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22 forced sterilization victims without records to be compensated

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From 1948 to 1996, Japan's eugenics law authorized the sterilization of people with intellectual disabilities, mental illness or hereditary disorders to prevent births of "inferior" offspring.

It's repugnant that it took so long to repeal this law. 1996 ffs. Advanced countries knocked this nonsense on the head long before 1996.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

However, only about 3,000 of the approximately 25,000 have records of the surgery.

This is a black eye on Japan and I can not image the pain, suffering and embarrassment these people are having to go through here. The government NOT keeping records as well is so "un-Japanese"

More likely the records were trashed to protect those who did the surgery and the government! Not unheard of here!

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

25,000 people sterilized. 3 million payout each...

75,000,000,000 payout coming?

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

$30k...laughable. Make sure to laugh in their face right before the phony bowing begins.

-7 ( +3 / -10 )

Consider it is done according to the law of them time, and for a society desirable goal (let's face it, there's reproductive rights and there's acknowledging the real burdens of a mentally weak "product" to both himself and all around him), a $30000 settlement even on weak evidence is OK.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

The US actually led the way, passing the first eugenics coercive sterilization law in 1907, and investing heavily in eugenics research- https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugenics_in_the_United_States

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Consider it is done according to the law of them time, and for a society desirable goal (let's face it, there's reproductive rights and there's acknowledging the real burdens of a mentally weak "product" to both himself and all around him), a $30000 settlement even on weak evidence is OK.

Repugnant.

The US actually led the way, passing the first eugenics coercive sterilization law in 1907, and investing heavily in eugenics research- 

Even after the details of the Nazi sterilization program (as well as its role as a precursor to the "Euthanasia" murders) became more widely known after World War II (and which the New York Timeshad reported on extensively and in great detail even before its implementation in 1934), sterilizations in some American states did not stop. Some states continued to sterilize residents into the 1970s.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

This is a black eye on Japan and I can not image the pain, suffering and embarrassment these people are having to go through here. The government NOT keeping records as well is so "un-Japanese"

More likely the records were trashed to protect those who did the surgery and the government! Not unheard of here!

Face the reality, this is so Japanese. The Japanese will always deny records to save face and limit compensation.

During WWII, the military and government kept detailed records of, for example, comfort women, but to this date the Japanese government has kept denying the existence of such records as it is too ashamed to show the world the atrocious acts committed by its military.

However, we know that these documents exist because there were some that were discovered in China and Korea after the soldiers retreated.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

No records? Then the number must be way over 22. I'm thinking people with little or no communication skills, physically and mentally disabled who are unable to tell the world what happened or who don't even know what was done to them

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The US actually led the way, passing the first eugenics coercive sterilization law in 1907, and investing heavily in eugenics research- 

And this relates to Japan and the compensation issue how?

Face the reality, this is so Japanese. The Japanese will always deny records to save face and limit compensation.

No really? You gotta be kidding me! I feel like I just fell out of a tree!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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