national

2-year-old boy dies at children’s hospital following norovirus outbreak

12 Comments

A two-year-old boy died after a norovirus outbreak at the Tokyo Metropolitan Children’s Medical Center in Fuchu city, Tokyo. Health authorities said the boy, who died on Thursday, was one of 10 children who were admitted to the hospital, Fuji TV reported Saturday.

According to the hospital, the patients, ranging in age from 2 months to 10 years, were admitted to the hospital suffering from the norovirus between March 12 and March 18. They were all on the same floor.

The two-year-old boy had been hospitalized before due to congenital heart and lung disease. The hospital said that on March 16, he exhibited symptoms of diarrhea and his condition progressively worsened until his death was confirmed on Thursday night.

While the exact cause of death has yet to be determined, the hospital is investigating whether it was directly related to the norovirus outbreak.

© Japan Today

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

12 Comments
Login to comment

A norovirus outbreak?

Sad news for this little young boy.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

A norovirus outbreak?

Not so unusual, it happens here. I wish more people would wash their hands here more often.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Sad to see a little kid died, but I'm pretty the norovirus was just of his other health issues that killed him. I've had norovirus and it's not pleasant at all. However, I did lose nearly five kilos in a week, which was not all bad. The really disturbing thing about norovirus is, it comes from food that has been in touch with faeces. It puts a whole new relevance to the term, "Eat poop and die!"

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The really disturbing thing about norovirus is, it comes from food that has been in touch with faeces

Aren't some forms of hepatitis also transmitted that way? Through faece? Whenever I'm about and about in public, it amazes me how so many Japanese do not wash their hands.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

it amazes me how so many Japanese do not wash their hands.

It amazes, and frightens, me too. I been a witness to it many times, even at my schools. I'll be at the sink washing my hands or brushing my teeth when another teacher exits the toilet stall, briefly moistens the tips of his fingers, then walks out. My reaction is much like that in this clip:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ssktVpcv9WI

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Hilarious Seinfeld vid there sensei! Notice how Jerry was too "pc" to just openly confront the chef?

I been a witness to it many times, even at my schools.

I've seen this with patrons of izakayas, western style pubs and big pachinko centers. These people are just not washing their hands.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The really disturbing thing about norovirus is, it comes from food that has been in touch with faeces.

That's one source, put most cases come from person-to-person contact.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The really disturbing thing about norovirus is, it comes from food that has been in touch with faeces.

Most of us have suffered experienced one form or other food poisoning at least once in our lives, and it is highly likely to have been from food that has been "in touch with feces". This is the fecal-oral route

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fecal-oral_route

which is also a common way for many diseases (polio, cholera, or hepatitis A, for example) to make their way into the body. Among foodborne illnesses, if covers infection with e. coli, salmonella, norovirus, and others.

Simply put, the fecal-oral route it is the introduction into the mouth of any substance or object that has been contaminated through some form of direct or indirect contact with human or animal feces. That's an extremely wide set of conditions.

And while norovirus is transmitted via the fecal-oral route, and via food, it certainly doesn't have to be through either. It can be present on a door handle, a floor or wall, a seat, and the contamination may be fecal in origin, or it may have come from the vomit of an infected person.

The more disturbing aspect of norovirus is its resilience, as infected people can pass it on days after recovering, and it can remain on surfaces and infect people weeks later.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

What's this feces all about?

Noro virus can and will be transmitted the same way as most all viruses, through bodily fluid that had become air borne like sneezing and coughs that you breathe directly or if you touch it like train straps and then self inflicting by eating with your bare hand without thoroughly washing them first. Licking your finger tips to count bills in your wallet, munching down on chips, grabbing a mouthful of chocolates can all result in contracting Noro virus.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"I wish more people would wash their hands here more often."

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2335003/Seven-MILLION-Britons-dont-brush-teeth-regularly--going-DAYS-pick-toothbrush.html

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"I wish more people would wash their hands here more often."

if someone with noro throws up and you use the same toilet after him (does not even have to be the same stall), you can wash your hands all day long. It is airborne...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What's this feces all about?

While not the only way that norovirus can spread, feces is a major source of transmission. Explosive diarrhea is one of the symptoms of norovirus infection, and it is an effective way of getting the virus onto surfaces and into the air. Vomiting is another, and these symptoms occur with sudden onset.

Coughing and sneezing are not symptoms associated with norovirus infection.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites