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3 Fukushima towns selected for 12 storage sites of radioactive debris

18 Comments

The government on Sunday announced that it has chosen three towns in Fukushima Prefecture as potential locations for long-term storage of radioactive debris and topsoil resulting from decontamination activities in the area around the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

Environment minister Goshi Hosono, who is also the minister in charge of the nuclear crisis, said 12 sites will be built in Futaba (two), Okuma (nine) and Naraha (one), Fuji TV reported. Speaking at a meeting of municipal officials, Hosono said the government plans to conduct geological surveys to establish the suitability of the 12 sites for the storage of radioactive materials.

Hosono told a news conference after the meeting that the government plans to ask for further cooperation from other towns and villages in the future, Fuji reported.

Officials from the three towns appeared lukewarm toward the idea after the meeting. They have reportedly been resisting the selection due to a lack of agreement on compensation packages. They also said they cannot give a reply until they have had a chance to discuss the matter with residents.

All of the sites are said to be situated on the east side of National Highway Route 6. The government has announced its intention to perform geological tests at the sites, to check their suitability for embankment building, drilling and other construction operations, Fuji reported.

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18 Comments
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Those are towns were it's unlikely the people will be able to return for many tens of decades.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

So true, nichi. It's really sad.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Sad to note that the debris has found a new home, while evacuees still have no replacement home and continue to live in temporary housing.

Almost a year and a half on and why does the government choose to ignore the well-being of its people?

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Better than hauling it all over Japan and burning it in Tokyo and Shizuoka, in the middle of the tea plantations, etc. Sorry, but keep it where people already can't return. And for pity sake, resolve the compensation issues so people can find a home elsewhere!

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Officials from the three towns appeared lukewarm toward the idea after the meeting. They have reportedly been resisting the selection due to a lack of agreement on compensation packages.

I don't see how those folks have not received compensation yet. J Govt owns TEPCO right. The Officials in those towns were probably looking forward to the meeting to discuss about the compensation of the citizens from their towns. J Govt needs to understand that All take and no give is not the way to run a Govt. Look out for your people J Govt.

But it is a good descision to keep the debris in the area in which it was created.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

200 evacuees from Futaba-machi continue to live in the classrooms in a closed high school building in Saitama Prefecture where the town's government has temporarily relocated. They are mostly elderly residents, and they have nowhere else to go. After nearly 17 months since the accident, the country is quite happy having them live in classrooms with card board partitions.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Hopefully in the future, they will develop a (SAFE) rocket transport system and launch it into the Sun. It's the only safe way to dispose of Nuclear Waste.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Almost a year and a half on and why does the government choose to ignore the well-being of its people?

Because...

(1) It's an admission that there is a problem, when the government has done so much to try and convince people there isn't one.

(2) It costs a lot of money that they want to spend on other things like buying a couple of islands.

(3) They don't care. It's just a few people to them.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Has anyone seen the radiation level readings for the areas in question where the debris is to be housed. I just thinking about the folks who have to build the facilities to house the debris. This website below gives readings for all Japan and SK but the readings don't make sense to me. I was thinking that maybe in Japan they are taking radiation reading higher up like meters in higher than they do in SK. Here is the link:

http://stubbytour.com/nuc/index_en.asp

2 ( +2 / -0 )

On the one hand you might think that, as it's already overloaded with radioactivity, that's the right place to dump waste. then, on the other hand, what if there is another earthquake?

Time to stop building these disgusting things.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Ministry detected many spots in the two towns(1) where annual levels of exposure to radiation would be 100 millisieverts or higher. This is at least five times higher than the level deemed safe for human habitation. According to Japan Atomic Energy Agency calculations, it would take more than 50 years for radiation levels at the sites to naturally fall below the safe limit of 20 millisieverts.

(1)Futaba and Okuma

http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T120108003576.htm

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Oh man, 100 millisieverts or higher. The workers building the facilities to house the debris are going to be working in that. The workers who have to actually pick the debris and put it in the storage buildings too. I hope they all have leadlined suits and everything they need to minimize exposure.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

(3) They don't care. It's just a few people to them.

Don't forget that it's also just a few OLD people. Many of the affected towns had high numbers of aging and elderly people. The longer the government delays, the greater the chances that more will die off. That's money saved on compensation and new the new housing--not to mention hospitals & care homes--needed for them.

That 200 elderly people with nowhere else to go are still living in a school between cardboard partitions is appalling.

How quickly a nation forgets that these same people re-built and fed Japan in the aftermath of WWII. Their collective knowledge and skill base is an untapped asset going to waste--no longer valued by the fast-paced modern world that is happy to leave them behind. They're not even properly taken care of after everything they have done for their country.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The maximum radiation exposure a worker can have will be 50 millisieverts per year, or 100 millisieverts per 5 years. I guess they'll use many of the nuclear gypsies and day laborers to build the depots?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Keep it where it belongs! And keep the public away from it!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"Officials from the three towns appeared lukewarm toward the idea after the meeting. They have reportedly been resisting the selection due to a lack of agreement on compensation packages." I guess money talks.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Back in the spring, the gov't stated it would "rezone" the areas in the no-go zone and special no-go zone.There would be three types of areas.

(1)Areas where people would be allowed to return. (2) Areas where people will be advised not to return. (3) Areas where people will not be allowed to return.

These towns fall in the third area.

The gov't now owns TEPCO and the claims for compensation.

I believe the gov't delay in announcing these areas is because it's now trying to work out a system which would require the least amount of compensation claims, which is estimated to be about ¥4.5 trillion.

It's criminal delaying compensation payments, especially to people, like the 200 evacuee's holed up in Saitama.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

There are state of the art storage facilities in France, can we ship them there?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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