of watching it!

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I'm going to go home tonight and hug my kids tight ... then remind them that their parents love them. I'm quite saddened to read this. You too please (if you have kids) ... when you go home tonight go hug your kids and remind them they're special.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

A big part of it is this Shoganai attitude. They need to start a campaign against shoganai. Dont just give up there is a choice. There is something you can do.

She was so young, didnt even know what life was. I feel sad for the driver of the train.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Hate these stories and there is never any follow-up. Just that someone is dead. Speculation without facts always runs around in the same tired circles.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

What a tragedy... RIP little one. Can you imagine what the train driver is going through now. Boy, I hope he gets counseling.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Apparently today the posters think you and me are nuts Erik... I try to look at things at the root (society). I think this AKB trance rots the kids to the core of how to look and act...

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

no children. but i have parents, and there were many time where i convinced my parents they were wrong about something, even though in their hearts they knew sonething was wrong. i lied and lied out of fear or embarrassement. their instinct was right but i convinced them otherwise. dont feel bad, a very very few people can truley trust their instincts and stick with their guns (feeling of sonething is not right). instincts are 100%! it takes time to go back and think of all the times you thought u were right about something, were convinced otherwise by deceit, later finding out u were right all along, 100% for me so far. its a long exercise and i recommend people to try it so they can realize how powerful instincts are.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

This kind of horribly sad news just makes me sick! What could possibly drive a 12 year old to this?? RIP

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

something is wrong with society these days when 12 yo kids get driven to this. Not only in Japan but everywhere.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The psychological make-up of a child is made of child based experiences and views of the world 'they' live in. An adults 'theirs'. Yes, depression is one of many mental diseases, just as cancer is a physical one, yet for a child to commit suicide even if they were prone to such a disease would still need a 'trigger' or number of them in order to take such drastic action. Therefore, what were they and what action did adults that interacted with the child take to notice them? Teacher and not just parents should be made aware of the warning signs and given help in learning to deal with matters that can lead to such loss of precious life.

In closing, for those giving me the thumbs down and don't know me, just know that I have been through the tragic death of my only son in a traffic accident on his way to school last year, so have first hand experience at the horror the death of a child to bring, hence my comments above this one.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

What sort of trucked up society pushes a 12 year old elementary school girl to lay down in front of a train to kill herself? I am stunned! Will there be an investigation into the circumstances of why she killed herself? Probably not!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The police have stated that the parents told them the girl spoke to them the day before and sought their advice. Let's not assume the parents did anything wrong. We do not know this.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Oh dear. Surely the govt can do more that put up AKB48 posters.

What would they do? This is family and local isssue,not governments.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

@papigiulio

There is nothing honorable about suicide

Yes there is.In Japan it is honorable.Your opinion may be different,and that is fine.You can say,"I don't think suicide is honorable."But the reality is that in Japan,it is honorable.WE often dream of the cold steel sword in hand as sun rises and white crane files overhead.It is this culture.

DisillusionedMAR. 01, 2012 - 03:24PM JST

What sort of trucked up society pushes a 12 year old elementary school girl to lay down in front of a train to kill herself?

Society has nothing to do with it.She made the decision.

-12 ( +1 / -13 )

@ Bill Page. I cannot tell you how sorry I am to hear about your son. Thank you for being strong and telling us about him. I cannot even begin to imagine what you have been through and in all fact, are still going through. My three are the light of my life and I couldn't imagine being without them.

I agree with what you have said. It is upto adults in the child's immediate life circle to protect and nurture them. My kids are past the age where they spend all day under my supervision as they go to primary school. I hope that if the teachers at their school noticed anything odd in their behaivour or any problems at the school, they would inform me and work with me to sort it out. Somebody somewhere must, if even for a second, looked at this little girl and seen in her eyes that all wasn't well. We are talking about a little girl of only twelve. I cannot believe there wasn't a warning sign somewhere.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

There is a telephone service, Inochinodenwa (いのちの電話), that people can ring, or contact through the internet, though many Japanese do no seem to know much about it. It is a sort of local samaritans service, not dissimilar to TELL (Tokyo English Life Line). Interestingly, Japanese (returnees) are one of the largest groups of users of TELL, which might suggest that there are few options for them, or that they feel more comfortable talking with foreigners.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

^Death is only honorable when is meaningful if you kill yourself because you have regrets that's just pitiful and sad.

I think Japan should put more emphasis on Psychotherapy and parents should pay more attention to their kids, and teach them how to cope with stress, Life is full of ups and downs when you get only downs you sink into the darkness of despair, you're losing hope, confidence and self-esteem, you don't see the meaning of living anymore. People just need a reason or a purpose to live, Only their family or friends can pull them out this darkness, shouldering all the sadness and depression alone will only deepen their despair.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Nobody needs to start attacking parents or the government. Let's start loving and listening to the people around us more. Including anonymous commenters on the internet.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I think this kind of reporting does nothing to help focus on the deeper social and economic causes that brought about the extreme rise in the suicide rate in Japan.

And??? It's a news article. A news article about an apparent suicide. That's ALL it is. It's aim wasn't intended to explore the causes and possible solutions to Japan's suicide rate.

While your comment is completely true, so too would a comment such as, "This kind of reporting does nothing to help focus on the deeper social and economic causes that brought about the 'Occupy x' movement" be completely true (and STILL have nothing to do with the aim of this article).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It really break my heart and very sad to read this kind of news especially if the victim is a minor. Japanese culture and society got something to do with suicide. I have lived in Japan for so many years and have tried to observe and understand the children's daily life of joy, fun and play. As my ex father in law once said, WORK is the main priority before the family. I did understand later why my ex-wife was deeply concerned about money. That's how she was raised. For them work=money. With money, they can provide their children with high tech toys etc. to play indoors and no worries they go out and play with friends in parks or playgrounds. But what parents don't know, kids need each of their parent playing and having fun with them as they grow even for a short time a day. As I noticed, most kids just grow with feeling of emptiness. Sad, alone, scared and depressed. They look for some outlet from their sadness in school and their classmates and at times being bullied adding more depression to the poor kid. At times, since both parents are busy earning money, they even enroll their kids to learn piano, ballet, english etc so as to keep their kids busy and away from the streets. With their load of assignments at school plus lessons of whatsoever, kids time for playing and enjoying kid's life as they grow become very, very slim. Kids need interactions between other kids around the neighborhood. That's how they have fun, become strong and independent. Parents for sure love their children. But love by showering them with what they like and need just to keep them busy and away from troubles is not the best love to give a growing child. IMHO that's what I have observed while living in Japan that may induce suicide among minors.

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I really would like to know what the parents were doing.

Their method of raising her, especially. No child will despair that much, if the parents showed her that they love her no matter what.

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Their method of raising her, especially. No child will despair that much, if the parents showed her that they love her no matter what.

What you need to understand is that even if a child is raised in the most loving, nurturing environment, goes to a good school, is a good pupil, has lots of friends, they can STILL develop a mental disorder independantly of any of those factors. Who knows, if this is the case (and of course it's just speculation at this point), then it's also very possible that she kept up a facade right up until the very end. People need to educate themselves on mood disorders. Depression doesn't always require some external stimulus or a lifetime of abuse to be instigated.

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instincts are 100%

One can not make a blanket statement about what may be right for them and assume it fits for everyone. How one is raised, their environment, their abilities or inabilities to interact with other people amongst a host of other social and environmental factors.

People particularly from the US are taught from a young age or at the very least have heard the phrase "trust your instincts" and learn what they are but are often times NOT taught the difference between instincts and FEELINGS which I believe many confuse between the two.

Japanese kids for the most part, and many adults as well are not tuned into nor taught how to listen to them.

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@j4p4nFTW

Give examples. There have several notable cases, not only in Japanese history, where suicide, by fighting to the death for example, was indeed honourable.

But in this girl's case, and all other suicides caused by stress/depression etc are NOT honourable. There was no good outcome, nobody was saved, nobody gained. There was only loss.

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I really think that many people here walk around with problems they cant handle. It's almost a norm so I am not sure if there facilities in place for people to simply sit down and talk with a professional; even they do exist, people are not encouraged to express there true feelings. For someone who is like an emotional sponge like myself, it's difficult to see sadness and not be overwhelmed. Mental issues are as serious as physical. I am simply sorry for this child. I hope that one day people will start going against their "honor" so that the number of suicides can go down.

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@j4p4nFTW nothing honurable about suicide, its just another form of murder, just because a certain culture has done something for so many years doesnt make it wright/honourable. 30,000+ suicides in japan for the last 14years thats more than 420,000 people!! and people keep there sympathies for the natural disaster victims, A bomb etc. when the truth of the matter is there have probably been more deaths by suicide than the Abombs and natural disasters combined!! oh buts it honourable isnt it!!??

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@wtfjapan couldn't say it better. Suicide is more devastating to human lives than almost any other cause of death. It is over looked greatly as the norm because it is has been drawn out over the decades and centuries.

People need to see that they have something to live for. Just because another person or institution says you aren't good enough means nothing.

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People need to see that they have something to live for. Just because another person or institution says you aren't good enough means nothing.

You have no idea that's what happened to cause her suicide.

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So young.... D:

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Bullying ??? Peer Pressure ??? Stress from Bullying + Juku + Tests + Monster Parents = Suicide

who knows ??? But if I was her teacher/friend, I give her words of encouragement and positive outlook towards the future.

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