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1st nursing care trainees from Myanmar arrive in Japan

11 Comments

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Only 3 !? Wow, the flood gates are open. And they still have to pass Japanese language proficiency

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Totally sham, report on the number of people that have entered the program and how many "graduated" over the years it would be less that 0.05% I'm sure of it because of the language requirement and the two years they must master it while working fully time for next to no money.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Hehe.  Typical Japan.  3!!!!!   And from Myanmar which, although no longer sanctioned by the UN, is a bit dodgy and definitely 3rd world (and so cheap).

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Come here, work and then leave. That's all J-Gov want. But any money that they manage to save out of a no doubt paltry salary will be repatriated to Myanmar, not spent here. J-gov don't want that.

When karma meets cash, cash wins!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

around 4,300 people have come to Japan. But only 719 individuals had passed the exam

This is the real news. So many applicants, but only a small percentage are accepted. Dawg forbid the Japanese staff should actually learn a second language to accommodate them. They are the ones doing Japan a favor by coming here Japan is not doungbthem any favors by inviting them.

The article doesn’t mention how many of these immigrant workers actually stick out three years of skavery. I know for a fact that very few last the three years. Most go home within for the first six months due to ill treatment, poor working conditions and poor salaries.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

A story about three young women from a warm, if not hot, country, being sent to northernmost Japan, where only a few days ago the airport was shut down because of snowfall...well, at least the girls can witness Sapporo's Snow Festival (if they get some time off). This whole program is a sham.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

This is the real news. So many applicants, but only a small percentage are accepted.

I don't think 'accepted' is the correct word. Only a small percentage meet the requirements.

Dawg forbid the Japanese staff should actually learn a second language to accommodate them.

The problem is that care workers have to deal with medicines, and to some degree they are responsible for the lives of those in their care. Having people who cannot speak or read the local language can literally be a life or death situation.

They are the ones doing Japan a favor by coming here Japan is not doungbthem any favors by inviting them.

It goes both ways. They often can make much more money in Japan than in their home nations, and they get to live in Japan - a first-world nation with a particularly high quality of life.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Let's see the follow up interview about how much they love the Japanese culture after 3 years of being talked down to, made to feel inferior, not paid what they were told, forced to work more hours than agreed (and not paid for those, either), etc, etc, etc.

Japan is the one with the problem - declining population, not enough locals willing to fill these positions (reasons don't matter). So if language is the issue with bringing in foreigners, it seems Japan will have to bend eventually or face their own extinction.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Welcome. Hope these young people pave the way for others to follow.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

One thing confuses me here. Naturally, Japan wants immigrant workers to have a high proficiently in the Japanese language (as Strangerland points out, it could be life or death in a care situation).

Yet some years ago, at an immigration office, the more Japanese I spoke and wrote, the more angry the immigration officer seemed to get.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

One thing confuses me here. Naturally, Japan wants immigrant workers to have a high proficiently in the Japanese language (as Strangerland points out, it could be life or death in a care situation).

Yet some years ago, at an immigration office, the more Japanese I spoke and wrote, the more angry the immigration officer seemed to get.

Are you a care worker?

And maybe your Japanese wasn't so good - speaking Japanese makes immigration go smooth and easy for me every time.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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