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Divers find wreckage, bodies from U.S. Osprey aircraft that crashed off Japan

25 Comments
By Mari Yamaguchi

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25 Comments
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8 ( +12 / -4 )

RIP.

Terrible for their families.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

Terrible. I really wonder about this aircraft.

-5 ( +8 / -13 )

Condolences to the families and loved ones.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

 I really wonder about this aircraft.

Why? Do even a tiny bit of research and you will find out that what you "wonder about" is not based upon facts.

-1 ( +11 / -12 )

RIP to those who have given their lives in the service of their country and condolences to their families and loved ones.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

Condolences to their friends and loved ones.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

There are some strong currents down there. I guess that is why they couldn't find it for so long, despite witnesses to the crash. A tragic result.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

As of November 2023, 16 V-22 Ospreys have been damaged beyond repair in accidents that have killed a total of 62 people. Four crashes killed a total of 30 people during testing from 1991 to 2000. Since the V-22 became operational in 2007, 12 crashes, including two in combat zones, and several other accidents and incidentshave killed a total of 33 people.

The Osprey needs to be put to rest.

Under the Japan-U.S. Status of Forces Agreement, Japanese authorities are not given the right to seize or investigate U.S. military property unless the U.S. decides otherwise. That means it will be practically impossible for Japan to independently investigate the cause of the accident.

Obviously they need Japan’s help in investigating the causes of these accidents.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

I have always hated American Forces based through-out Japan.

Nothing but trouble & death for some.

-3 ( +7 / -10 )

At least the families will have some closure. RIP brave service members.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

The deceased should be receiving condolences and their families!

Poor people, imagine not knowing what happened to one of yours.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

All it would take would be for one of these "perfectly safe" aircraft to crash in a populated area. They frequently overfly Naha.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Hope their souls made it to Yakushima Island, a beautiful place to rest in peace.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

As of November 2023, 16 V-22 Ospreys have been damaged beyond repair in accidents that have killed a total of 62 people. Four crashes killed a total of 30 people during testing from 1991 to 2000. Since the V-22 became operational in 2007, 12 crashes, including two in combat zones, and several other accidents and incidentshave killed a total of 33 people.

Statistically, there would have been even more crashed helis if they had been performing the same roles instead.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Ospreys have had a number of crashes, including in Japan, where they are used at U.S. and Japanese military bases, and the latest accident has rekindled safety concerns.

Get that flying crap out of Japan..

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

ok and now its pack and go back home take your ospreys with you.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

wallace

this could be avoided:

1/if ospreys will be not in Japan

2/if US army will have no foot here

as I wrote above solution is easy.pack ospreys and other weaponry and go back home to avoid more losses.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

ZENJIToday 01:48 am JST

I have always hated American Forces based through-out Japan.

> Nothing but trouble & death for some.

Maybe one day when the U.S. leaves, you'll get to hate the Chinese or Russians, too. The only difference will be that you won't be able to say it freely. RIP to the brave servicemen who died to protect your freedom.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Rest in Peace.

These men died in the duty of securing the defense of Japan. They will be honored - and deservedly so.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The larger of the two ships shown is a Uraga class mine warfare ship ( JS Uraga or JS Bungo ). The smaller vessel is a minesweeper but I cannot determine the class. These would have ROVs with cameras and other sensors useful for hunting mines or for finding a downed aircraft.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

As of November 2023, 16 V-22 Ospreys have been damaged beyond repair in accidents that have killed a total of 62 people. Four crashes killed a total of 30 people during testing from 1991 to 2000. Since the V-22 became operational in 2007, 12 crashes, including two in combat zones, and several other accidents and incidentshave killed a total of 33 people.

The Osprey needs to be put to rest.

The V-22 has a lower mishap rate per 100,000 flight hours than the C-130 Hercules. It has a lower mishap rate than any other aircraft in the Marine Corps inventory except the F-35B. Aircraft enthusiasts all around the world go all rubbery kneed and practically wet themselves praising the Herc, but they crash more often and kill more people than the Osprey.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

There are some strong currents down there. I guess that is why they couldn't find it for so long, despite witnesses to the crash. A tragic result.

Most of the Pacific is anything but pacific. This isn't a tropical lagoon with calm, crystal clear water. Much of the Pacific is rough (I've sailed it) and I would be inclined to believe poor visibility hindered finding that aircraft. Seeing the use of mine warfare vessels tells me they needed sensors that can find metal objects in the water.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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