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5 U.S. states get $250,000 federal grants for tsunami debris removal

23 Comments

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..and so is Japan.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

Any debris arriving on American beaches is the responsibity of America. That's just the way it works out. And I bet if someone in Oregon or somewhere on the US west coast found a safe in the debris with $1M in it you could be sure someone in Japan would be screaming for its return...

5 ( +6 / -1 )

That kind of money would only be needed for large things - like the dock that washed ashore in Oregon. Senator Begich is dreaming if he thinks $45 million would EVER get allocated for what mostly amounts to beachcombers picking things up. $250,000 is fine for now. Let's wait to see what actually makes it to shore before we start claiming millions of dollars are needed.

And Zichi is correct, this is OUR problem. Even though Japan offered assistance, I doubt we'll take them up on it because who knows when a reversal of fortune happens and our debris washes up on THEIR shore? Mother Nature doesn't play favorites, nor does she play politics.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Yes, WE will need to pay for the clean-up, just like we've ALWAYS done when debris washes ashore. We have FEMA funds that can be released if the debris becomes such a problem that the Federal government has to step in.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

"Deduct it from the bills we pay for Okinawa base."

Here we go again. My guess is you couldn't bring yourself to say this kind of drivel on the threads where China poses a threat to Japan. The hypocrisy is astounding.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Pretty lame budget for a pretty big problem. Maybe the 5 states should just use the budget to mail everything to the East Coast.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It's rather fascinating that the floating debris covers an area roughly three times the size of the contiguous United States. And that's without taking into account the huge amount floating trash that has already been collected in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

It's also worth noting that not all of the Japan debris will reach US shores, the majority of it will bounce back into the ocean and settle somewhere in the middle with the rest of the floating debris.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Sad to note that the JP Government has yet to offer financial aid to the US for tsunami debris cleanup.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

When a company places a bid for a contract with the US Govt they submit a proposal, basically the lowest bid that will that will do the most amount of work will get the contract.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I need to add that we have found many debres made in China and S. Korea there too. As you have been aware of the fact China (I do not know about S. Korea) has not enforcing any environmental issue at all.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I suspect some states will use their National Guard units to patrol beaches.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Anyway, the is the result of an "act of God" and Japan cannot be held financially responsible, no negligence involved.

Exactly. This is the difference between the debris accumulating now, and the clean-up that was performed after the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Prince William Strait off of Alaska. Exxon (through the actions of the tanker captain) was negligent and was held responsible for paying for the clean up. Japan cannot be considered negligent in the event of a tsunami and so is not required to foot the bill for the clean-up of whatever makes it to foreign soil. It's just basic common sense.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

And I bet if someone in Oregon or somewhere on the US west coast found a safe in the debris with $1M in it you could be sure someone in Japan would be screaming for its return...

I bet if someone in Japan found a safe from Oregon, every last cent of the money would be returned whoever lost it without a moment's thought.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Any debris arriving on American beaches is the responsibity of America. That's just the way it works out. The tsunami was a natural disaster, just like the big one back in 2004.

0 ( +8 / -8 )

When a company places a bid for a contract with the US Govt they submit a proposal, basically the lowest bid that will that will do the most amount of work will get the contract.

The tender documents will probably be offered by the states, not the federal gov't. $50K is assistance and will not go very far considering the debris will be washing ashore for a long time.

Anyway, the is the result of an "act of God" and Japan cannot be held financially responsible, no negligence involved.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It was nice for the USA Federal government to give funds to assist in the cleanup.

It is not nice for the States and the people to "expect" that the government should or must pay for it all. It is everyone's responsibility to keep earth clean and not just the government, regardless of taxes paid.

It is the same thing here in Japan. Instead of sitting down at home waiting for volunteers and government funds to come and clean up the mess, get out and take a few debris and clean up the area. That is what it takes to live. Even the wild birds have cleaned up their nests after storms without the aid of government money.

What Federal and Sate governments can help with is to find and offer places where certain debris can be disposed. It is not easy to find private disposal areas. But if the States can use such funds to find those places, why not?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Get private enterprise involved somehow to solve the problem. Can't depend on the government for everything.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

FadamorJul. 18, 2012 - 04:40AM JST

Japan cannot be considered negligent in the event of a tsunami and so is not required to foot the bill for the clean-up of whatever makes it to foreign soil. It's just basic common sense.

No one is suggesting that Japan foot the bill. I don't even know why we're having this conversation in the first place. You're fighting the invisible argument. Alaskan senator wants more money from the US federal government, not Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

$ 50,000 per state- that wouldn't cover the cost of one mans labor !- They really got their heads in a Dark, Dank place! what an insult to all involved.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How much of this money is from Japan? I know they have stated they would help, and I think that's a good thing, but how much are they going to help?

It does indeed sound woefully inadequate, and quite pathetic, really. They need more if they want to seriously clean up this mess. It is not Japan's fault by any means, but as it comes from Japan there is a need for money to be put forward from Japan to clean it up.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

50 thousand US dollars???? Well that should just about pay the wage of one Alaskan for 1 year after administrative cost are deducted.. never mind fuel transport and other logistics. 99 percent of Alaska's shore line is remote,no road access and much shoreline is rugged.with no where to land a vessel.. I really don't think the State Fed,or anyone will clean the mess up.....50 grand??? That's ridiculous!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Just cut down the billions in funding money that they use for nuclear research... and use a small percentage on this.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Can we send the bill to Tokyo?? The US is broke.

-9 ( +4 / -13 )

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