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3.7 billion yen in cash recovered from earthquake-hit areas

19 Comments

The National Police Agency says that police departments in Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures -- which were devastated by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami -- have recovered around 3.7 billion in cash from safes and members of the public.

According to an NPA report, which covers the four months between the earthquake and July 10, about 57,000 safes containing around 2.36 billion yen in cash were recovered. Of those, 2,370 safes containing 770 million yen were from Iwate Prefecture, 2,420 safes containing 1.04 billion yen originated in Miyagi Prefecture, and 910 safes containing 553 million yen were returned to Fukushima Prefecture. The NPA said some of the safes contained up to 100 million yen.

Because much of the money was stored with bank books and land registry title deeds, police were able to track down a large proportion of the rightful owners. Police say that 96% of the recovered money has been returned, which amounts to 2.27 billion yen.

The NPA report also states that, including money which was handed in to police in bags, purses and wallets, the recovered total comes to 3.7 billion yen. Around 85% of this total has been returned to its rightful owners. Police said they are continuing to search for clues that will lead them to the owners of the remainder.

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19 Comments
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96% is absolutely awesome.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

That's amazing, they could open 57,000 safes to find the owners. Safes can't be that safe if they can be opened so easy.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

nice to hear a story like this, hope it helps the owners to recover. Theres still alot of GOOD people in the world! Deepest respect for them.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Evidence that there is still much to love about Japan.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

And of course you believe the NPA!

The amount of money was about the same as the entertainment funds for one year in Kanagawa and Hokkaido prefectures, the infamous kuchitomeikin.

But it would be nice to believe it's true...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Thanks to the honesty of the people who found cash and property something positive is emerging from the tragedy.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Think about stories of crime and looting from other nations following a natural disaster (or a championship in a world sport): Good example for the world, Japan.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Because much of the money was stored with bank books and land registry title deeds, police were able to track down a large proportion of the rightful owners. Police say that 96% of the recovered money has been returned.......................................................

hopefully the Japan IRS will not be next to knock on the door.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

While I agree with others that this is very promising news, remember that this is money that was turned in or found by relief workers (police, rescue, etc.). The question is how much was reported lost by the people and how much of that amount was recovered. Either the NPA is avoiding that question, or the media has been told not to report it. My guess is that most people in Japan who keep their savings at home in cash do not have safes. They rely on "under the tatami", or simple dresser drawers. That means there was lots of cash out there "floating around" for crooks to find and keep with close to zero probability of being caught.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Finally, something to feel good about.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

SEE I WANNA MOVE TO JAPAN!!! stuff like this would NEVER happen in Los angeles CA. let alone anywhere else in the USA.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

THAT's a lot of cash, and for it to be turned into the police and then return to it's rightful owners. Gotta love the Japanese. This would almost never happen anywhere else.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Proof that Japanese prefer to keep liquid money at hand rather than invest.

Safes are just a deterrent so a crowbar is more than enough to pry open small safes. In most cases you want to buy a fire proof and water tight safe to store important documents and personnel items (photo negatives, back up hdd, stock options, evidence that you can't bring yourself to destroy....)

What they don't talk about is how many ATM's were broken into right after the tsunami, the local Yakuza selling back bank books, house deeds and hanko seals at extortion prices, shops and warehouses that were looted and all the other typical petty theft that other countries allow the media to write about.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

That is a great news! My deep respect goes to Japanese people.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Honesty reigns in Japan. Good work!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

But the National Police Agency also reported that about ¥250 million as been stolen from within the Fukushima exclusion zone, so not all are so honest?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

handed in to police in bags, purses and wallets,

Greatt...!!!! Gota love Japanese... That makes Japan so special... Best example for putting group interest ahead of personal interest...

Police say that 96% of the recovered money has been returned Super like...!!! :)

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@oberst

hopefully the Japan IRS will not be next to knock on the door.

Why would the tax folks come knocking? Just because someone has a large amount of cash on hand doesn't mean they shirked taxes. Instead of depositing their paycheck into a bank account, they withdrew the funds as cash. Payroll taxes were still paid.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I got -3 for my last comment and today I watch the News saying how nearly every house in the 3km radius was broken into all kinds of stuff stolen. All it takes are a few bad apples just like the J-Gov to paint a negative picture. These are the things that you need to think about and be alert.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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