national

291 taken to hospital for heatstroke in one week

27 Comments

The Fire and Disaster Management Agency announced Tuesday that 291 people were taken to hospital nationwide to be treated for heatstroke during the week from May 19 to May 25.

According to the agency, 145 were over 65 years old.

By prefecture, 24 cases were reported in Saitama Prefecture -- the highest number -- followed by 21 each in Aichi and Okayama prefectures.

The agency started releasing figures on heatstroke patients a week earlier than last year. It will release the data each Tuesday on its website.

Last year, more than 50,000 people were taken to hospital to be treated for heatstroke between May and September, according to the agency.

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27 Comments
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And its not even summer yet!

9 ( +9 / -0 )

....heatstroke? sure? perhaps misdiagnosed, since temp range hardly around 20c+

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Is it possible the term "heatstroke" is being misused? 50,000+ last year and nearly 300 last week seems way too high. Heatstroke involves a body temperature of more than 40.6 - seems like that would've been hard to do last week....

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Here's a suggestion based on something clearly missing in Japan. Add more public WATER FOUNTAINS. You'd cut this number in half virtually overnight.

Staying hydrated is one of the best defenses against heatstroke, and you shouldn't need to rely on vending machines.

If you need 2 liters of water per day (on average) and it's 100 yen at least for a 0.5 L bottle of water, that's 400 yen per person walking around town just to stay hydrated.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Heatstroke is, if I am not mistaken, a very serious condition with possible failures of vital organs. Heatexhaustion, however is not anything like it. Since we all know that Japanese people like to do things in groups and feel right at home when others are doing the same, can we possibly presume that since media is reporting their butts off on is, people discover symptoms that don't really exist? Also, seeing as how people here go to the doctor/hospital when they have a cold, perhaps there is a slight hypochondria here? There is no way anybody could have suffered from heatstroke yet.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

And so it begins... Honestly, if people are dumb enough not to listen to the many warnings about this, should taxes really be used to help them when they go to the hospital? It's one thing is granny is stuck in a home with no AC but another if someone is out in their fields (be it sports or farming) ignoring the warnings of covering up, not going out and not drinking plenty of fluids.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Heatstroke??? At first I thought it was somehow a mistake from the webmaster and they put out an article from last August. But,.... must be kidding. It is not even near hot yet and it is already starting. It will be a massacre comes July/August.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Heatstroke? Seriously? The temp has not been above 26'! They should change the name to something more fitting like, weakstroke or stupidstroke!

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Is gettinginto an onsen that is too hot now regarded as heatstroke? Were they working in hot kitchens?

I don't live in Saitama, but I cannot believe it is much hotter than where I do live, and I haven't even used the fans in my house yet.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Honestly, if people are dumb enough not to listen to the many warnings about this, should taxes really be used to help them when they go to the hospital?

Yes. Next question.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Too much of a good thing is usually detrimental and soaking up too much sun can be life-threatening if you don't know how to prevent and treat heat-related conditions. Whether at work, or play, extended periods in the sun can leave a person feeling tired, dehydrated, and weak with the sun rays slowly wearing down the body with each hour spent outdoors. Heat exhaustion results in a rise in the core body temperature to between 38c and 40c degrees. Heat stroke affects a person's cooling system controlled by the brain when the body's core temperature rises to 41c degrees or more. When the body's cooling system ceases to function, a person stops perspiring, causing internal body temperature to rise. That can result in brain damage and damage to other internal organs. In the end learn and remember the signs and symptoms of heat stroke. Don't forget to drink plenty of water and hit the shade now and then. This goes for your dog to.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It's not even hot yet!!!! Geeze

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Heat-related illnesses are a big problem in Kyushu and Shikoku during the summer. Especially Shikoku--the southern small city of Kochi experienced temperatures exceeding 40 degrees Celsius last simmer, which is really bad when combined with the 70+ percent humid you get with the summers in southern and western Japan.

The fact we're getting heat stroke issues now tells me Japan may experience a VERY hot summer unless you're in northern Tohoku region or in Hokkaido.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I'm guessing sun-stroke, not exactly heat-stroke. This is the time of year when a lot of people tend to their fields, so it's entirely possible that if they exert themselves too much in the morning and especially mid-day, they could succumb to it. I'm also guessing the remainder of the people reported to have suffered from "heat-stroke" were school kids out doing club activities or practicing for Sports Day.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Temps and humidity been up for a few days, many areas been recording 30c temperatures, the temp increase came quick. Next week there will be more 30+ temps..

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Heat stroke is the new code word for "I don't know what the hell it is, but I'm 100% SURE it's not related to radiation"

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I'm guessing sun-stroke, not exactly heat-stroke.

You certainly are guessing, because the terms sun-stroke and heat-stroke are describing the same condition.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Heatstroke in May? Let's wear short sleeves then.....

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Funny the article does mention any temperatures. Clearly it has not been hot. Why is this in the news?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I'm in my 50s, jog every day and very rarely use an A/C. Mostly at night for a couple of hours in August. I believe the problem is that japanese use their A/C 24/7. Their bodies can't adjust to the outside temps. People, stop using your A/C so much and stores, small and large, it's freezing inside your store. It does need to be 20degrees inside!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I was really hot and sweaty yesterday in Tokyo, even though the temperature wasn't so high.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

hereforever May. 28, 2014 - 08:02AM JST I believe the problem is that japanese use their A/C 24/7. Their bodies can't adjust to the outside temps.

You notice that very few houses in Japan has basement. Basement offers natural cool room in summer time and you don't need air conditioner. It's also warm room in the winter from natural insolation. The J-goverment should encourage all new constructions and remodeling to include basement. You save on costly electricity.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Yes. Next question.

Why? The system is falling apart so why should tax payers have to pay the stupidity of others? Seems like a great way to save money and teach folks a lesson if the cost comes out of their pocket rather than the pot.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

sfjp330, basements = mold in Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

145 were over 65 but then 146 were under 65.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Although external temperatures do play a role in heat stroke, it is the body's inability to control its body temperature that leads to hea tstroke. So, it could still be under 30 degrees and the body temp goes above 40 and causes heat stroke. Some people get it at lower body temps and some who go over 40 degrees do not get heat stroke.

Two factors that can create or worsen heat stroke are dehydration and wearing the wrong types of clothing, ie: clothing that does not breath.

There are a lot of medications that create conditions that make heat stroke more likely. Also, people who have previously had heat stroke are at a greater risk of getting it again.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Why? The system is falling apart so why should tax payers have to pay the stupidity of others?

It's only your judgement that the system is "falling apart". In any case, the connection between this and asking heatstroke victims to cover the full cost of their medical treatment - over and above what they may already have paid through taxes - is tenuous at best.

Who would make the call on whether stupidity is the deciding factor in someone's heatstroke? Doctors and medical staff have far better things to do, and extra administration/bureaucratic procedures can become costly. The supposed benefit of doing such a thing is doubtful in the first place.

Seems like a great way to save money and teach folks a lesson if the cost comes out of their pocket rather than the pot.

To you. Seems to me like a lousy way. So whose opinion counts for more?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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