national

1 dead, 2 missing, over 1 million urged to evacuate as typhoon nears

66 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© 2011 AFP

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

66 Comments
Login to comment

sjeesh didnt we get enough water in Japan this year? Theres a huge sandy area in the middle east that could use this water, go there instead ffs.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Evacuate Nagoya and go where?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The 758: go to Shiga (^-^) It's usually pretty safe here.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The Asahi Shimbun is now saying 1 million were asked to evacuate.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The rain has let up for a while, but will be back before morning.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Looks like Tokyo and Fukushima will get this one?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Be prepared. Prepare water, food and emergency lights/candle/match instead. Evacuation is not necessary especially if you're area is not prone to flooding and landslides. Just an opinion. ^^

2 ( +2 / -0 )

zichi

Looks like Tokyo and Fukushima will get this one?

According to meteorological agency it will be right over Nagoya at 6am tomorrow. Damn thing there goes golf :-(

1 ( +1 / -0 )

At 17:30, online Yomiuri was up to 1.32 million evacuees.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

In Japan, there are no laws making an evacuation mandatory, unlike the United States where they can force you to evacuate. In Japan, they can only "advise" you to evacuate. They only have 避難勧告 (hinan kankoku) and 避難指示 (hinan shiji). They don't have 避難命令 (hinan meirei).

0 ( +3 / -3 )

1,000,000 Much easier than the 30 Million Kan PM thought he was going to have to move.

This rain stuff is out of hand. MTS. are dangerous.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Not the whole of Nagoya is ordered, only Mizuho-ku, Tempaku-ku and Midori-ku, three wards that are near a big river.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

They don't have 避難命令 (hinan meirei).

Oh? What about those towns in Fukushima?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Crazy Joe, Interesting, I didn't know that. I always just assumed Shiji was mandatory, but when explained like that, yeah you are right it's not mandatory.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

In Fukushima it was 避難指示 (hinan shiji).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

CrazyJoe: "In Japan, there are no laws making an evacuation mandatory,"

The government never makes anything outside its own personal interests mandatory. Taxes? absolutely! evacuation from a zone full of radiation? "It's up to you". Then when a bunch of people wind up dead the local governments complain they were left to fend for themselves, while the federal government claims it issued the warning and left how it should be handled up to the local governments. No one wants to take responsibility, which is one of the major problems with politics in this nation at the moment. All lip service-laws, no execution of them. This rings true from the PM to the everyday Tanaka; in the last typhoon I had friends in areas that got flooded in Wakayama and they said no one else around them was leaving, so they hesitated. Finally when the water reached the floor boards and one family started leaving their neighbours did, then theirs, then theirs, but of course there was no one to help them.

Hang in there, people, and hunker in. If you think it's bad and there's been a 'voluntary evacuation' use your own judgement. Don't wait for the government to sign your death certificate to admit they should have acted sooner.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

That's right my friends!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Good luck to you, neighbours, don't allow panic.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

how do i know if there was a cancellation for elementary student here in aichi ken??coz of typhoon

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I am just wondering if it wouldn't be a better idea for all those evacuation centers to stock Emergency Food Kits available from Cabelas if someone wants to order.

In the event of a natural disaster or other emergency, you and your family’s survival depends on access to a simple, dependable food source. Stock-up for long-term survival with a ready-made, easy-to-store food kit. Four-serving meals are packaged in individual airtight, nitrogen-packed Mylar® pouches that are then stored in durable, stackable plastic containers. Freeze-dried and dehydrated meals are easy to prepare – just add hot water and in 10-20 minutes enjoy a delicious, nutritional meal. Shelf life of 25 years gives you added peace of mind for years to come. Kit includes 60 servings for a month of two servings per day for one adult or four adults for a week in a grab-and-go bucket.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

l hope we dont have a repeat of the last typhoon and everyone gets through it safely.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Wifey. Public or private school? What part of Aichi? because that's a big area, and really depends whether the school is near a river or in a valley. But otherwise, Generally public schools hardly ever gets cancelled, and private school cancel most of the time because of liability issues. Either way a decision probably won't be made until the morning, based on what warnings are issued by the Met agency at 5am or so.

Heavy rain, or flood warnings often aren't enough to force elementary schools to be cancelled, because the kids come from a local area and the general view is that a bit of water won't hurt the kids, this is Asia after all, with monsoon season and most parents have cars. Strong winds are a different story though, if you haven't noticed already, many Japanese people are paranoid about wind. If there is a chance of Gale Force winds, then schools are often closed. Which is ironic, because it's the rain and flooding that always kills people here!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

how do i know if there was a cancellation for elementary student here in aichi ken??coz of typhoon

NHK - watch tv (non- stop) or listen to NHK Radio, as soon as you wake up .

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@wifey.

The school should have a notification system in place for emergencies and cancellations. Over here we got a list of all parents in the class and the teacher will notify the parent at the top of the list, which then notifies the next parent below and so on.

Some schools put notices up on their web-sites.

Also listen for public announcements via the PA system.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Geez this has been a tough year here. What's up next - pestilence and famine?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@Foxie

In the event of a natural disaster or other emergency, you and your family’s survival depends on access to a simple, dependable food source. Stock-up for long-term survival with a ready-made, easy-to-store food kit. Four-serving meals are packaged in individual airtight, nitrogen-packed Mylar® pouches that are then stored in durable, stackable plastic containers. Freeze-dried and dehydrated meals are easy to prepare – just add hot water and in 10-20 minutes enjoy a delicious, nutritional meal. Shelf life of 25 years gives you added peace of mind for years to come. Kit includes 60 servings for a month of two servings per day for one adult or four adults for a week in a grab-and-go bucket.

That sounded very much like commercial. You work for Cabelas, by any chance?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

The Stormsurf website shows this typhoon tracking right up the east coast. Hope the workers at Dai-Ichi have their tent battened down or it will end ip in Sendai. Gonna be quite a few million tokyoites heavily inconvenienced by this storm tomorrow arvo/evening.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I hope and pray that the good people down in Nagoya are safe!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@lucabrasi: no, I don't work for Cabelas. I just worried about everybody and Cabelas delivers to Japan and they had the cheapest packs. Be safe everybody. But if you find something better, let me know.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

My children's school has already made calls to parents in South Tokyo. They are very vigilant and will notify parents of any early closures. It looks like this will hit close to Tokyo. Everyone be safe.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

A 65-year-old man in Nagoya fell to his death while fixing a stuck drain

And here we go. The legendary wisdom for which our seniors are renowned. Now we're supposed to pretend it's a tragic, inevitable accident, rather than the obvious consequence of stupidity.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

@Foxie

Fair enough. I stand corrected. Thanks for the info! :)

1 ( +1 / -0 )

A 65-year-old man in Nagoya fell to his death while fixing a stuck drain

And that was reported by the "Jiji Press" apparently. Hahaha... Classic

0 ( +2 / -2 )

"A 65-year-old man in Nagoya fell to his death while fixing a stuck drain..."

Sigh... the old man on the roof again. I feel bad saying it given the price these people have paid learning from their mistakes, but there's a time and a place to fix these things, and that time and place is generally NOT during a typhoon!

oikawa: I've noticed the 'jiji press' thing a lot as well recently. Is that new, or have I just not noticed (I usually would).

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Damn, mother nature has a thing for Japan this year.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

And here we go. The legendary wisdom for which our seniors are renowned. Now we're supposed to pretend it's a tragic, inevitable accident, rather than the obvious consequence of stupidity.

There's nothing stupid about fixing a drain. (Oh, he should have done it before the typhoon, yes of course! Hindsight is 20/20)

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I think you can use the term 避難命令 but it includes both 避難勧告 (advisory)/避難指示 (directive) and is not a 強制的な避難命令 like we have in the US.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

A 65-year-old man in Nagoya fell to his death while fixing a stuck drain

Kind of a stretch to call this a typhoon death

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Typhoons are always big talk in Tokyo. They never come. Like the boy who cried wolf . Tokyo residents can not believe it anymore.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

@oikawa

but I expect the double entendre goes right over the heads of most Japanese people. Different kanji. No connection. End.

Really? I have to say that I've always found the Japanese people I know very receptive to that kind of humour. The people I work with, my family, and the guys I drink with love the kanji double entendres. And as a gaijin, if I can manage to come up with one in a timely fashion, well, I'm the funniest guy in the world for a couple of minutes!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@ wifey

many people are correct.. there are lists, school sites, and often NHK has lists of closures. Usually the rule of thumb for typhoons is if by a certain time there is a wind warning or 暴風警報 school is out.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Anybody else notice this thing is strengthening when its supposed to be weakening? It's a damn category 4 now and it's making landfall tomorrow...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

1 million! That is a heck of a lot of people to evacuate.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Jeez. Japan is really taking a beating this year. Still, it makes me wonder what people were thinking building homes in tsunami and flood prone regions.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Japan has been having a rough year full of natural diasters. How many lives have been lost this year

It's like Biblical times

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Skroknog- Where do you think they should build their homes. 70% of the country is covered by mountain.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Damn, mother nature has a thing for Japan this year.

Indeed, this was a terrible year. By the way, why during every typhoon there is ALWAYS someone who will try to fix the roof or the drain ignoring the terrible weather conditions? Is it so difficult to understand that "roof" PLUS "winds of 150 km/h" PLUS "heavy rain" equals DANGER???

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The world just getting older...anywhere and everywhere shaking, thypoon, flooding etc.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

WOAH!!! From Kanagawa, people don't know how to drive in this weather. Some guy slammed into a tree on my way to work. Surf's up, dude!!! Bam!!! Frickin George of the Jungle.

Everybody be careful out there. Worry about the other guy more than yourself.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Big dud here in Tokyo

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Eleven years, countless typhoons and every single time I read the same news. "A 65-year-old man in Nagoya fell to his death while fixing a stuck drain," or something pretty much the same.

Should we hold classes that help people get the idea to stay off ladders and roof tops during typhoons? The house can be fixed later, life is precious. Ride it out and fix it later!!!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

japan girl I am happy that so far the typhoon has bypassed Tokyo and that yourself and fellow citizens are safe, I just hope that people in other prefectures are fairing as well as yourself

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Tokyo will get hit later on today by the main-force, the typhoon just hasn't made it so far up-north yet.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

http://www.jma.go.jp/en/typh/images/zooml/1115-00.png

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Since when did Japan start naming the typhoons? They used to be called by numbers

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Big dud here in Tokyo

It ain't here yet. Just wait.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Big dud here in Tokyo

Facepalm it hasn't even reached mainland Kansai yet. If you're so confident about it by all means stay at work. Good luck getting a train home this evening though. I'll be leaving the office before 2pm.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

WOAH!!! From Kanagawa, people don't know how to drive in this weather. Some guy slammed into a tree on my way to work. Surf's up, dude!!! Bam!!! Frickin George of the Jungle

NetNinja - Cocaine is a hell of a drug.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

gogogo.

Japan didn't name them, they are named by the country in which region they 1st form. They always had a name and a number assigned.

Surprised no news about No.16 which should also be here soon.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@It's ME, thanks for the link. Here's another useful one:

http://www.tropicalstormrisk.com/tracker/dynamic/201118W.html

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Surprised no news about No.16 which should also be here soon.

16 already missed Japan completely. It's headed out to the N Pacific now.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I was born in Nagoya and when I was 2 years old, Ise-wan typhoon devastated Nagoya. The entire roof of our home blew away but luckily, we were in the basement of the house next door. Please be careful and I will be keeping Japan and her people in my prayers!!

On September 26, 1959, the Ise-wan Typhoon (Typhoon Vera) devastated the Ise Bay area. Rising tidal levels and pounding surf collapsed banks and inundated low lying areas of the coast. 5,041 people were killed or missing, 38,921 were injured, and 149,187 houses were totally or partially destroyed. Estimates place the cost of the damage between 500 and 600 billion yen. The damage and loss of life caused by the Ise-wan Typhoon remains the worst recorded by a typhoon in Japan

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Damn it is raining Salerymen here in kobe!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I wonder why people want disaster to come to them so bad that they're disappointed when disaster doesn't come.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Big dud here in Tokyo

Huh? It hadn't even started affecting Tokyo when you wrote that, it was still down off Shikoku. The river near where I live in west Tokyo just rose a metre in half an hour and is still rising. I don't think we're going to get our roofs blown off, but it's more than just a sprinkle of rain.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

God forbid they learn anything from the Chinese, but in Hong Kong it's organised to the max & everyone knows when signal 8 (next one after no. 3, of course) goes up, public transport is about to close down in most areas. http://www.hko.gov.hk/publica/gen_pub/tcws.pdf

Compare that to total case about 20 years ago when it took me two hours to get from Ikebukuro to Takadanobaba in a typhoon & when I swam into work I was not told "Gambarimashita" but "Why are you late? Your clients are waiting!" - and this was pre-keitai, when I had to stop at every damn pay phone & update them as to which trains were cancelled & where I was now walking. Saito san, I hope you're rotting in a hell of your own making!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites