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3,058 treated for heat exhaustion nationwide in week to July 12

28 Comments

The Fire and Disaster Management Agency said Tuesday that 3,058 people nationwide were taken to hospital to be treated for heat exhaustion between July 6 and July 12.

The Japan Meteorological Agency said the Japanese archipelago is currently in the grip of extreme heat brought on by a high pressure system colliding with warm air after a typhoon passed over southern Japan last weekend, Fuji TV reported.

The agency said that temperatures at 2 p.m. on Tuesday surpassed 30 degrees at 550 of its 928 monitoring locations across the nation, and topped 35 degrees at 95 of those locations.

The day's highest temperatures were 39.3 degrees at Tatebayashi in Gunma Prefecture, followed by 39.1 in Date, Fukushima Prefecture, 38.8 degrees in Fukushima City, 37.9 in Yamagata City, 37.8 in Kumagaya, Saitama Prefecture, 37.7 degrees in Kamaishi in Iwate Prefecture, 36.3 in Kyoto and 35.6 in Toyama City. In central Tokyo, the mercury reached 34.3 degrees.

So far, four deaths -- in Saitama, Tochigi and Shizuoka prefectures -- have been attributed to the heatwave, the Fire and Disaster Management Agency said.

The searing temperatures are forecast to continue until late Wednesday when unstable atmospheric conditions are expected as the season's 11th typhoon approaches from the south.

© Japan Today

©2018 GPlusMedia Inc.

28 Comments
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Only 15 more years of suffering this heat until the next mini-ice age. Hang in there, peeps! Drink lots of water and use the air-con when you can. I've been avoiding using mind until now, but you have to put safety above cost and the environment for at least a certain time of day. Heat stroke due to some sort of stoicism isn't going to do anyone any favours.

7 ( +9 / -3 )

Keep cool still no air con here but than I get the early morning sun till about 08:00. Small bit of salt added to water also helps, stay away from overly sugary drinks and carbonated alcoholic beverages.

Drunk up on water about an hour before heading out, takes that long to absorb. Sweat comes from blood.

Light meals during the day salads, sandwiches(subway etc) and bigger meals at night.

Exercise early morning or later in the evenings.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Come on people, drink water, eat a little salty foods and for heaven's sake no exercising outdoors or indoors w/o air.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

are they kidding! The humidity is uncomfortable but nothing compared to 40 plus days in Australia and elsewhere. Stand in the sun in Australia for a few minutes when its over 42 and you will have heatstroke pretty soon.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Just to add to the list of dos and don'ts; if you don't take a pee every 3 or 4 hours you're not drinking enough and, while you are at it, check the colour, anything darker than pale lemon means you're not drinking enough.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Sounds like pretty good advice. Will admit I am not going to the toilet enough. So I will certainly have to drink more.

For those that carry bottles with them on their commutes and want them cold, try to fill them with water and lay them flat in your freezer so the water is below the bottle opening.

After it freezes you can fill it up with your favorite beverage as the opening is clear and the ice is stuck to one side of the bottle. So it's cold and ready to go instead of some massive ice brick you can't drink.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

surfer21

With low humidity even if it's hot under the sun you can easily evade the heat in the shade and quite comfortable once the sun goes down. With high humidity the nights are equally unbearable in which it won't go down below 25 for a month and you bed becomes a puddle of your sweat.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@surfer71. Have to disagree with you. I'm from the northeast Riverina and lived in Sydney and Brissy but I have not experienced weather like a Kanto summer. The dry heat I can handle but 90% humidity is too much. Perhaps northern Australia is like Japan... I don't know? At least the summer hear isn't too long.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@GrungeHamster

Half filling the bottle then freezing - that is a good idea. It's difficult to push ice cubes into a bottle neck :-)

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Oh, the heat. I'm melting.lol

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I've been carrying an 800ml water thermos filled with filtered water, summer and winter, for 9 years now. We keep two liters in the fridge at all times. Only in the summer on the longer days do I need to buy a bottle and fill it up again. I thought everyone did that.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@FizzBit

"I've been carrying an 800ml water thermos filled with filtered water, summer and water, for nine years now."

You should change it. I bet it's absolutely rancid by now....

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Sorry, should have said northwest and here... it's the heat... and my phone, pressing the first word suggestion that comes up ... honestly...: ]

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@surfer21

I've never been to Australia so I don't know if it's "damp" heat over there but it sure is over here... and it's the dampness that gets you... My son tells me the temperature can go up to 45C in Djibouti but, because it's dry heat, they start feeling cold when it drops to 35C !

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The day’s highest temperatures were 39.3 degrees at Tatebayashi in Gunma Prefecture,

Wow! 39.3 degrees! You're almost like getting in the bath from sunrise to sunset. From yesterday I ended up running my A/C around the clock. Even so, high cost electricity bill is better than getting heat exhaustion.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@surfer21

Are they kidding! The humidity is uncomfortable but nothing compared to 40 plus days in Australia and elsewhere. Stand in the sun in Australia for a few minutes when its over 42 and you will have heatstroke pretty soon.

I'm from Australia and I will take an Aussie summer over one here any day of the week. The humidity + stagnant air combo is an absolute killer here :(

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Went to do some business at a Shinsei Bank branch and it must have been hotter in than outside, nearly passed out. I just had to leave. Changing banks this week, SMBC is much cooler.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It's only a little hot. Hydrate reasonably, and don't be stupid (i e. jogging midday).

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Even so, high cost electricity bill is better than getting heat exhaustion.

Yes. When the reactors go back into full service, the japanese will have plenty of energy to fire up them AC's till' late September-

-4 ( +1 / -6 )

The key is don't wait until the heat becomes extreme and don't wait until you get thirsty to drink fluids. Plan ahead and drink plenty of fluids before, during, and after any activity. Drinking enough fluids helps to improve and maintain kidney functions and lowers the body's core temperature. Dehydration can stress the heart and reduce the kidneys ability to maintain the correct balance of electrolytes or charges elements essential for the normal function of every living cell in the body.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

A woman walks with an umbrella to provide some relief from the heat in central Tokyo. AP photo

Umbrellas are for rain. Carrying them for a few minutes walk is a pain on a nice summer day. Those stupid arm accessories are annoying too. If they're going to be so careful, why not just wear a long sleeve blouse? Ever heard of sunscreen? It works-

0 ( +2 / -2 )

It's a parasol or hikasa and, like umbrellas, they are opened an hour before being needed and closed an hour after being needed or, used when walking in a totally shaded street.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The temperature maxed at 31' last week. Let me know when it gets hot!

As someone else stated, it is very humid, but humidity works in your favor by keeping you sweaty, the body's natural cooling system. However, it's because people don't replenish their water reservoir they become dehydrated and start dropping like flies. It's not rocket science to know to keep yourself hydrated during hot and humid weather.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

but humidity works in your favor by keeping you sweaty, the body's natural cooling system.

Not in a Japanese summer though. Sweating keeps you cool only when the sweat evaporates. However, in Japan this doesn't happen as the air is already saturated. You don't understand the mechanism of evaporation?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@Wc626. Why would it bother you what women wear on their arms?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The only way to stay cool is drink a lot water. If you have bottle water buy them by case. You can buy 24 or 48 bottle and put in the freeze. And use them as you go. If you have cooling centers when you go to cool off. Don't take hot showers .use cool water and afterwards fill your bath with cold water it will being your body temperature down and you dry off use corn starch or powder will cool you down as well.this is important drink a lot water. And try to stay cool.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Disillusioned

Sweat will evaporate if you stay under the sun long enough, won't get you any cooler though.

You are underestimating Japan's brutal summer heat with humidity at 80%. In a way keeping cool here in Japan during the summer time without any AC is like how Special Forces personnel ignores pain, just cut it off from the nervous system. LoL

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Let's have a holiday.......!?!?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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