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2 Narita airport workers confirmed as having measles

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The virus has an incubation period of 10 to 12 days.

This is the scariest part of diseases like this, you could be carrying it around and not know it until its too late.

Get vaccinated people!

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Been a big problem/issue in America lately....

0 ( +3 / -3 )

This really affects real things.. my wife currently pregnant can't go near any large groups because her rubella antibody count is low, despite having a top up a few years ago, and you can't have a top up while in the early stages and there have been several outbreaks.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

My hospital is in no way prepared for this.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Been a big problem/issue in America lately....

Yeah it's happening throughout parts of Europe as well as Australasia, Asia and the Pacific. Things are looking pretty rough all over. Was only recently I heard about it being a big problem in America though.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

So if you've been vaccinated and have vaccinated your children then what's the worry? Either they work and you have nothing to worry about or they don't work.

I believe vaccines work but it's silly to think those who don't get them will spread diseases around to those who have. Let people get them or not get them. The only ones who will worry are those who haven't.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Back in Feb, I quote,

“Health officials in Japan are combating the country’s worst measles outbreak in years, with many infections clustered among attendees of a Valentine’s Day gift fair and a religious group that avoids vaccinations.”

nothing to do with foreigners but same as in America it’s spread by those who haven’t been vaccinated.

10 ( +14 / -4 )

My hospital is in no way prepared for this, or any of the foreign introduced diseases expected due to the olympics.

Unless the source of infection - the person(s) who passed measles to either of these workers - is traced, it cannot be assumed that this outbreak is introduced from abroad. It is of course a strong possibility, but it is equally likely that it was spread in Narita airport from within Japan. This country is not measles-free (it was reported in 20 out of 47 prefectures earlier this year), and huge numbers of travellers go to Narita airport from all over Japan.

What is certainly true though, is that an outbreak at an airport can set off multiple further outbreaks in multiple countries, which could quickly run into thousands of infections. Measles is exceptionally contagious, with a much higher basic reproduction number than many other diseases. A single person can easily infect more than a dozen others, who then go on to spread the virus themselves.

Measles is something that Japan needs to get fully under control, chiefly through universal vaccination, before it can afford the luxury of considering it a foreign-introduced disease. While measles exists among people living in Japan, Japan itself is the infection risk.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

@Hubert

It’s not that simple. Some people can’t be safely vaccinated (small babies, people with allergies, people with damaged immune systems).

It seems a bit unfair to put them at risk through a combination of ignorance and superstition on the part of healthy anti-vaxers.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

@Goodluckglue, “foreign”? No diseases are “foreign”, especially measles, STDs etc. Hope the airport workers recover soon.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Here in Okinawa the uptake of vaccinations is below that which is needed to keep infections down, the rest of Japan is pretty well covered. Be well everyone, and vaccinate. Science proves it is the best way to lessen the impact of, survive, these viruses.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Remember when getting the measles was normal? And you never had to worry about getting it again once you've gotten it?

-7 ( +3 / -10 )

lol what's the big deal? Why is that even a news?

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

what's the big deal? Why is that even a news?

Ah!......The big deal is that measles causes secondary problems that can disable a person. I had measles when I was young and nearly lost my hearing because of an ear infection from measles. There are lots of information on how measles affects pregnant women.....so that is why everyone should get vaccinated. Our of respect for others and society.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Remember when getting the measles was normal?

I do, as it happens. Good times! People used to die of it, and a number of other diseases besides. Additionally, a proportion of blind people, and a proportion of deaf people, acquired their disability as a result of measles.

And you never had to worry about getting it again once you've gotten it?

Lifetime immunity is a benefit of catching and surviving an infectious disease, if you happen to survive it without any adverse consequences. But it is a benefit acquired at great cost to the population at large: the continued spread of the disease, the continued complications of that disease in some patients, and the continued deaths from the disease. In addition there is the inconvenience and cost of quarantining patients, or of shutting down buildings, schools, or institutions where outbreaks occur. And the lost days of school or work for individual patients. And the drawn-out suffering from the illness itself, which any rational person would avoid when the alternative is a safe, practically painless injection.

To put it in simple terms, people who think that the best way to gain immunity from a disease is to wait until they actually catch it are deluded. It can take years before that happens, and many "childhood" diseases are far more severe in adolescents and adults. And it's a completely hopeless - and dangerous - way to face the threat of the whole range of vaccine-preventable diseases, if all you're trying to achieve is the benefit of immunity.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

These parents who thought they were so smart 20-some years ago by not getting their kids vaccinated are finding out now the hard way about why vaccinations are necessary and important.

Get vaccinated!

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I remember my parents explaining the science behind vaccinations when they took me to get a polio vaccine when I was in elementary school in the 1950's. I remember how positive they were about it. Fear of polio was a big deal back then.

I had my kids vaccinated against measles, mumps, chickenpox, tetanus, Diphtheria, Polio, Rubella and TB.

Its a no brainer, catching these diseases doesn't make you stronger in fact it has the opposite effect, measles in particular can do lasting damage to your immune system.

Vaccinate!

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Measles is a real problem, and the fact that we are dealing with it again when it should have been eradicated long ago is testament to the stupidity of a large sector of mankind.

My grandfather was blind in one eye due to measles, and he still got called up to fight the entire hellish length of WWII. If only he'd had bonespurs, he might have been saved that plight.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Its a no brainer, catching these diseases doesn't make you stronger in fact it has the opposite effect, measles in particular can do lasting damage to your immune system.

Or worse, they could kill you !

I can see that there are plenty of anti-vaccinate people reading along here on this topic, and I for one would LOVE to see what excuses they will give for NOT getting vaccinated or having their children vaccinated!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Remember when getting the measles was normal? And you never had to worry about getting it again once you've gotten it?

This is an historically and medically ignorant view of the disease. People can die of measles. Medical care has improved greatly in the last 100 years, but prior to mass vaccination campaigns in the U.S., measles was one of the top four leading causes of childhood death. Getting measles was common, but it was also dangerous.

What is perhaps worse, the measles virus wreaks havoc on the immune system, leaving it weakened for months and even years. Since measles was nearly eradicated in the U.S. and some other developed countries (prior to the recent outbreaks brought about by people failing to vaccinate, unregulated immigration from countries with poor vaccination rates, and travel to countries where measles is still endemic), the rates and seriousness of many other diseases also decreased dramatically. Doctors have traced this directly to the lingering effects of measles on the human body. If measles spreads widely in Japan, the U.S., or Europe, expect a wave of other diseases to follow at higher frequency and deadliness than the current generation has ever experienced.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Bloody irresponsible of a) the worker himself reporting to work like that (unless a doctor cleared him) and b) of the workplace ethic which still encourages people to deny they are sick. “Oh, it’s just a pollen allergy...” yeah, right, how often have I heard that!

2 ( +4 / -2 )

He worked in the Terminal 2 building from 7 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. the previous day, 2 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. last Wednesday and 6 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. last Friday

Long hours ?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

-it did not disclose what service he had engaged in. 

Ah, Government information again. Would be useful to know if he worked in Baggage Handling or the Check-in counter at JAL... there's sort of a big difference there.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

In Okinawa over 15% of the SOFA Status dependents 18 under are unvaccinated per 2017/18 stats from DODEA. Most of those unvaccinated received the religious or personal exemption waiver by signing the letter and turning it into the registrar. I just hope the outbreak on Okinawa continues to decline or they will be in for a very rude awakening.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

”......unregulated immigration from countries with poor vaccination rates, and travel to countries where measles is still endemic), the rates and seriousness of many other diseases also decreased dramatically”

The downside of globalism! With Japan targeting 60 million inbound tourists a year, a large proportion of them from Asian countries with demonstrably deficient health services, we can expect more and more outbreaks such as this.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Australia had a few Measles out break all from foreign travellers, these unfortunate workers probably contracted it from travellers that shouldn't have been travelling.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Australia had a few Measles out break all from foreign travellers, these unfortunate workers probably contracted it from travellers that shouldn't have been travelling.

You could benefit from reading this.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4300546/#R13

Some revealing quotes:

"In stark contrast to these positive health indicators, Japan is also well known as a country with persistently high rates of vaccine preventable diseases (VPD) such as hepatitis B, measles, rubella, mumps, and varicella."

"People traveling from Japan have also repeatedly brought VPD overseas with them. Japan accounted for more measles importation to the United States than any other single country between 1993 and 2001. Between 1994 and 2013 there were 32 cases of measles, 156 cases of mumps and 16 cases of rubella imported to Hawai‘i from Japan."

"A qualitative study of Japanese resident physicians demonstrated low personal vaccination rates for measles and themes of lack of awareness of disease severity and fear of adverse effects. Additionally large numbers of healthcare workers have been shown to be susceptible to VPD."

In other words, Japan has a lot of work to do before it starts complaining about these diseases being introduced from outside. If it's sloppy about prevention internally, then it's not bothered enough about preventing these diseases in the first place. Unvaccinated physicians? Jesus Christ.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I don't quite understand the scale of the problem or who is at risk.

I understand that the take-up rate of the measles vaccine in Japan is about 97% among children. That is considered high. I think that rate has been achieved over the last 30 years or so since the measles vaccine became part of the standard vaccination program. Does that mean most under-30s are considered immune? (Although I note one of the people mentioned in the article was a teenager.)

Can someone clarify?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Can’t remember but isn’t this one of the sicknesses kids often got when we were kids? Too long ago to remember.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

@wipeout, thanks for the link.

But the article also says this, "Japanese rates of routine vaccinations are among the highest in the world." It seems there is more of a problem with non-routine (voluntary) vaccines. Measles is one of the routine vaccines, so it doesn't really explain a high incidence of measles, if indeed there is a higher incidence than other countries. (The comparison data in the article of reported cases between Japan and the US is for a single year only.)

0 ( +2 / -2 )

In Okinawa over 15% of the SOFA Status dependents 18 under are unvaccinated per 2017/18 stats from DODEA. Most of those unvaccinated received the religious or personal exemption waiver by signing the letter and turning it into the registrar. I just hope the outbreak on Okinawa continues to decline or they will be in for a very rude awakening.

Do all of us here a favor and do not allow those who are not vaccinated off-base! Lock their butts down!

Thank you for this information though, I will be passing it along to the Health Department here along with the request to quarantine any and all US military folks here in Okinawa who are not vaccinated!

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

in Japan is about 97% among children. This is true, but it is the 3% that causes the problem. Look at it mathematically, if you have 1 million kids and a 97% vaccination rate, you still have 30,000 kids at risk of getting measles, Factor in the standard measles vaccine MMR lasts for 20 years, so may a big population of adults that needs a booster. The Narita worker was in his 30s ,so if was vaccinated when he was an infant, it stands to reason that MMR wore off and he was exposed by a foreigner traveler.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Can’t remember but isn’t this one of the sicknesses kids often got when we were kids? Too long ago to remember.

Yup. Used to be normal. Now Big Pharma is pushing vaccines that their CEOs don't give their own children. Everyone who pushes vaccines on others is a total tool of Big Pharma.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

This is stupid, you get vaccinated, pure and simple and that this point, if you don’t, I think in order to root out this once eradicated disease, you get it done. People are so naive, not taking chance I m kids, they all got vaccinated and now in NY you are seeing a growing epidemic and it will only worsen and people will die if they continue to ignore the signs and medical advisors. I’m not a big medicine taking guy, but this one was a No brainer for me.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@serengoza. Dying of smallpox, getting polio etc used to be “normal”. Doesn’t mean we want that now.

Don’t push that big pharma BS. Vaccines are cheap. If there was some big conspiracy, they would want you to get sick and hooked on treatment forever. Lol, you probably think obesity with it’s related issues such as high blood pressure, diabetes, joint degeneration, high cholesterol etc is a big pharma plot.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

There's a measles outbreak in the US - it's already a public health emergency

People who aren't vaccinated are ordered by state governments to stay out of public areas - if they don't, they can be put on house-arrest

If one is not vaccinated, that's the kind of life one can face - when the public's health is at stake

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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